Question Ram suggestions?

Apr 27, 2019
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I have the 2070 gaming Z GPU, Aorus AX-370 MOBO, RYzen 7 2700x CPU, Samsung 860 Evo 1tb SSD and I want to get 32 gbs of 3200mhz Corsair Ram ( 2x16 gbs) any suggestions? I was thinking the Dominator platnium.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
This is the least expensive 32GB, 2 x16GB (Which is what you want. 4 x8GB will likely cause problems, or at least CAN potentially cause problems and on Ryzen will most probably lower the maximum speed at which you can run the memory kit), Dominator Platinum kit available that is COMPATIBLE with your motherboard per the Corsair memory finder utility.

PCPartPicker Part List

Memory: Corsair Dominator Platinum 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($169.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $169.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-26 00:22 EST-0500



Personally, I'd recommend looking at 2933mhz kits or 3000mhz kits and planning to potentially have to manually assign them a 2933mhz speed if they don't automatically do so when you enable the XMP profile, becaaaause, that board shows very little support for 3200mhz sticks AND we know that aside from very high end Samsung B-die equipped modules, 3200mhz sticks tend to not do well on X370 or on 2nd Gen Ryzen in general, but certainly the chances of having success with BOTH X370 AND 2nd Gen Ryzen, even factoring in the improved memory compatibility of the BIOS updates over the last year or so, is going to be low. If you want to do 3200mhz sticks on that configuration, be willing to pay for it. That Dominator Platinum kit is probably the least expensive option that is likely to work.

I've seen a lot more success with G.Skill sticks on Ryzen personally, but then you're going to have to pay for the somewhat more expensive Flare X or Trident Z Neos, and I don't see anything in a 2 x16GB kit in either of those flavors that shows as being compatible with your board on the G.Skill website. Obviously you can use kits that don't necessarily show compatibility on the memory manufacturers website, but the chances of having success when they are not listed usually turns out to be very low or requires a great deal of manual configuration in order to get them to work. Often, they will simply not work, at all.
 
Reactions: Basto13

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
On the M.I.T tab in the BIOS there is a setting for the XMP profile. You just need to enable it. In some cases, a more advanced process of enabling the XMP profile and THEN manually changing the memory speed or various timings might be required, but that is usually only for memory kits that are not explicitly meant for use with that motherboard and/or CPU.

There are plenty of online guides and Youtube tutorials on how to set XMP (Extreme memory profile) settings in the BIOS.

There is also a guide, located here, that has a lot of information that may be helpful to you.

 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Not necessarily "have to get the latest BIOS", but for certain, "check to SEE if you have the latest BIOS version". If you don't then it's a very good idea to do so. You can probably be safe to simply ignore any "beta" versions, but if there is a newer stable release it's a good idea especially on Ryzen chipsets for the purpose of improved memory compatibility if nothing else.


And, unlike "usually" there are some special instructions you need to be aware of when updating your BIOS, "IF" you are NOT already on a newer BIOS version.

If you are on any BIOS version older than F31, then you MUST update to version F31, FIRST.

Then, update to version F50a. If you wish you can follow the instructions outlined in BIOS update version F40 that says to update the EC FW Update Tool before updating to later BIOS versions but I do not believe that is still required because there is no mention of it in the notes or instructions outlined beneath the F50a update.

All are located here:

https://www.gigabyte.com/us/Motherboard/GA-AX370-Gaming-K5-rev-1x/support#support-dl-bios
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Here is what I'd recommend.

Download and update to BIOS version F31. Once you verify that it is stable and working correctly, by being able to POST and then also boot into Windows, THEN do the following.

  1. Boot into Windows OS and download the following zip: https://download.gigabyte.com/FileList/Utility/mb_utility_ecfwupdate_B19.0606.1.zip
  2. Extract it and execute (open) "ECFwUpdate.exe" as an administrator
  3. This will now update your EC Firmware to B19.0517.1 or later
  4. Your computer will reboot on it's own or prompt you to. If neither occurs reboot it once the update is finished.
  5. Sometimes a second segment will launch after your machine reboots right after POSTing - if that doesn't occur disregard this step.
  6. Once that has all been done then
    1. Update your BIOS through Q-FLASH IN THE BIOS to version F50a

I highly recommend that you watch a few videos on updating your bios via Qflash, either on Youtube or on the Gigabyte website, before attempting to Flash the BIOS. It is not a crapshoot like it used to be in the old days. Updating now is fairly simply and safe, but it is STILL a good idea to know exactly what you are doing FIRST, if you have never done so before.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
First, get everything running and make sure it will POST and is able to get into the BIOS. Then, once you are sure of that, go into the BIOS and find the memory section and enable the XMP profile. Save settings, exit BIOS, make sure it will still POST. That's it, other than setting up your various other settings in the BIOS such as fan profiles for the CPU cooler and case fans, and any other custom settings you wish to configure. Then install Windows.

