[SOLVED] RAM wont work

Djoza

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Apr 5, 2020
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Hi,my friend bought 1 of these:https://www.m4l.com/9995403-056.A00LF-Kingston-Desktop-Memory except he has a 8gb version.
He has this mobo:https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/G41M-P28/Specification
and this cpu:https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/42802/intel-pentium-processor-e5800-2m-cache-3-20-ghz-800-mhz-fsb.html
he is currently running 1x4gb stick of patriot ram:https://www.itsvet.com/proizvod/patriot-4gb-1600mhz-ddr3-signature-psd34g16002h/comp_comp_ram/329/1678
He tried reaplacing that patriot stick with the kingston one and it doesnt post.
what could be the issue?
 

Karadjgne

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It may or may not work. With those older boards it was often a physical limitation of the board because Windows at that time was 32bit (x86 OS) so did not recognise ram in excess of 3.7Gb usable. Wasn't any point in making a consumer motherboard capable of handling server ram loads, that was an unnecessary expense. You'd have to look at what OS was considered compatible, most all OS upto Win7 (longhorn was 64bit (x64)) was the same 4Gb limit. Anything lower, like XP or 98SE, and you could count on 2Gb slots, with single 4Gb max etc.

And that's not including density. Intels ran with low density, single rank ram. AMD could use high density, dual rank ram. So if trying to use the wrong density stick in an intel would often lead to non-working efforts.

What I'd do personally is check with Crucial and/or Kingston websites for your motherboard. They have tables showing you exactly which models will be compatible for the board.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
It may or may not work. With those older boards it was often a physical limitation of the board because Windows at that time was 32bit (x86 OS) so did not recognise ram in excess of 3.7Gb usable. Wasn't any point in making a consumer motherboard capable of handling server ram loads, that was an unnecessary expense. You'd have to look at what OS was considered compatible, most all OS upto Win7 (longhorn was 64bit (x64)) was the same 4Gb limit. Anything lower, like XP or 98SE, and you could count on 2Gb slots, with single 4Gb max etc.

And that's not including density. Intels ran with low density, single rank ram. AMD could use high density, dual rank ram. So if trying to use the wrong density stick in an intel would often lead to non-working efforts.

What I'd do personally is check with Crucial and/or Kingston websites for your motherboard. They have tables showing you exactly which models will be compatible for the board.
 

Djoza

Notable
Apr 5, 2020
1,191
166
940
35
It may or may not work. With those older boards it was often a physical limitation of the board because Windows at that time was 32bit (x86 OS) so did not recognise ram in excess of 3.7Gb usable. Wasn't any point in making a consumer motherboard capable of handling server ram loads, that was an unnecessary expense. You'd have to look at what OS was considered compatible, most all OS upto Win7 (longhorn was 64bit (x64)) was the same 4Gb limit. Anything lower, like XP or 98SE, and you could count on 2Gb slots, with single 4Gb max etc.

And that's not including density. Intels ran with low density, single rank ram. AMD could use high density, dual rank ram. So if trying to use the wrong density stick in an intel would often lead to non-working efforts.

What I'd do personally is check with Crucial and/or Kingston websites for your motherboard. They have tables showing you exactly which models will be compatible for the board.
yeah i checked.It doesnt support it.We will be building him a new ryzen system in september,so its not the end of the world.He just wanted 8gb of ram since its way better than 4gb in modern games.Thanks for the help
 

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