Question Random crashes - troubleshooting advice

May 24, 2019
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Hi everyone,

I've seen a couple of posts regarding similar but not quite identical issues.

I recently built a computer and occasionally for no detectable rhyme or reason the PC seems to crash. This can happen anytime from when I'm running an intensive video game to just browsing online or checking email.

When this happens, the displays (I have dual monitors) lose signal and go black/turn off. Initially I thought it was a graphics card problem but disconnecting and reconnecting the cables or pressing ctrl+windows+shift+b to restart the display does not work.

I'm guessing it's still on because the fans continue to run and the motherboard lights stay on.

However, something very strange happens as well. Whenever I get these crashes, I am unable to power off the PC by holding the power button down or clicking the reset button. The reset and power button work fine at any other time. Whenever this happens I have to physically shut the computer off via the button directly on the power supply.

For info purposes - build is as follows:

CPU: Ryzen 5 1600
CPU Cooler: Hyper 212 LED
Motherboard: Asus - Prime X470-Pro ATX AM4
RAM: Corsair - Vengeance RGB Pro 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory: Model CMW32GX4M2C3000C15
GPU: MSI - GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11 GB AERO OC
PSU: Corsair HX850 HX Platinum 850 W 80+ Platinum Ce
Storage: Samsung 1TB SM961 Single Sided Polaris V-NAND MLC 80mm (2280) M.2 PCI Express 3.0 x4 (PCIe Gen3 x4) NVMe OEM SSD - MZVKW1T0HMLH
Case: Cougar MX-330G (I have also tried on CoolerMaster MC500P and it does the same thing)

(also have 2 other HDD i would need to check for actual model#'s).

Any idea where to even begin troubleshooting?

Thanks everyone!
 
First and foremost, let's try to rule out any firmware and software issues. Update the BIOS, uninstall your display drivers using an app called DDU, then reinstall the latest drivers for your GPU from NVIDIA's website, and if none of these work, try reinstalling Windows.
 
May 24, 2019
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Hmm, seeing as I just built the PC (did not transfer/copy over Windows partition) would that still be the recommended approach? Couldn't I do something similar by running Linux of USB and running stress test for example (to determine if the OS Install is the issue)?
 
Hmm, seeing as I just built the PC (did not transfer/copy over Windows partition) would that still be the recommended approach? Couldn't I do something similar by running Linux of USB and running stress test for example (to determine if the OS Install is the issue)?
Don't take this the wrong way, but you can either ask for help online and listen to those helping, or you can solve the problem yourself - a combination of the two will unnecessarily complicate troubleshooting.
 

ConanLock

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May 22, 2019
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For both of you, I'd recommend uninstalling all and any GPU drivers via Control Panel on your PC, then download and install the newest drivers from the official site of either AMD or Nvidia, depending on your GPU. Do not use the ones from the disc, and do not use automatic driver uninstallers or installers to do this.
 
For both of you, I'd recommend uninstalling all and any GPU drivers via Control Panel on your PC, then download and install the newest drivers from the official site of either AMD or Nvidia, depending on your GPU. Do not use the ones from the disc, and do not use automatic driver uninstallers or installers to do this.
DDU is always recommended for uninstalling display drivers because it cleans up better than a simple uninstall. Display drivers that aren't working properly need to be completely removed before trying to install a different driver, otherwise the residuals can make the problem stay even after the uninstall. It's a fairly trusted app, which is why it recommended by most people on these forums.
 

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