Question R53600 on b450 4.2ghz

Aug 2, 2019
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Is it possible to OC 3600 on ASUS ROG STRIX B450-E GAMING with H100i platinum RGB, what will be the voltage and will it run stable. Am not talking about the silicon present in it and i will be lucky to push it beyond or not. Am talking about normal r5 3600 what will be the stable clock speed and on what voltage . Have royal 3000mhz 8*2 will be also overclocking it.

Its a new pc am afraid because my mobo doesnt have that good of vrams so i just want to know from pro. what will be the consequence and so on.

Help me
 

PC Tailor

Dignified
Herald
Welcome to the forums my friend!

r5 3600 what will be the stable clock speed and on what voltage
Generally. there is no definitive answer to this. The only way you can really tell is by gradually tweaking the settings yourself and testing. As what I might have stable, will be different to what someone else has stable.

You can see a good guide here for TH testing on the 3600: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-5-3600x-review,6245-2.html

Better VRMs allow for better voltage control of your overclock, and therefore usually better stability.
 
Aug 2, 2019
15
0
10
0
Welcome to the forums my friend!


Generally. there is no definitive answer to this. The only way you can really tell is by gradually tweaking the settings yourself and testing. As what I might have stable, will be different to what someone else has stable.

You can see a good guide here for TH testing on the 3600: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-5-3600x-review,6245-2.html

Better VRMs allow for better voltage control of your overclock, and therefore usually better stability.
Its just that i want to know the average stable clock speed.
 
That's highly individual, even somebody with exact same system can't tel you what yours may do.
With Ryzen specially 2nd and 3rd gen, rule of thumb is that top stable OC is same as it's automatic boost frequency but on all cores. In many cases automatic boost will give you better performance in single core/thread applications because it will be able to boost higher single cores that you could by overclocking all cores. Higher power demand and higher voltages will be required on all cores so VRM might not be able to handle it and actually give you worse performance.
So, you might be able to OC a bit over 4.2GHz but at cost of higher voltage, temperatures and stability and questionable gains.
What you can expect is 4.2GHz at about 1.425v and need to have a cooler that can handle that heat.
 
Reactions: PC Tailor
Aug 2, 2019
15
0
10
0
That's highly individual, even somebody with exact same system can't tel you what yours may do.
With Ryzen specially 2nd and 3rd gen, rule of thumb is that top stable OC is same as it's automatic boost frequency but on all cores. In many cases automatic boost will give you better performance in single core/thread applications because it will be able to boost higher single cores that you could by overclocking all cores. Higher power demand and higher voltages will be required on all cores so VRM might not be able to handle it and actually give you worse performance.
So, you might be able to OC a bit over 4.2GHz but at cost of higher voltage, temperatures and stability and questionable gains.
What you can expect is 4.2GHz at about 1.425v and need to have a cooler that can handle that heat.
what about overclocking the ram module will it be helpful, or it will reduce the lifespan of those ram
 

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