Question R5 1600X at 4.0 GHz + RX 5700XT Pulse

Jan 23, 2020
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Good Day Guys
I have a problem and i wish you can help me with it.
My Build is having
Ryzen 5 1600x (Arctic freezers esports 34 duo cooler with 2 120mm fans)
Asus ROG strix b350 gaming f
16 GB of Trident Z @ 3000 MHz DDR4 Memory
6 RGB 120 mm Fans
50 cm LED strip
2 led controllers.
I've ordered Sapphire RX 5700XT Pulse and i want to overclock my cpu up to 4.0 GHz and as i investigated, the voltage might be around 1.35v and i really don't know how much wattage required.
with all of these components and OC, will my 5 years old Cooler Maser G650M 80+ bronze PSU, be able to perform well? or i need to upgrade for a new 750 watt PSU?
i'm really confused as some ppl recommend upgrading and some not. i've seen tons of posts and videos that says yes, it will work. however, all new builds are equipped with higher wattage PSU's like 750 or 850 watts
if somebody owns similar configuration and running a similar OC level, please help.
Thanks in advance
 
Hey there,

So, there are a couple of things that you don't have right.

1. The PSU. Whilst 650w is enough, your older PSU may not be up to the task. Specially for overclocking your system. I'd advise a good quality 650w PSU like a Seasonic Focus Plus Gold, EVGA G3, Corsair RMx/RMi. They are made with quality parts and will last 7-10 years with warranty cover. You do not need 750 or anything close to it.

2. The CPU. Your goal of hitting a 4ghz all core overclock are a little high. Most Ryzen first gen top out at 4-4.1ghz and that's with really good cooling and typically vcore at about 1.375 to 1.4v. Hitting 4ghz is not impossible, but it's darn hard to get it stable. I know I have the same CPU. I can hit 4ghz, but my temps hit about 82c on Prime95 stress testing, and it's slightly too high a temp for my liking. For the most part you should keep your stress load temps below 80c for longevity. As a result, I have a 3.9ghz OC with a voltage of 1.3v This is acceptable for me as it keeps the temps around 72-75c stress load. Your current cooler should be okay for the OC, but you have to watch your temps. The point here is you can have an OC of 3.9 with acceptable temps, but loose 100mhz for something that may be really unstable. The 100mhz makes practically no difference in terms of gaming. So settling for a slightly lower OC with much less voltage increase is the way to go.

You need to monitor any OC properly, and try to determine your max temps, at a given voltage, with the speed you set for the CPU. It's a balancing act, and requires a lot of trial and error, so your system is stable with the OC you set.

Here is a great guide to get you started. Read, read, anread it again, and get familiar with your bios : https://forums.tomshardware.com/faq/cpu-overclocking-guide-and-tutorial-for-beginners.3347428/
 
Also, it's worth noting, if you are OC'ing for gaming, this may not be the best option. Doing an all core OC does have it's benefits, For some tasks, it's much better, but mostly this is for multitasking, rendering etc. For gaming though, by letting the Ryzen use it's boost feature and XFR, your CPU can hit 4.1ghz on two cores! So, for the majority of games, this will actually produce slightly better FPS.

With that said, even though I have a 3.9ghz all core OC, sometimes it still XFR's to 4.ghz or a fraction higher on all cores. But this is not always the case, and doesn't happen frequently. It's just something I've noticed while I monitor my PC when gaming.
 
Jan 23, 2020
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Also, it's worth noting, if you are OC'ing for gaming, this may not be the best option. Doing an all core OC does have it's benefits, For some tasks, it's much better, but mostly this is for multitasking, rendering etc. For gaming though, by letting the Ryzen use it's boost feature and XFR, your CPU can hit 4.1ghz on two cores! So, for the majority of games, this will actually produce slightly better FPS.

With that said, even though I have a 3.9ghz all core OC, sometimes it still XFR's to 4.ghz or a fraction higher on all cores. But this is not always the case, and doesn't happen frequently. It's just something I've noticed while I monitor my PC when gaming.
Thanks for all of that info .. you really helped me a lot.
But i may not have the ability to replace my PSU for the time being. and my PC is mainly for gaming.
so, tell me your opinion if:

1. if i overclocked my CPU like for 3.9 ghz (instead of 4.0 ghz) since it is achievable. will my PSU be able to perform?? because yes it is old .. but i only use my PC for like 8 to 12 hours a week. so, it is not heavily used.

2. if i left everything on stock settings. will the PSU perform well? and will i notice any difference while gaming than the OC settings?

sorry, i'm asking a lot but i want to be in the safe side and not feel guilty that i didn't take the advantage of PC components i have.

Thanks again
 
I would just leave at stock, and not push the PSU too hard. It could be okay, but if it goes, it has the potential to fry other components.

The 1600x boosts well with XFR, so it might be worth testing it at stock and see what FPS you get. Try for a moderate OC of 3.8-3.9 and test again. See what the difference is. If there is no difference run it at stock. If there's a difference, then consider a new PSU to power it, before your current one starts to die.
 
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