Rambus Binary Pixel Wants to Put Super Camera in Your Phone

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bunz_of_steel

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Rambus memory I recall and it was costly to use.... if same company then nahh. Besides if they have this for Cell phone when are the big boy's like Canon, Nikon, Sony gonna poop one out?
 

curiosul

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[citation][nom]tarzan2001[/nom]Kinda looks like they just turned up the brightness in the images on the right...[/citation]
It's not the brightness, it's called High Dynamic Range (HDR).

[citation][nom]bunz_of_steel[/nom]Rambus memory I recall and it was costly to use.... if same company then nahh. Besides if they have this for Cell phone when are the big boy's like Canon, Nikon, Sony gonna poop one out?[/citation]

This (HDR) is something that ALL camera/sensors manufacturers have ignored competing instead in the ISO/MP areas
 

chicofehr

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The lack of proper optics is what cell phones lack. No matter how good the sensor is, if you got crap optics, the picture wont look as good. A cheap stand alone camera will still do better. When u zoom in a pic taken with any cell camera, u see the difference.
 

fulle

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HDR increases the dynamic range in a picture. This seems to just brighten everything into the same flat lighting, so I think they should change the tech to be called NDR, standing for "No Dynamic Range".
 

CaedenV

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[citation][nom]curiosul[/nom]It's not the brightness, it's called High Dynamic Range (HDR).This (HDR) is something that ALL camera/sensors manufacturers have ignored competing instead in the ISO/MP areas[/citation]
It is not so much that they have ignored it on purpose, it just requires a lot of extra work on the part of the processor, often requiring a completely seperate CPU dedicated to doing HDR for the camera in order to do it in real time. Extra hardware makes for extra cost and lower battery life, and to be honest most consumers care more about those metrics rather than the camera.

That being said, as HDR tech gets better and cheaper we will see more and more of it included in mobile devices, and it makes a HUGE difference at now blowing out bright spots, or blacking out dark areas of a photo. Also, it helps manufacturers to still be able to use smaller cameras while taking pictures because it just takes 2 crappy pictures (one over exposed, and one under exposed) and then blends them together so that you get the detail from both. On the other end of the spectrum you have Nokia who just uses larger cameras and sensors to get a decently high exposure range without the need for the extra processing power, so you sacrifice phone thickness for the sake of keeping the cost down and battery up. But in a few years we will get the best of both worlds, and that will be really nice.

Oh... and to repeat what others have said: Rambus must die! Yes, they make decent products (not great, just decent), but then they talk companies into long term contracts and up the price on future products. Such horrible business practices deserve to put companies out of business, and I never have, and never will buy a product with Rambus equipment in it if I can at all help it. Rambus was the reason my first computer was a Pentium 3 instead of a Pentium 4. Yes, the P4 had the better burst speed and technical specs... but with the P3 I was able to afford to put much more ram in my system (a whole GB if I remember correctly) which (for what I was doing) was way more important than pure speed. Besides, after the initial burst speed PC133 was faster at sustained throughput anyways, so it was a true wash in the end.
 

cyclone44

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Sounds to me like they're positioning themselves to try to collect royalties from anyone who implements HDR in their camera, just like they did with JEDEC and DDR a decade ago.
 

warezme

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Oh no, Rambus is going patent HDR! This process is not knew and I'm kind of surprised high end cameras or anyone hasn't already done this. You don't even need a high end sensor, just maybe a couple of one very fast one that shoots exposure bracketing and then combines them on chip to create..., viola, HDR on the fly. Personally, I have made HDR images and they are hard to make look real because they tend to create flat and unrealistic colored images even though the range is obviously extended. Like in these images. These are best case scenario and still look flat and unnatural.
 
[citation][nom]warezme[/nom]Dang I wish Tom's had an editing function to fix one's typo's[/citation]

Click on the "Read the comments on the forums" hyperlink between the article and the comments section and you can edit posts from there.
 

ta152h

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RAMBUS FTW!!!

Unlike the dweebs here, I love this company. I've made more money on their stock than any other company.

Of course, they sue people. But, most of the Microsoft dorks here forget that Microsoft not only has done a lot of suing, but they also practiced illegal actions that destroyed other products based purely on their market position.

Apple? Are you kidding me? They love litigation. Samsung? Oh no, they've never sued anyone. Nope. Never.

It's how the business world is. The bigger question is if the company has produced good products. Most of the people here are ignorant to the fact that RAMBUS has, time and time again. Maybe not something as obvious as the iPad or iPhone, that revolutionized those industries, but nonetheless less important products that have made a positive impact.

They're not perfect, and some of their lawsuits were pure BS. Like Microsoft, Apple, Samsung, IBM, Oracle, HP, etc...
 
[citation][nom]ta152h[/nom]RAMBUS FTW!!!Unlike the dweebs here, I love this company. I've made more money on their stock than any other company.Of course, they sue people. But, most of the Microsoft dorks here forget that Microsoft not only has done a lot of suing, but they also practiced illegal actions that destroyed other products based purely on their market position.Apple? Are you kidding me? They love litigation. Samsung? Oh no, they've never sued anyone. Nope. Never. It's how the business world is. The bigger question is if the company has produced good products. Most of the people here are ignorant to the fact that RAMBUS has, time and time again. Maybe not something as obvious as the iPad or iPhone, that revolutionized those industries, but nonetheless less important products that have made a positive impact.They're not perfect, and some of their lawsuits were pure BS. Like Microsoft, Apple, Samsung, IBM, Oracle, HP, etc...[/citation]

Rambus has spent much of the lest decade literally living mostly off of BS patents. Maybe other than Apple, none of the other companies did that. Furthermore, no one here was praising MS over Rambus, so I have no idea why you're mocking people for that nor why you even brought them up. You can attack other companies in defense of Rambus, but the others are irrelevant here. Rambus has pretty much been a vampire on the industry. Sure, other companies have done bad things too, but even Apple has done stuff such as kick-start the smart phone market into high gear. Rambus has no such call to fame. Almost all of Rambus's actually good products were never well-utilized. For example, RDRAM was hardly good, it made a huge trade-off between bandwidth and latency and ran ridiculously hot), yet it was one of the few technologies that Rambus really got around and even then, it was ridiculously overpriced.

They have a few excellent technologies (at least for the time) such as RDRAM's successors, XDR and XDR2, but other than the PS3, XDR has not seen much use and I'm not aware of XDR2 having significant use anywhere. Another great product based on them, mobile XDR, would be the best mobile memory even today despite its relative age, yet, again, it is not used. Rambus tried to screw over its customers (both businesses and consumers) to the point where they're more or less ignored by most of the technology industry.

Even for RDRAM, it was almost immediately discarded by DDR once DDR was available. DDR and DDR2 were competitive in bandwidth while having incredibly lower latency and they weren't priced like they were made of solid 24K gold. Rambus took advantage of everyone with lawsuits when businesses and consumers decided that they didn't want to pay ridiculous prices for Rambus's own memory.

There is a very obvious line between imperfection and extreme greed or whatever else BS motivated them to act how they did. There is also a difference between suing others for no good reason and suing others in defense and/or other legitimate reasons (Samsung, for example, hardly dealt with litigation until Apple went crazy over not being top dog anymore, which is kinda funny since that was just as much Apple's fault for not continuing to improve properly to begin with).
 
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