[SOLVED] Questions regarding Ryzen 2700 new built

akaikisaki

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Hello All,

I just upgraded my CPU to a Ryzen 2700 (non X).

I have a few questions regarding the Turbo Boost actually. I know that only 1 or 2 of the Cores gets turbo boosted to 4+ Ghz. My question is how?

At the moment, the maximum boost that I'm achieving is around 3.4 to 3.5Ghz.

I was able to achieve the 4+ Ghz frequency when I changed the power options in Windows 10 to High Performance, both with the windows' High performance and the Ryzen Power Plan. However, by doing that, the EDC (CPU) reading in the Ryzen Master was sitting around 90 to 100% of 90A most of the times.

Though I don't know what EDC means apart from its full form, since it was giving the readings in Red Color, I assumed that it was not a good thing.

So, I changed the power plan to Balanced and the EDC sits around 30 to 50%.


Am I doing something wrong? Is it the same for everyone, i.e. in order to achieve the Turbo Boost Frequency (without Overclocking), we have to change the power plan to High performance, or it will not achieve it.

PS. Bios is untouched at the moment, so everything would be at stock settings with 'Auto' in most of the options.

Thank you.
 
Hey there,

Your both right and wrong :)

Yes, leave the power profile on High performance, and let Ryzen boost/PBO work it's magic, No, don't worry about EDC. Electrical De-sign Current. It's a value the motherboard tells the CPU that's supposed to represent the peak current the VRMs can handle short-term. It will normally be at high percentage usage. PBO will increase that for short periods of time to achieve higher boost clocks, if thermals, cooling allow.

edit: This explains it pretty well: https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/3491-explaining-precision-boost-overdrive-benchmarks-auto-oc
 
Last edited:
Hey there,

Your both right and wrong :)

Yes, leave the power profile on High performance, and let Ryzen boost/PBO work it's magic, No, don't worry about EDC. Electrical De-sign Current. It's a value the motherboard tells the CPU that's supposed to represent the peak current the VRMs can handle short-term. It will normally be at high percentage usage. PBO will increase that for short periods of time to achieve higher boost clocks, if thermals, cooling allow.

edit: This explains it pretty well: https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/3491-explaining-precision-boost-overdrive-benchmarks-auto-oc
 
Last edited:

akaikisaki

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May 16, 2014
127
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Hey there,

Your both right and wrong :)

Yes, leave the power profile on High performance, and let Ryzen boost/PBO work it's magic, No, don't worry about EDC. Electrical De-sign Current. It's a value the motherboard tells the CPU that's supposed to represent the peak current the VRMs can handle short-term. It will normally be at high percentage usage. PBO will increase that for short periods of time to achieve higher boost clocks, if thermals, cooling allow.

edit: This explains it pretty well: https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/3491-explaining-precision-boost-overdrive-benchmarks-auto-oc

Thank you.

Okay, it would seem that I was wrong.
After changing the Plan to High Performance, I noticed that the readings in CPU-Z were fluctuating and was showing 4.1ghz from time to time, however, when running stress tests and monitoring Ryzen master and AIDA64's CPU-ID, the readings were around 3.4Ghz only.

Running Cinebench R20 shows that the processor managed 3.2Ghz and running a stress test in Aida64 and monitoring CPU-ID, it shows that the peak frequency was around 3.4Ghz.

Which tool can I use so that I can see that, 'Yes, the core is boosting to 4Ghz'??

PS.
The cooler is the stock cooler, i.e. Wraith Spire.
 
I use HWMon, but HWInfo is another favourite in the community.

You can monitor clock/boost speeds on the fly. They are quite good for that. It will also show you min/max/current clockspeeds, so as long as you reset each time you want do something, yo'll then be able to see the max boost in each individual core.

Wraith Spire, is pretty damn good as a stock cooler. If you are looking at OC'ing the CPU down the line, then an aftermarket cooler may help keep temps in checl.
 

akaikisaki

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I use HWMon, but HWInfo is another favourite in the community.