How were you able to update the BIOS with no memory?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No, that's fine. I wasn't aware you already had memory. I was, for some reason, under the impression that this was a system you were in the process of building. You're fine. When you get the new memory and after you install it, I would highly recommend that you use THIS process, for the best chance of a trouble free transition to the new memory configuration. Sometimes the BIOS likes to hold on to older memory settings, so a hard reset ensures that doesn't happen BUT it also means you have to redo any custom settings you had in the BIOS afterwards as well.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
This is the least expensive 32GB, 2 x16GB (Which is what you want. 4 x8GB will likely cause problems, or at least CAN potentially cause problems and on Ryzen will most probably lower the maximum speed at which you can run the memory kit), Dominator Platinum kit available that is COMPATIBLE with your motherboard per the Corsair memory finder utility.

PCPartPicker Part List

Memory: Corsair Dominator Platinum 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($169.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $169.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-26 00:22 EST-0500



Personally, I'd recommend looking at 2933mhz kits or 3000mhz kits and planning to potentially have to manually assign them a 2933mhz speed if they don't automatically do so when you enable the XMP profile, becaaaause, that board shows very little support for 3200mhz sticks AND we know that aside from very high end Samsung B-die equipped modules, 3200mhz sticks tend to not do well on X370 or on 2nd Gen Ryzen in general, but certainly the chances of having success with BOTH X370 AND 2nd Gen Ryzen, even factoring in the improved memory compatibility of the BIOS updates over the last year or so, is going to be low. If you want to do 3200mhz sticks on that configuration, be willing to pay for it. That Dominator Platinum kit is probably the least expensive option that is likely to work.

I've seen a lot more success with G.Skill sticks on Ryzen personally, but then you're going to have to pay for the somewhat more expensive Flare X or Trident Z Neos, and I don't see anything in a 2 x16GB kit in either of those flavors that shows as being compatible with your board on the G.Skill website. Obviously you can use kits that don't necessarily show compatibility on the memory manufacturers website, but the chances of having success when they are not listed usually turns out to be very low or requires a great deal of manual configuration in order to get them to work. Often, they will simply not work, at all.
Alright, so ill buy the Dominator kit and if it works then Cool if not ill lower the mhz to 3000 or 2933 then. Thank you :D
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
That kit should work. Corsair says it is SPECIFICALLY compatible with your motherboard and CPU. You WILL need to enable the A-XMP or XMP profile in the BIOS before it will run at that speed though.
Could you please elaborate more on that please or send a video explaining how to do that?
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
On the M.I.T tab in the BIOS there is a setting for the XMP profile. You just need to enable it. In some cases, a more advanced process of enabling the XMP profile and THEN manually changing the memory speed or various timings might be required, but that is usually only for memory kits that are not explicitly meant for use with that motherboard and/or CPU.

There are plenty of online guides and Youtube tutorials on how to set XMP (Extreme memory profile) settings in the BIOS.

There is also a guide, located here, that has a lot of information that may be helpful to you.

Thank you :)
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
On the M.I.T tab in the BIOS there is a setting for the XMP profile. You just need to enable it. In some cases, a more advanced process of enabling the XMP profile and THEN manually changing the memory speed or various timings might be required, but that is usually only for memory kits that are not explicitly meant for use with that motherboard and/or CPU.

There are plenty of online guides and Youtube tutorials on how to set XMP (Extreme memory profile) settings in the BIOS.

There is also a guide, located here, that has
On the M.I.T tab in the BIOS there is a setting for the XMP profile. You just need to enable it. In some cases, a more advanced process of enabling the XMP profile and THEN manually changing the memory speed or various timings might be required, but that is usually only for memory kits that are not explicitly meant for use with that motherboard and/or CPU.

There are plenty of online guides and Youtube tutorials on how to set XMP (Extreme memory profile) settings in the BIOS.

There is also a guide, located here, that has a lot of information that may be helpful to you.

a lot of information that may be helpful to you.

So to recap that article I have to get the latest BIOS version for my MOBOx then switch over to the XMP settings in BIOS. Anything else im missing?
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
Not necessarily "have to get the latest BIOS", but for certain, "check to SEE if you have the latest BIOS version". If you don't then it's a very good idea to do so. You can probably be safe to simply ignore any "beta" versions, but if there is a newer stable release it's a good idea especially on Ryzen chipsets for the purpose of improved memory compatibility if nothing else.


And, unlike "usually" there are some special instructions you need to be aware of when updating your BIOS, "IF" you are NOT already on a newer BIOS version.

If you are on any BIOS version older than F31, then you MUST update to version F31, FIRST.

Then, update to version F50a. If you wish you can follow the instructions outlined in BIOS update version F40 that says to update the EC FW Update Tool before updating to later BIOS versions but I do not believe that is still required because there is no mention of it in the notes or instructions outlined beneath the F50a update.

All are located here:

https://www.gigabyte.com/us/Motherboard/GA-AX370-Gaming-K5-rev-1x/support#support-dl-bios
Okay so ill go to 31, then to 40( unless you think i shouldnt), then to 50.
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
Here is what I'd recommend.

Download and update to BIOS version F31. Once you verify that it is stable and working correctly, by being able to POST and then also boot into Windows, THEN do the following.

