Questions about Ryzen 7 2700x Overclocking and Voltage (can't reach 4.2 with *Safe Voltages*)

May 19, 2018
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I just got my Ryzen 7 2700x and I have been trying to overlock it. (New to CPU OC)

I see that everyone is able to get 4.2 and 4.3 GHz under 1.45 volts/Auto Voltage
but when I try it just crashes.
iu even tried 4.2GHz on 1.5V I knew that it was a bit high. but it didn't want to complete a Cinebench 15 Run.
I was wondering why I can't get my CPU over 4.15Ghz at 1.48 Volts which is still pretty high.
if I try using Auto voltage it just soft locks after 1 second in any stress test.
Right now as of speaking my CPU is Running at 4.15Ghz at 1.48 Volts (Average Idle Temp: 45c) (Under load *Recording and Gaming / Stress Tests* Temp: 78c-85c )

Specs:

[PSU] - Corsair RM850x, 850W
[RAM] - Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO DDR4 16GB
[PCB] - Asus ROG Strix X470-F Gaming
[GPU] - RTX 2070 Msi Gaming Z
[CPU] - AMD Ryzen 7 2700x

What is maxing temp?
What is maxing Voltage?
Does my motherboard supply my CPU with the amount I put in?
Will I destroy my CPU running 1.5 or under over time?
does it have anything to do with my Memory being Overclocked to 3266Mhz?


I know that R7 2700x prefers lower temps then high performance so I was wondering what temps R7 starts to drop voltage and Clock Ratio to get better Temps

It seems like I am the only one how cant find a stable Clock on 4.2 - 4.3Ghz But what do I know.
I am better at GPU overclocking then CPU O_0

Thanks for Reading <3
 

Darkbreeze

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Do you have the MOST recent BIOS version installed?

Is your memory configuration stable? Have you TESTED the memory configuration using Memtest86, first at the default configuration and then with XMP enabled? Because if you have not, that MIGHT be affecting your overclock. Also, if you HAVE enabled XMP, you need to DISABLE it until AFTER you are finished configuring and validating the stability of your CPU overclock. THEN, and ONLY then do you move on to changing the memory configuration beyond the default SPD settings, or in other words, setting DOCP/A-XMP, etc.


*Basic CPU overclocking tutorial


*Resolving memory problems and setting up XMP/DOCP/AMP profiles
 
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What frequencies are you getting when all at auto with PBO enabled. With Ryzen your max OC on all cores is just about same as max boost on few cores.
You didn't say which CPU cooler you have so I have to assume it's stock one. You'll never be able to get more OC on all cores with it, need something better.
 
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May 19, 2018
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With PBO Enabled I get 4.17 GHz With auto Voltages and it was unstable. I had to manually set a static voltage for it to be stable. but that's how high it goes. Sorry, I should have put that in the Specs. I use a 'Corsair Hydro H150i PRO RGB CPU' alltho it dose not have the best air intake with my Corsair Spec Omega RGB

[CASE] - https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07B2YJXLM/ref=twister_B07DRGBL28?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1
[AI COOLER] - https://www.amazon.com/Radiator-Advanced-Lighting-Software-compatible/dp/B077FZPCRH/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1546780467&sr=1-1&keywords=corsair+360
 
May 19, 2018
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I do have the most Recent BIOS.
I have not tested my Ram with MemTest86 but I have tested it with Prime95 (Don't know if that is good or not) it lasted 1 hour before I turned it off.
I tested both the ram at 2133 and 3266 they had the same resultant.
I will try OC it without having any Memory OC.
 
May 19, 2018
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. . . . . Well, that's a shame.
 

Redneck5439

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You should be getting better results than that. First off, as someone else suggested, manual overclocking on the R7 2700X is all but pointless unless you are under extreme custom loop type cooling and are going for 4.4Ghz+. In most cases as long as you have the settings right XFR2, PB2, and PBO will be all you need to get 4.2Ghz (or better) all core boosts and 4.35Ghz+ single core boosts. I have just about the same setup that you do (only difference is different RAM brand). My all core boosts are 4.166Mhz - 4.215Mhz and single core boosts are always pegged at 4.35Ghz. I am also still on the stock Prism cooler.

You want to make sure a few things are set up right for performance. First off (after seeing the Verge try to build a PC- epic fail...) I now always ask people if they are running their RAM in dual channel and have the RAM in the proper slots (either 1,3 or 2,4 for their motherboard configuration) saying I have the same motherboard you do the RAM is supposed to be B2 and A2 (or from left to right slots 2 and 4). RAM has to be set in this fashion to properly run in the fastest dual channel mode possible. Next are you running the latest bios (Version 4207) from the Asus webpage? If not, flash the latest bios. With these boards after flashing I highly recommend doing a battery pull CMOS reset. Simply pull the battery on your motherboard for a couple minutes, push the power button a couple times with battery removed to fully discharge the PSU capacitors and then reinstall the battery. Then allow the system to fully boot into Windows, then restart and manually re-enter all your bios custom changes (don't just choose a profile as for some reason with this board it causes issues).