You can monitor clock/boost speeds on the fly. They are quite good for that. It will also show you min/max/current clockspeeds, so as long as you reset each time you want do something, yo'll then be able to see the max boost in each individual core.

Okay, so I installed HWMon.
I reset the Min and Max values, and then let it read the Values again. It was showing 4Ghz across all cores in the Max section.

So, does this mean that when the need arises, few of the cores will Auto Clock themselves to 4Ghz even with the stock cooler? Or, even for achieving the Turbo Frequencies, a better cooler would be required.?
 
Yes, that's exactly it. The algorithm the CPU uses to determine boosts is based off thermal headroom, cooling and voltage to the CPU. It's really clever, and happens on the fly in a split second.

Again, you are right. If you have a bigger/better cooler, it's possible the CPU will boost higher.

I've a colleague on Tom's who has a Ryzen 2700x and although the max boost on the CPU is supposed to be 4.3ghz I've seen his go up to 4.5 and 4.6 on two cores. But as I said it,'s task dependent and doesn't happen all of the time. But certainly having a better cooler 'can' allow fro slightly higher boosts, and perhaps more cores boosting.

My own Ryzen 1600x is peculiar too. I have an all core OC of 3.9. So in theory an all core OC like that is supposed to disable any further boost or XFR. But remarkably, my chip still XFR's to 4.0ghz all core from time to time, depending on the load! Which I love :)
 
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akaikisaki

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May 16, 2014
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Yes, that's exactly it. The algorithm the CPU uses to determine boosts is based off thermal headroom, cooling and voltage to the CPU. It's really clever, and happens on the fly in a split second.

Again, you are right. If you have a bigger/better cooler, it's possible the CPU will boost higher.

I've a colleague on Tom's who has a Ryzen 2700x and although the max boost on the CPU is supposed to be 4.3ghz I've seen his go up to 4.5 and 4.6 on two cores. But as I said it,'s task dependent and doesn't happen all of the time. But certainly having a better cooler 'can' allow fro slightly higher boosts, and perhaps more cores boosting.

My own Ryzen 1600x is peculiar too. I have an all core OC of 3.9. So in theory an all core OC like that is supposed to disable any further boost or XFR. But remarkably, my chip still XFR's to 4.0ghz all core from time to time, depending on the load! Which I love :)

That's good to know, thank you so much. :D

The settings in Bios is default at the moment, which means the CPU Voltage is also set to Auto. I've read that the voltages are not supposed to go above 1.45, but I think that's applicable to people OCing manually, right? In my case, since I have not OCed anything, then it is fine for the Voltages to go back and forth to 1.45 since they keep fluctuating and will only hit 1.45 and above for few seconds and will come back down...so it's completely fine, right?

Also, my memory sticks are running at their advertised speed of 2400Mhz without enabling XMP in bios. I should only enable XMP when I plan to Overclock the ram, right? :unsure:
 
The settings in Bios is default at the moment, which means the CPU Voltage is also set to Auto. I've read that the voltages are not supposed to go above 1.45, but I think that's applicable to people OCing manually, right? In my case, since I have not OCed anything, then it is fine for the Voltages to go back and forth to 1.45 since they keep fluctuating and will only hit 1.45 and above for few seconds and will come back down...so it's completely fine, right?
Yes, again, you're right on the money, With auto the CPU voltage can go even higher than 1.45, but as you pointed out it's only for a split second, and it goes back to normal. Nothing to worry about there at all.

VID is the actual theoretical max voltage your CPU should take. You can see this in Coretemp/CPU-z. So for OC'ing purposes, ideally you need your CPU voltage below the VID, otherwise you could begin to decrease the lifespan of the CPU if you were runinng 24/7 with even 1.4v, unless you have a really nice AIO cooler, which could help.

