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Question Raid controlled SATA SSD not recognized by Win10 Disk Management

Jun 28, 2020
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So here's my situation.

I'm configuring a new computer. I started with only my 2 NVMe drives plugged in, set RAID controller in BIOS instead of AHCI, installed windows 10 on one and then formatted the second one in Windows' Disk Management.
I then went and plugged my 3 SATA drives, two 2Tb HDs which I wanted to setup as a RAID1 array, and one standalone 500Gb SSD.
I created the array in BIOS and then formatted it in Windows (in raidxpert2). After this was done, the array showed up in Win10 Disk Management and I formatted it, gave it a letter. Until then no problem.
Except my 500Gb SSD shows up in raidxpert2, in my BIOS as well, but doesn't appear at all in Windows' Disk Management. I went back and initialized it in BIOS, but it's still not showing up. Am I missing something?
Thanks for the help!
 
Jun 28, 2020
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OK so 90 views & 0 response later, apparently no ones knows.

So I'll answer my question myself (because, yes, I found the solution). For AMD systems like mine, when you set up your SATA drives as RAID just initializing the drive is not enough. You gotta create an array no matter what. When creating your array you choose your RAID Level and there are multiple choices (Volume, RAIDABLE, RAID0, RAID1, RAID10).
At first I thought "Volume" was the right one for me, but no. "Volume" allows the PC to consider multiple partitions as a single one, without sharing bandwith or data. It's just a simple merge.
"RAIDABLE" is the right selection for single drives apparently. It simply creates a drive that will be RAID compatible in the future if you decide to make a RAID array with it later. So that's what I did, I created a RAIDABLE array and oh surprise, the drive finally showed up in Windows Disk Management.
Of course I had had the idea before that I could simply create an array with my single drive, but I simply thought there had to be a more elegant solution, and didn't know there was an array option specifically for single drives.

So I wanna thank all of me for this finding! Thanks a lot, that was very helpful!
 

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