Next did you set the proper timings for your RAM in bios? The easiest way on our motherboards is just to set the AI overclock to D.O.C.P. mode (I recommend staying away from Manual mode and manual overclocking with Ryzen Plus). D.O.C.P. mode will automatically set the "approved RAM timings and speed" for you particular RAM. I recommend setting the performance enhancer option in bios to Level 2 as 2 will increase voltage allowances for better performance and set the PBO scalar to 10X (something that we can't manually set with this motherboard). Note there is the "overclocking" options of 3 and 4 but for best stability I recommend Level 2. Important note, with this motherboard I do not recommend touching APU frequency as it typically destabilizes the system and isn't a true bclk overclock turner. Next set the Performance Bias to Cinebench R15 as I have found it helps in much more than just Cinebench.

Next up is AUTO settings, which to leave on and which to set to manual or enable. I've spent a long time tweaking the bios settings for this board and have found that Vcore should be set to negative offset (as under auto way too much power is supplied to the processor) I found with my board I can run stable with a negative offset of .11875, but you may want to start with a negative offset of .1000 till you find the "sweet spot" for your processor. I also found that you want to set the SOC voltage to manual as again on AUTO way too much power is supplied, I have mine set to 1.06250V but it is recommended to set it at 1.1V and through testing lower the voltage till you find the "sweet spot". Next I recommend setting the C-state to enabled from AUTO as I was having major issues with the C-state on AUTO (was actually causing my CPU fan to stop responding and other random issues). I also recommend in bios setting an "aggressive" fan curve for whatever cooling you are using. The cooler you can keep your CPU and all other components the higher your CPU will boost, I have stock cooling on the processor but I have 6 140mm case fans (and am planning an upgrade to AIO soon).

Last up is to enable Precision Boost Overdrive. Make sure its actually enabled, you will have to accept a disclaimer and make sure you change the setting from AUTO to ENABLE. Everything else you should be able to keep on AUTO. You can of course also optimize your RAM by increasing the speed, and tightening the timings using the Ryzen RAM calculator. I have Trident Z RGB 3200Mhz RAM that I am running at 3600Mhz, but everyone's results vary with RAM overclocking and timings. Utilizing these settings Your 2700X should be able to boost from 4.166Mhz to 4.2Ghz all core and should hit 4.3Ghz single core as long as your cooling is adequate.
 
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Ok... I do have my memory in dual channel Slot 2 and 4 witch it said in the manual is the right slots.
I also have the latest bios *4207*
Alltho my ram is running at 3266 and not 3200 which is the speed labeled on the website and the box.
I have also Enabled performance enhancer option to level 2.
I also went to Performance Bias and enabled Cinebench R15


Question 1: What does negative offset do? how does it work? and why those numbers (or should I just search it up?)
Question 2: I did find PBO but I didn't find anything called PBO scalar (There was only one option.*AMD CBS > NBIO Common Options > and then I had to accept a thing > Precision Boost Overdrive from Auto to Enabled*)

(Not that I don't trust you, I just want to learn this. so I would appreciate if you would tell me why those settings <3)

BTW: The reason I want higher speeds is because I am planning on recording/streaming and Video Editing.
so i would prefer a stabled clock then balls to the walls clock.




 
May 19, 2018
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Just want to post an Update. I tryed with the Voltage settings.
but as soon as i started any kind of CPU test (Even CB15) it imidiently softlocked and i had to turn my pc

Image

Image
 

Darkbreeze

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Have you tried ANY of this, with the memory set to the default speed and timings, no profiles enabled? Regardless that the information offered by Redneck5439 is probably all good, ANY kind of CPU overclock should be configured with the memory at the default configuration, then tested to be stable and THEN you tune memory to manual or XMP values. Always. Every. Single. Platform. Generation and platform don't matter, it's still the same process.

If you have NOT tried configuring the overclock settings with the memory at the default configuration, I would at least TRY that. I have to 100% agree though that for MOST current Ryzen platforms, there is very little overclocking headroom and unless you have an exceptional sample, not a whole lot of point in spending the time required to get a stable overclock that will net you any gains at all, unless you have both a very good piece of silicon AND a really good motherboard with a good VRM configuration. A power supply with exceptional levels of ripple and voltage regulation are a real consideration as well because it seems as though Ryzen is moderately more susceptible to any deviations in power delivery than most other prior or existing platforms.

You have a good PSU, but if it's an older unit it may be waning.
 
