Question RAID 1 Configuration

daf4lifeyt

Prominent
Dec 20, 2017
38
0
530
0
Hey all!
I would like to build a small computer that would have 2 x 500gb HDD. Would it be possible to set those drive in a RAID 1 configuration? So that files such as photos or videos will be copied on both drives in case it fails? And if it does fail, how do you rebuild it or will the data stay?

Thanks
 

daf4lifeyt

Prominent
Dec 20, 2017
38
0
530
0
Hey all, posting here because I posted wrong haha!
I would like to build a small computer that would have 2 x 500gb HDD. Would it be possible to set those drive in a RAID 1 configuration? So that files such as photos or videos will be copied on both drives in case it fails? And if it does fail, how do you rebuild it or will the data stay?

Thanks
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
115,535
2,285
145,090
18,835
Hey all!
I would like to build a small computer that would have 2 x 500gb HDD. Would it be possible to set those drive in a RAID 1 configuration? So that files such as photos or videos will be copied on both drives in case it fails? And if it does fail, how do you rebuild it or will the data stay?

Thanks
Common misconception.
Bottom line - RAID 1 is not a backup, nor a way to safeguard your data.
It is only sort of good to ward off a physical drive fail. And if you actually need 24/7 ops.

Data is written to both drives at the same time. You the user, and the OS, only sees a single batch of files.
Delete, and that file is gone. There is no 'second copy'.

I'm the author of the above linked sticky.
We can go into detail about how to safeguard your data with what you have, or what you might need to add.
 

daf4lifeyt

Prominent
Dec 20, 2017
38
0
530
0
Most people are better off with automated backups. RAID1 only protects against hardware failure of the disk. If you delete a file it is deleted from both disks at the same time. Viruses would wipe out both copies, etc.

This sticky that one of the other moderators wrote is a good background on backups -- https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/what-is-your-backup-situation-at-home.2997205/
Common misconception.
Bottom line - RAID 1 is not a backup, nor a way to safeguard your data.
It is only sort of good to ward off a physical drive fail. And if you actually need 24/7 ops.

Data is written to both drives at the same time. You the user, and the OS, only sees a single batch of files.
Delete, and that file is gone. There is no 'second copy'.

I'm the author of the above linked sticky.
We can go into detail about how to safeguard your data with what you have, or what you might need to add.
RAID 1 is not a backup, it's all about uptime, keeping it running 24x7, have one disk as a backup, have one as the main source. Much safer. RAID won't protect you from viruses, accidental deletion, etc.
Hey,
Thanks for the messages. It's because I used to have HDD with photos and the HDD failed months after and data was lost. I want to have backup of photos obviously but I was thinking into RAID 1. I know that RAID isn't a backup but I would like to build a little computer that would be turned on when needed to access pictures and turned off when not needed. I've seen youtube videos of people creating the sharing things in Windows and I was interested into this as I used online storage but paying monthly is a pain, I would like to pay once and have it near me / maintain it. What do you think? I don't want to go into FreeNAS or something like that but I was looking into WD NAS but expensive.

Thanks
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
115,535
2,285
145,090
18,835
RAID or no RAID, a good backup procedure is what protects your data.
My systems in the house run a backup of each system and drive every night or once a week, depending.
And yes, I've had to recover from a totally dead drive.

What is your budget for this "little computer "?
For that type of use, just about anything will work.
 

popatim

Titan
Moderator
IMO, go with a single internal drive plus a single external drive.

When you add images to the PC/ Internal drive; As soon as it's done you plug in the external and back them up. Eject the external when done, shutdown the system, and unplug the external (USB & Power - in case of voltage spike like a nearby lightning strike). All done and you have a local backup.

Next up - you need to plan for when the house burns to the ground. That's where Cloud storage or a 3rd external drive (that you don't keep at home) comes into play.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS