[SOLVED] RAM Speed Shown 667 MHz, Not 1333 MHz

4sure

Honorable
Sep 19, 2013
19
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10,510
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Hi there

I have two systems built around the following hardwares:

1). CPU: AMD FX 8350. Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-970A-D3P (Rev. 2.1). RAM: 32 GB DDR3, KINGSTON KVR1333D3N9/8G. OS: Windows 10 Pro, Latest Version. Display Adapter: NVIDIA GeForce G210.

2). Motherboard: ASRock 880GMH/U3S3. The rest is same.

In system 1, upon launching Task Manager>Performance>Memory, the speed of the RAM is shown 667 MHz, not 1333 MHz.

In system 2, the RAM speed is shown 1333 MHz.

Upon using CPU-Z in both of these systems, the DRAM frequency is shown 669.7 MHz.

So what explanation can be given for this difference of RAM speed display in Task Manager?

Both systems have latest BIOS and drivers.

Thanks for your time and attention.
 

boju

Champion
Ambassador
Cpuz reads the true memory clock. DDR (or double pumped) readouts in Windows is sometimes inaccurate. If Windows reading DDR speeds was correct with system 1 then Cpuz would read 333. Times Dram frequency in Cpuz by two.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR_SDRAM

Quote from the first paragraph
The interface uses double pumping (transferring data on both the rising and falling edges of the clock signal) to double data bus bandwidth without a corresponding increase in clock frequency
without a corresponding increase in clock frequency which is the true clock and that's what Cpuz reads.
 

boju

Champion
Ambassador
Cpuz reads the true memory clock. DDR (or double pumped) readouts in Windows is sometimes inaccurate. If Windows reading DDR speeds was correct with system 1 then Cpuz would read 333. Times Dram frequency in Cpuz by two.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR_SDRAM

Quote from the first paragraph
The interface uses double pumping (transferring data on both the rising and falling edges of the clock signal) to double data bus bandwidth without a corresponding increase in clock frequency
without a corresponding increase in clock frequency which is the true clock and that's what Cpuz reads.
 

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