Question R9 Fury + 1st gen i7 860 too much bottleneck?

Jan 13, 2020
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Hey guys, I'm looking forward to buy a new graphics card since yesterday I sold my old GTX 670 to a friend. Now I need to choose between this 2 GPU's:

Gigabyte G1 gaming GTX 970
Sapphire Nitro R9 Fury

Both 4GB of VRAM, The price difference is around 30-35$ bucks, so I'm wondering if the R9 fury is worth the extra dollars and if it will bottleneck too much with my i7 860.

The rest of my pc is the following:

i7 860 @2.8 Ghz
Dell 0c2kjt motherboard
12gb ram ddr3 1333mhz (3x4gb)
Corsair CX600W PSU
Kingston A400 SSD 240GB
Seagate barracuda 500GB HDD
Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO heatsink
3 x 120mm blue led fans
Aerocool Xpredator X1 Black edition Case

I'm planning on playing most modern games, specially warzone in high-ultra settings at 1080p at 60 fps

I was also considering on getting an RX 580 8GB or 1060 6GB but since I don't live on the US, the prices right now are up to the skies. Thanks in advance and Regards. Stay safe.
 

King_V

Distinguished
The R9 Fury is a little bit faster than the GTX 970.

However, it consumes a LOT more power - the GTX 970 is about 150W, whereas the Fury, I think is 275W. I don't think your old CX600W power supply (is it the green label CX? I suspect it might be) will survive that for long. If it is the green-label version, then, honestly, I'm a little surprised that it survived your GTX 670.

Don't worry about bottleneck. That term is so misused as to be meaningless. Ignore any and all "bottleneck calculator" websites because they are complete trash.

Both your CPU and your GPU might struggle a little on the latest and greatest games if you're going for high/ultra at 60fps at 1080p, though I can't speak specifically for Warzone.
 
Reactions: DominatorOne
Jan 13, 2020
4
0
10
0
The R9 Fury is a little bit faster than the GTX 970.

However, it consumes a LOT more power - the GTX 970 is about 150W, whereas the Fury, I think is 275W. I don't think your old CX600W power supply (is it the green label CX? I suspect it might be) will survive that for long. If it is the green-label version, then, honestly, I'm a little surprised that it survived your GTX 670.

Don't worry about bottleneck. That term is so misused as to be meaningless. Ignore any and all "bottleneck calculator" websites because they are complete trash.

Both your CPU and your GPU might struggle a little on the latest and greatest games if you're going for high/ultra at 60fps at 1080p, though I can't speak specifically for Warzone.
Yes indeed, is the CX green label, I've been using it for 2 years now paired with the 670 at the time and I never had problems with it, that's why I thought the cx would be enough for the R9 Fury.

My primary option was an rx 580 8gb or 1060 6gb but they've veen sold out and I don't believe they will be back anytime soon. Problem is if I go for the R9 Fury I won't have any money remain for another psu. Should I keep using the cx600 for now and once I have the opportunity switch it for another one?
 

King_V

Distinguished
The purchase of a better PSU (see the first link in my sig) should take precedence over the video card.

The added power draw of the R9 Fury very likely WILL kill that power supply, but even if it weren't for that, from the link in my sig (this is the full Corsair section):
The orange and black label VS models and the green and black label CX models should be avoided. Completely. Currently we just cannot justify using one of these units. The track record is terrible and if you have one, especially if it is more than a year old, it is probably either already failing or if you are having problems, is likely the reason why. If you don't already have one, avoid them.

The black and gray label VS series units are much better than the older orange and black label VS models, but they are still units you really only want to use with basic use office or internet browsing machines, or in a pinch, maybe a machine with a lower TDP slot powered card. Also, they are not a modern design, having an older group regulated platform which you can find plenty of in depth information about if you do a search for "group regulated power supplies". These are better than any of the units down below in the wall of shame list, and better than the older VS and CX units, but don't assume you that you can simply pair a graphics card that has a 550w recommendation with a 550w VS unit and not have any problems, because in all probability, you will. These units are not meant for use with high demand gaming systems. In a PINCH, for VERY short term use, they will work, but they are not going to last under the rigors of daily gaming loads.

The CXm units are fair. They are "ok" for the price and if the price is right you could do worse. The non-green label "2017" CX models are slightly better than the CXm units. For a budget entry level unit, they are fairly decent. They are not great or fantastic, but they ARE ok, if this is ALL you can possibly afford. Don't buy one of these expecting it to last as long as an RMx or EVGA G2 unit though. It's not going to. It's a good entry level offering and that is all.

The Vengeance models are a small step up from the 2017 CX units.

Aside from that, any of the TX, RM, RMx, RMi, HX, HXi, AX or AXi units are good. Those are listed from good to best, with the best of these Corsair models being the AX and AXi units.
 

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