  1. Boot into Windows OS and download the following zip: https://download.gigabyte.com/FileList/Utility/mb_utility_ecfwupdate_B19.0606.1.zip
  2. Extract it and execute (open) "ECFwUpdate.exe" as an administrator
  3. This will now update your EC Firmware to B19.0517.1 or later
  4. Your computer will reboot on it's own or prompt you to. If neither occurs reboot it once the update is finished.
  5. Sometimes a second segment will launch after your machine reboots right after POSTing - if that doesn't occur disregard this step.
  6. Once that has all been done then
    1. Update your BIOS through Q-FLASH IN THE BIOS to version F50a
I highly recommend that you watch a few videos on updating your bios via Qflash, either on Youtube or on the Gigabyte website, before attempting to Flash the BIOS. It is not a crapshoot like it used to be in the old days. Updating now is fairly simply and safe, but it is STILL a good idea to know exactly what you are doing FIRST, if you have never done so before.
Ive updated to F50a, The RAM doesnt come to tomorrow, after installation of the RAM what should i do with the XMP Profile
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
First, get everything running and make sure it will POST and is able to get into the BIOS. Then, once you are sure of that, go into the BIOS and find the memory section and enable the XMP profile. Save settings, exit BIOS, make sure it will still POST. That's it, other than setting up your various other settings in the BIOS such as fan profiles for the CPU cooler and case fans, and any other custom settings you wish to configure. Then install Windows.

How were you able to update the BIOS with no memory?
What do you mean? Im just updating my RAM i already have pre existing RAM, I have 16 gbs of 2400mhz PNY Anarchy X DDR4. Did i do something wrong by alresdy updating BIOS? Was i supposed to do it after i got the RAM.
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
No, that's fine. I wasn't aware you already had memory. I was, for some reason, under the impression that this was a system you were in the process of building. You're fine. When you get the new memory and after you install it, I would highly recommend that you use THIS process, for the best chance of a trouble free transition to the new memory configuration. Sometimes the BIOS likes to hold on to older memory settings, so a hard reset ensures that doesn't happen BUT it also means you have to redo any custom settings you had in the BIOS afterwards as well.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
Okay, can you send me a video link to a way of doing this? Its a lot of material to digest quickly. Thank you!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Nope. I haven't created one yet and that's my own particular "method". Although there are many out there who use this method, SFAIK there are no videos on doing it.

It is, literally, exactly as outlined word for word there. If doing word for word what is outlined there is not clear enough, then I am at a loss as to how anybody is going to help you OR how you are going to manage to do this yourself. That's not being a smart ass, that's just the truth man.
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
No, that's fine. I wasn't aware you already had memory. I was, for some reason, under the impression that this was a system you were in the process of building. You're fine. When you get the new memory and after you install it, I would highly recommend that you use THIS process, for the best chance of a trouble free transition to the new memory configuration. Sometimes the BIOS likes to hold on to older memory settings, so a hard reset ensures that doesn't happen BUT it also means you have to redo any custom settings you had in the BIOS afterwards as well.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
I installed in heading your instructions and it works, now what should i do about the XMP profile, are there specific speeds that I should be going for?
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
Nope. I haven't created one yet and that's my own particular "method". Although there are many out there who use this method, SFAIK there are no videos on doing it.

It is, literally, exactly as outlined word for word there. If doing word for word what is outlined there is not clear enough, then I am at a loss as to how anybody is going to help you OR how you are going to manage to do this yourself. That's not being a smart ass, that's just the truth man.
So i did the User benchmark test and everything preformed really well excepted for the RAM which preformed at 38.6% of how others RAM preformed. Is there any reason for this? I put my RAM in both of the slots next to the CPU so looking from the cpu to the right I put it in Slot 1 and 2 and left 3 and 4 empty.
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
No, you want the memory in slots 2 and 4.

Then, after moving them there, with the power off of course, power on, go into the BIOS and enable the XMP profile.

Okay i put the RAM in slots 2 and 4 and i immediately had troubles with my 2nd monitor which is why i think i had my other ram that way aswell. Restarted and booted up again neither monuto turned on. Shut off and switched RAM back and on first try 2nd monitor still doesnt work, system isnt detecting another display.
 
Apr 27, 2019
99
1
35
0
No, you want the memory in slots 2 and 4.

Then, after moving them there, with the power off of course, power on, go into the BIOS and enable the XMP profile.

Got them both to turn on again in different ports so i guess ill have to leave my RAM in 1 and 2 and XMP from there. I did the CPU-Z application and i got this.
Gyazo.com/2ca8e7bbdd11811637e3908abd4b6c16
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yeah, something is definitely going on.

First off, you purchased a kit, with two DIMMs that came together in one blister pack. Not two separate memory modules that just happened to be the same part number, right?

If the memory won't run while in DIMM slots A2 and B2 (designated as DDR4_1 and DDR4_2 on your board, as seen below), then there is a problem. Either the memory isn't seated correctly, or there is an issue with bent pins on your CPU, or your CPU cooler is mounted improperly with uneven pressure on one side or one corner, or the motherboard is faulty. That's the only choices really.

Lets make sure we have the CORRECT slots being populated first. Then, once you do, try doing a hard reset of the BIOS before attempting to POST or access the BIOS.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.




 

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