Things are getting better than that. With this setup I just set DOCP at 3000, Ram at 3600, Voltage at 1.4 and multiplier at 43. it worked but not all stable. Added Llc 3 and that keeps everything cool at maximum 1.417v at full load.
 

Darkbreeze

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Huh? How do you set DOCP at 3000 but "Ram" at 3600? The DOCP configuration IS the memory speed, as well as the primary and most of the secondary timings. Tertiary timings are usually configured by the motherboard/MC unless you configure them manually. Unless maybe you're referring to something that I'm missing?
 

Redneck5439

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To answer your questions a negative offset reduces the voltage going to your CPU by whatever the offset is. Basically on AUTO setting PBO will automatically adjust the voltage going to your CPU, unfortunately every case that I have seen it supplies too much power, or at least way more than what is actually needed. Say your processor can hit 4.2Ghz using only 1.35V but on AUTO it is supplying 1.55V to the processor to hit the same speed- both settings will work, but your going to be seeing much higher heat generated at 1.55V which will limit your overclock boost headroom. So a negative offset will lower the 1.55V to 1.36V and be much closer to the minimal you actually need.

2. I tried to explain this but may have been obscure. Our motherboards have no scalar setting that you can enter under PBO settings. That is why I had you set performance mode to Level 2. At level 2 the scalar is automatically set to 10X, which is what you want.

I also noticed with your supplied pictures that you are massively over volting your CPU. You have the offset mode set to positive "+" sign. You need to have the offset set to negative "-" sigh. And start with a negative offset of 0.1000V then work your way to higher negative offsets via trial and error to see how high you can push the negative offset (which because it is subtracting voltage will actually be giving you lower Vcore).

I would also recommend that until you get your system stable to just run your RAM at "stock" which is achieved by simply setting the AI Overclock Tuner to D.O.C.P. mode.

Right now I would say that your biggest problem is that you have set a positive offset by accident. What this is actually doing is providing extra voltage to the AUTO voltage scaling that is already too high to begin with. With that positive offset it is possible that you are hitting over 1.6V and that much voltage can damage your processor very easily, I suggest you correct that situation ASAP.
 

Darkbreeze

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Actually, that's not accurate. "Stock" would be with the memory at the default, nothing touched setting of 2133mhz, which leaves things equal across the board for all systems. DOCP is no different than XMP, AMP, A-XMP, whatever you want to call it. It is STILL an overclock, even if it is an overclock that the manufacturer says is stable using the timings and voltage specified in the profile.

And obviously, this is going to be different for every memory kit model, even if they have the same primary settings and voltage in the profile configuration. You can't have one system that is "stock" settings with two different memory kits if one is running at 3000mhz with timings of 14-14-14-34 and 1.35v and another one be "Stock" with 16-16-16-35 and 1.35v. Those are both not stock.

They are the default PROFILE settings for those sticks, but they are not "stock". Stock is 2133mhz with 1.2v for all, or practically all DDR4 whether you're talking about a Ryzen or Intel platform. It might seem like semantics, but it's really not. There is a huge difference and the fact that few people pay attention to the fact that it is a bad practice to configure an overclock using the XMP profile configuration just shows that few actually understand the process and how it should actually be done.

I can't tell you how many people have borked an overclock trying to configure the CPU for stability and the memory itself or it's configuration was the trouble all along. As well, those memory profiles are NOT written in stone. They are obviously not going to work on every system as advertised, but usually they WILL be more likely to do so AFTER an overclock is already in place because the memory controller is going to be a lot more amicable with an overclocked CPU than without, usually.

I get it that a lot of people don't follow best practices, and just set XMP right off the bat before doing much else, because sometimes it does not cause any troubles but that is not always the case and when it's not you might be chasing down ghosts or leaving a lot of your CPU overclock on the table which is a bad idea because you are going to see a lot more gains from a few hundred mhz of CPU overclock than you typically are from a few hundred mhz of memory speed. Obviously, you want both, but given a choice, I'd want the CPU as fast as it can be and remain stable, FIRST, and then worry about the memory profile speed. Doing so will generally make your life easier as the memory is going to tend to like the profile speed a lot more when the MC is playing ball anyhow.

But you had the right idea when you said the first part, which was

 

Redneck5439

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I can definitely see your point, and I can see where you are coming from. The biggest issue facing the OP right now though is he could fry is processor and do serious damage to his rig if he doesn't address the positive offset that he is running. I don't like when my R7 2700X hits 1.5V, with that positive offset the OP could be over volting up to 1.65V which is probably why the system is locking on him, it is more than likely triggering a fail safe.
 

Darkbreeze

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Oh, I'm not discrediting the validity of THAT point. That certainly needs to be addressed as well. Honestly, I'd REALLY recommend resetting the entire configuration back to default settings in the BIOS and begin again, incrementally, not trying to just "jump" to the plateau where the CPU has reached it's best or highest performance configuration.

