Questions from AMD RADEON newbie.

KHADER87

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Feb 25, 2015
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Hi,

I just got sapphire rx580 nitro+ special edition, factory overclocked to 1430.

I have couple of questions for optimal gaming performance and lower FPS drops.

1- cant under stands stats in wattman, state 1, 2.... Etc is it ok to change all to 1430 or 1450 or whatever the max frequancy the card can handle? What about percentage increase?

2- when i keep stats as as, ascending, i noticed framps drops.

3- my card has 6 and 8 pin pcie inputs, which is better one pcie cable that have 6 and 8 pin? Or two cables from the psu? The card can draw 205 watt on my computer and i have thermaltake 730w bronze 87% efficiency.

4- which is better with freesync, vsync on/off or frame limiter?

5- does Chill feature on reduce input lag? Or jusy reduce power and will norice frams drops?

6- I have lg ultrawide when i change the response time to faster i can notice frams drops and few stutter! Dont know why!!

7- whats the best settings on amd settings and wattman for best performance.

Thanks


 


1. You can change the frequency. That small a change is meaningless. As long as the card doesn't overheat you are fine. Just don't fiddle with the voltage. Leave it on automatic. I'd also use a more aggresive fan curve.

2. If FPS is steadily going down while gaming. You may need a more aggressive fan curve and/or better case cooling. Note that fluctuation is normal during game play. As different environments and other factors can affect FPS.

3. If the card has two connectors. You need to use both connectors.

4. If you have a Freesync monitor. Use Freesync, it is the best. If not use VSync or Frame Limiter. Just try both and see which you like better. It is more personal preference.

5. Chill reduces power usage. It reduces performance to save power. This would also reduce temps.

6. Your monitor just may not be able to handle those higher frames properly. I'd just stick to normal mode if it looks better.

7. I'd just leave it at default. Except maybe a higher fan speed if needed. Overclocking won't add much performance. If you want to give it a go. Check out this PCWorld article. Don't go nuts with the memory without a really aggressive fan curve. It needs to stay cool all the time. As I recall the temp sensors don't apply to memory. So, it is easy to overheat when overclocked if GPU load is low and memory load is high (usually a mining problem).
https://www.pcworld.com/article/3094984/components-graphics/how-to-use-amds-wattman-the-powerful-new-overclocking-tool-for-radeon-graphics-cards.html

I use Unigine Valley at max settings to stress test a GPU. Superposition may be better. As I recall they got rid of the loop feature in the free version. So, I stick with Valley. Once I have my settings dialed in. I let it run for a few hours to check stability.
 


1. You can change the frequency. That small a change is meaningless. As long as the card doesn't overheat you are fine. Just don't fiddle with the voltage. Leave it on automatic. I'd also use a more aggresive fan curve.

2. If FPS is steadily going down while gaming. You may need a more aggressive fan curve and/or better case cooling. Note that fluctuation is normal during game play. As different environments and other factors can affect FPS.

3. If the card has two connectors. You need to use both connectors.

4. If you have a Freesync monitor. Use Freesync, it is the best. If not use VSync or Frame Limiter. Just try both and see which you like better. It is more personal preference.

5. Chill reduces power usage. It reduces performance to save power. This would also reduce temps.

6. Your monitor just may not be able to handle those higher frames properly. I'd just stick to normal mode if it looks better.

7. I'd just leave it at default. Except maybe a higher fan speed if needed. Overclocking won't add much performance. If you want to give it a go. Check out this PCWorld article. Don't go nuts with the memory without a really aggressive fan curve. It needs to stay cool all the time. As I recall the temp sensors don't apply to memory. So, it is easy to overheat when overclocked if GPU load is low and memory load is high (usually a mining problem).
https://www.pcworld.com/article/3094984/components-graphics/how-to-use-amds-wattman-the-powerful-new-overclocking-tool-for-radeon-graphics-cards.html

I use Unigine Valley at max settings to stress test a GPU. Superposition may be better. As I recall they got rid of the loop feature in the free version. So, I stick with Valley. Once I have my settings dialed in. I let it run for a few hours to check stability.
 

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