Question quick question: oc i5 8600k

shadowcat777

Commendable
Feb 23, 2019
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I have a i5 8600k oc at 5ghz with 1.415v
temps in games are fine (usually 65-72c)
I have looked around on google and ppl say different things
Some say that the voltage is not the problem but the heat
others say not to go more than 1.4v
So my question is; Is my oc to 5ghz safe at 1.415v If my temps are fine?
In Prime95 stress test my temps go up to 83 maximum on core
To mention: i have noticed quite high cpu usage in some games like gta V and rust,
can this be because of my OC?
//
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Yeah don't go above 1.35v, IMHO, for that processor. You also need to state what you're using to cool that processor, what your motherboard make and model is(and it's BIOS version) as well as the ambient room air temps.

Overclocking requires both the voltage and temps to be low in order for the platform to run for a longer span of time. You could overclock higher but the CPU will just fizzle out or the motherboard's VRM will give out.
 

shadowcat777

Commendable
Feb 23, 2019
130
1
1,585
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Ok i will put it down at 4.8ghz with 1.335v

another question: Should i keep the voltage as low as possible or is it OK even if you use like 0.01 more than necessary?

added: My motherboard is= z370-p.
I use noctua cooler, which is quite good.
And ofc thermal paste.
 
Last edited:

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
The range you should be in is 1.25v~1.35v, not higher. Lower if your binning of the processor is absolutely funtastic!

Keeping the voltage as low as possible is definitely a good idea but you also need to make sure that the processor/system is stable at those voltages and that your system is functional as well at lowered clocks/volts for your particular tasks/workloads.

Noctua have a number of cooler's under their belt, which one do you have? You've forgotten to answer the other questions asked.
 
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shadowcat777

Commendable
Feb 23, 2019
130
1
1,585
0
The range you should be in is 1.25v~1.35v, not higher. Lower if your binning of the processor is absolutely funtastic!

Keeping the voltage as low as possible is definitely a good idea but you also need to make sure that the processor/system is stable at those voltages and that your system is functional as well at lowered clocks/volts for your particular tasks/workloads.

Noctua have a number of cooler's under their belt, which one do you have? You've forgotten to answer the other questions asked.
I got noctua NH-D15
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
I have a i5 8600k oc at 5ghz with 1.415v
temps in games are fine (usually 65-72c)
I have looked around on google and ppl say different things
Some say that the voltage is not the problem but the heat
others say not to go more than 1.4v
So my question is; Is my oc to 5ghz safe at 1.415v If my temps are fine?
In Prime95 stress test my temps go up to 83 maximum on core
shadowcat777,

This is from our Sticky in the CPUs Forum, but I recommended that you read the entire Guide to get the most out of it. Here's the link: Intel CPU Temperature Guide 2021


Section 8 - Overclocking and Voltage

No two processors are identical; each is unique in voltage tolerance, thermal behavior and overclocking potential, which is often referred to as the "silicon lottery".

Overclocking is always limited by two factors; voltage and temperature.

As Core speed (MHz) increases, Core voltage (Vcore) automatically increases to maintain stability. However, it's not recommended to overclock using “Auto” BIOS settings or motherboard OC tuning features, as significantly more Vcore than necessary is applied to maintain stability, which needlessly increases Power and heat. It's instead highly recommended to use only "manual" Vcore in BIOS. Most overclocking guides explain how. Since overclocked processors can run more than 50% above rated TDP, high TDP air or liquid cooling is crucial.

Each Microarchitecture, which is expressed in "nanometers" (nm), has a “Maximum Recommended Vcore”. For example, it’s important to point out that 22 nanometer 3rd and 4th Generation processors will not tolerate the higher Core voltages of other Microarchitectures.


Here's the Maximum Recommended Vcore per Microarchitecture from 14 to 65 nanometers since 2006:


Figure 8-1

We know that over time, excessive voltage and heat damages electronics, so when using manual Vcore settings in BIOS, excessive Core voltage and Core temperature can cause accelerated "Electromigration". Processors have multiple layers of hundreds of millions of microscopic nanometer scale components. Electromigration erodes fragile circuit pathways and transistor junctions which results in the degradation of overclock stability, and thus performance.

Although your initial overclock may be stable, degradation doesn't appear until later, when increasingly frequent blue-screen crashes indicate a progressive loss of stability. The more excessive the levels of voltage and heat and the longer they're sustained determines how long until transistor degradation destabilizes your overclock. Decreasing overclock and Vcore may temporarily restore stability and slow the rate of degradation. Extreme overvolting can cause degradation in minutes, but a sensible overclock remains stable for years.

Each Microarchitecture also has a "Degradation Curve". As a rule, CPUs are more susceptible to electromigration and degradation with each Die-shrink. However, the exception to the rule is 14 nanometer (nm) Microarchitecture, where advances in FinFET transistor technology have improved voltage tolerance.

Here's how the Degradation Curves correspond to Maximum Recommended Vcore for 22 nanometer 3rd and 4th Generation, which differs from 14 nanometer 5th through 10th Generation:



Figure 8-2

Degradation Curves are relative to the term “Vt (Voltage threshold) Shift” which is expressed in millivolts (mv). Users can not monitor Vt Shift. With respect to overclocking and overvolting, Vt Shift basically represents the potential for permanent loss of normal transistor performance. Excessively high Core voltage drives excessively high Power consumption and Core temperatures, all of which contribute to gradual Vt Shift over time. Core voltages that impose high Vt Shift values are not recommended.

To achieve the highest overclock, keep in mind that for your final 100 MHz increase, a corresponding increase in Core voltage of about 50 millivolts (0.050) is needed to maintain stability. If 70 millivolts (0.070) or more is needed for the next stable 100 MHz increase, it means you're attempting to overclock your processor beyond its capability. All processors reach a limit where an additional increase in Core voltage will not stabilize another 100 MHz increase in Frequency.


Here's an example of a Core Voltage / Frequency Curve:


Figure 8-3
With high-end cooling you might reach your Maximum Recommended Vcore limit before you reach the ideal Core temperature limit at 80°C. With low-end cooling you’ll reach 80°C before your Vcore limit. Regardless, whichever overclocking limit you reach first is where you should stop. Thermal testing is explained in Sections 10 through 12.

Remember to keep overclocking in perspective. For example, the difference between 4.5 and 4.6 GHz is less than 2.3%, which has no noticeable impact on overall system performance. It simply isn’t worth pushing your processor beyond recommended Core voltage and Core temperature limits just to squeeze out another 100 MHz.



CT :sol:
 

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