It's ALWAYS recommended, regardless of platform, to increase and test, incrementally, your clock frequency and voltage, verifying and validating stability and thermal compliance each step of the way. All the more reason to have the memory at the stock configuration to begin with because you need to know whether something is hitting a wall due to the CPU or whether the memory is causing it. The difference in CPU temp and behavior with memory that is at 3000mhz is tremendously different, or can be, than the same configuration with the memory at the default JEDEC SPD profile rather than when set to it's XMP or an overclocked value.

At least that way, you already know that the CPU itself is capable of a given configuration at a given voltage so you can tune accordingly once you DO configure the memory at the higher profile voltage, speed and timings.

Also, as I mentioned, often you will find that with a stable, overclocked CPU, you can sometimes adjust the memory voltage DOWN, and still resolve it to a stable configuration simply by way of the MC being more agreeable. Memory speed and voltage, and to some degree, timings, have a direct relationship with CPU temperature.
 

My Asus Prime x470 Pro has separate entries for DOCP and RAM frequency. Once you enable DOCP it has 2 settings (because of 2 XMP on this memory). DOCP sets all timings according to XMP for 3000MHz. Changing Just frequency doesn't also change timings. That way I'm running memory at 3000MHz timings (Cl16 etc.) but at 3600MHz frequency (according to XMP it should be Cl18 etc.) Works fine and all stable although it could be a bit more refined using some settings not included in XMP.

 

Darkbreeze

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I'd be amazed, and I mean REALLY amazed, at ANY system that could run a set of sticks using the timings for the 3000mhz XMP profile while running at 3600mhz, and actually be stable. It's terribly hard to even raise the frequency one step (3000 to 3200mhz, etc.) and not change the timings at all so to overclock the memory to 3600mhz from 3000mhz and leave the timings as is unless they are sticks with really loose timings to begin with or a really fanstastic set of sticks with a superb overclocking board that has great VRMs is almost unheard of. I've certainly not seen it.

I'll have to do some looking into that because to say the least I'm pretty dubious about the extent of the configuration, but not that what you're saying regarding the settings works. I'm not sure at all on that. I'll have to look into that as well because that's another thing I have not heard about with these ASUS boards.

Have you tested that memory configuration by running Memtest86 for four passes and then an 8 hour run of Realbench with your full memory capacity selected? Because if it can't do that, it's not stable, and if it's not stable, whew boy, are you going to be sad when the corruption catches up with you.
 

Darkbreeze

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I have Thaiphoon burner, the paid version, that allows you to CHANGE the hard coded profiles, but I'm not sure what that has to do with this conversation. Maybe it does, as it still seems as though there is something in all of this that you are trying to convey that I'm apparently not understanding.

I realize most, if not all memory modules come with multiple profiles. Each of those profiles consists of a set of hard coded configurations for speed, voltage, primary, secondary and tertiary timings. Mixing and matching any of those is not intended to be a best practice. Each set of configurations is intended to be used "in toto" if a specific profile is selected. The default configuration or any of the XMP/AMP/A-XMP/DOCP profiles that are programmed into are exclusive of any considerations related to changing those settings manually.

Once you change even one setting, you are no longer running within the boundaries of that profile and are running a manual or overclocked configuration of some form. To me, DOCP is nothing more than ASUS taking the XMP profile and tweaking it according to it's own parameters which many motherboards will do if you leave the memory configuration set to Auto on everything or everything except the speed and voltage. DOCP is actually more complex than that but I think that's sort of the gist of it.

I will admit that DOCP is one area of memory configuration that I have not had much chance to work hands on with but I have read extensively about it and have a pretty fair amount of experience with memory configurations on almost all other consumer platforms. Obviously, memory configurations have a whole other dimension when you get into server and enterprise platforms.
 
XMP are just presets not a law, it's not like it wouldn't work if you use some settings outside of XMP profile. Take this particular RAM (Kingston), XMP profile for 3602MHz stipulates Cl18 and for 3002MHz Cl16. It just happens that it works at 3600MHz with CL16. So DOCP 3000 keeps CL16 even if memory frequency is set as 3600MHz.
 

Darkbreeze

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Yeah, like I said, it's what the MANUFACTURER has determined to be the most likely stable configuration for a given set of sticks based on the tested properies of a given module configuration. Of course you can manually (Or automatically) make adjustments to those settings but the MOST probably configuration that will be stable is the exact configuration laid out by the profile, or something lower and looser that the board/MC can train the configuration to based on it's own algorithms and tables.

But I think this conversation has gone beyond it's relevance to this thread, so lets get back on track if we haven't already chased the OP off. I don't think the level of discussion is really applicable to the current dilemma.
 
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I did what you said Redneck5439 and now my PC won't boot :/

Update: yeah I got it working now. just had to take out my GPU and the Motherboard Battery.
 

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