Mostly when OC on Ryzen at least, folks tend keep there CPU voltage as close to 1.3v (and lower if able) as possible. All chips are different though. One could have a steady OC with 1.29v, another might only be able to achieve the same with 1.35. It's a mixed back and requires a lot of testing to get it stable.

On the ram thing, yes, are kinda correct. XMP does allow for faster modules over default speed, which is 2133mhz. Although, technically, faster speed DIMMS like 2933, 3000, 3200mhz are OC versions of the default speeds. XMP allows you to just select an option, and it auto dials in the best settings for the ram. So, although the DIMMS are OC versions, you don't necessarily have to OC them yourself.

I have my 2400mhz DIMMS running at 2733mhz. That's slightly different than XMP. I have to manually OC the ram, by changing timings and mem voltage and test to get stable. My DIMMS are generic, and not XMP. So that's why I have to manually OC.
 
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Just a side-note, and I don't mean to be disrespectful saying it, but your PSU, is a bit on the light side. Not only that it's not a great quality PSU. If it's more than 2 years old, I'd seriously consider changing it. In addition, getting something with slight more wattage would be preferable. A decent 500-550w PSU will serve you well. If that PSU fails, and that particular model can do, specially in modern systems, it can take out some hardware with it. Just be cautious.

Any of Seasonic Focus Plus Gold, EVGA G2/G3, Corsair RMx/RMi/TXM Gold units. THey have 7-10 year warranties, and are made with quality parts.
 
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akaikisaki

Honorable
May 16, 2014
127
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Just a side-note, and I don't mean to be disrespectful saying it, but your PSU, is a bit on the light side. Not only that it's not a great quality PSU. If it's more than 2 years old, I'd seriously consider changing it. In addition, getting something with slight more wattage would be preferable. A decent 500-550w PSU will serve you well. If that PSU fails, and that particular model can do, specially in modern systems, it can take out some hardware with it. Just be cautious.

Any of Seasonic Focus Plus Gold, EVGA G2/G3, Corsair RMx/RMi/TXM Gold units. THey have 7-10 year warranties, and are made with quality parts.

It's fine, no disrespect felt. (y)

I bought this PSU back in 2016, and had it replaced with a new one while it was under warranty in October 2018. My PC was not booting up and I thought the PSU had gone bad, so I had it replaced from the RMA centre. However, it turned out that it was my RAM which was at fault and not the PSU. :tearsofjoy: Nonetheless, I got a new one.

I know that people call the VS series bad. But when I bought it, I didn't know much about PSUs. I was moving from a $7 450W Zebronics PSU to a $33 450W Corsair, and at that time, it felt like a good buy.

The ones that you've mentioned are costly here in India. Would you consider this type to be a good enough PSU?
https://www.amazon.in/Antec-NE650M-650W-MODULAR-PSU/dp/B0716GK7Z6
 

akaikisaki

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Thank you for going through the trouble of searching the PSU. 😇

So the Corsair's CX series are good, will keep an eye on those.

What about the cooler master, like this one?
https://www.amazon.in/dp/B074ZR8D6Q/ref=dp_cerb_1

I'm just assuming that anything with 80+ Bronze should be the minimum buying criteria for PSUs. Gold and Titanium are costlier, so I cannot stretch towards them at the moment.
 
Thank you for going through the trouble of searching the PSU. 😇

So the Corsair's CX series are good, will keep an eye on those.

What about the cooler master, like this one?
https://www.amazon.in/dp/B074ZR8D6Q/ref=dp_cerb_1

I'm just assuming that anything with 80+ Bronze should be the minimum buying criteria for PSUs. Gold and Titanium are costlier, so I cannot stretch towards them at the moment.
The cooler Master is okay. Yes, the difference between the Bronze and GOLD really come down to different quality parts, and higher efficiency. But the Gold units will normally come with a 7-10 year warranty whereas the Bronze Units might only be 3-5 years.
 

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