Question Raid 0 setup on secondary drives

Jan 28, 2020
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Dear All!

I bought a new computer for work, in order to write a lot of data very quickly we were advised to install the OS on an ssd 256 gb and set two extra harddrives (2x2tb WB Black) as RAID 0.

I have Gigabyte B450 AORUS M Socket AM4 motherboard.

I was wondering whether I should install the OS first on the ssd and then in the disk manager merge the other two HDDs into RAID 0 . Or setup RAID from the Bios.

If anyone can give me any advice on how to do this , that would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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What backup routine will be implemented for this?
What type of data is being written to this secondary drive?

For a work system, why not an SSD for primary work space, and then off to HDD for long term storage?
An SSD is faster than 2x HDD in RAID 0.
 
Jan 28, 2020
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What backup routine will be implemented for this?
What type of data is being written to this secondary drive?

For a work system, why not an SSD for primary work space, and then off to HDD for long term storage?
An SSD is faster than 2x HDD in RAID 0.

We have an extra 4 terrabyte harddrive for long term storage. We went with this setup because a 2 TB ssd was a lot more expensive and this should suffice. Its to work with an electrophysiological setup.
 
Jan 28, 2020
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I was advised against buying that, because it's not meant to be very reliable. In any case all the harddrives are already bought and installed, so its a moot point.

I am just wondering about the setting up of the RAID 0, because I have seen contradicting guides online.

I believe I set drives to RAID already (How to Install and Configure Raid Drives (Raid 0 and 1) on Your PCWhen my father told me that he was running his computer in Raid 0, I was confused as to why he would want such a configuration. To my knowledge, running [...]helpdeskgeek.com), then I could not see any harddrives in the windows installer, but apparently thats just a matter of installing raid drivers(https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/B450-AORUS-M-rev-10/support#support-dl-driver-sataraidahci). Ill try that tomorrow. Then I saw that another option is just from within windows in disk manager (https://www.techradar.com/how-to/how-to-combine-multiple-hard-drives-in-raid-0-using-windows-10s-storage-spaces-feature).

So I figured I would ask whether anyone, who has experience with this kind of stuff , has any advice regarding this.

Thanks!
 

USAFRet

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I don't know who told you that, but that specific SSD is one of the most reliable top level drives around.
Second only to A Samsung 860 EVO, and much faster than HDD + RAID 0.

Motherboard/software RAID 0 is not really a good idea.
 
Jan 28, 2020
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I don't know who told you that, but that specific SSD is one of the most reliable top level drives around.
Second only to A Samsung 860 EVO, and much faster than HDD + RAID 0.

Motherboard/software RAID 0 is not really a good idea.

I think i understand the risks, but what is the difference between motherboard and software raid 0? Is one better than the other?
 

Maxxify

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I think i understand the risks, but what is the difference between motherboard and software raid 0? Is one better than the other?
Okay, so if you're doing motherboard RAID it's still software. If you're doing it in Windows Disk Management? Software. Windows Storage Spaces? Yep, software. You can even do it in the BIOS for UEFI with EZRAID/RAIDXPERT - still software!

The differences in choice impact flexibility, compatibility, and to a lesser extent performance. For example, if you do it in Windows - Disk Management or Storage Spaces - you can port it across computers with that OS. If you do it in the motherboard's storage controller's OpROM, you can only move it to a motherboard with the same storage controller (e.g. AMD). But in all cases it's "software" which means it does take some CPU time.

USAFRet is saying that stripe/RAID-0 in general (outside of a hardware implementation - expensive) has inherent risks. If you don't care about the data and want the best performance, it's fine.
 
Jan 28, 2020
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Okay, so if you're doing motherboard RAID it's still software. If you're doing it in Windows Disk Management? Software. Windows Storage Spaces? Yep, software. You can even do it in the BIOS for UEFI with EZRAID/RAIDXPERT - still software!

The differences in choice impact flexibility, compatibility, and to a lesser extent performance. For example, if you do it in Windows - Disk Management or Storage Spaces - you can port it across computers with that OS. If you do it in the motherboard's storage controller's OpROM, you can only move it to a motherboard with the same storage controller (e.g. AMD). But in all cases it's "software" which means it does take some CPU time.

USAFRet is saying that stripe/RAID-0 in general (outside of a hardware implementation - expensive) has inherent risks. If you don't care about the data and want the best performance, it's fine.

Thank you!
 

falcon291

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Jul 17, 2019
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RAID 0 is just for the performance and as a payback you are doubling the failure rate, as when one disk fails all your data is lost.

But if you use that RAID for gaming, it would not be as fast as SSDs of any kind, but yet still it would be faster than a single HDD. And Origin, Steam, Epic Store etc. all are available to download games again in any kind of failure. I used such a configuration mainly for gaming for more than a decade.
 

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