Mar 12, 2020
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Hello everyone! Ever since about 4 months ago, I had started to experience connection issues (Predominantly while playing games, which makes up most of what I do on my computer) and those connection issues seemed to be packet loss related.

First, I had thought it may be a problem with my older router which would sometimes completely drop the WiFi connections and not connect back until you reset it about 5 times, so I got a new router, which fixed the complete WiFi drop problem, but did not get rid of the random packet loss spikes.

I would assume that these lag spikes I get in games and programs like CS:GO, Call of Duty, Discord, etc., is packet loss because I have enabled network status settings in those games to see what was happening, and when ever I would be lagging, or disconnecting from the game, my ping was not rising, but my packet loss percentage was spiking.

For example, in CS:GO (And most other games) I will randomly (Sometimes 5 times in one game, and sometimes 3 times in 5 games, it seems pretty random) have a full freeze 4-5 second lag spike, return to normal and then about 3-4 seconds later I will have another 2 second full freeze lag spike. The durations and timings of the lag spikes are very consistent and are almost the same every time.

I have tried using both my 5ghz and 2.4ghz WiFi but I experience the same problem with both, and the 5ghz is just faster in general by a lot. I am not close to my router at all, so I cannot use Ethernet, and I must use WiFi. Any feedback or tips are appreciated, and also feel free to ask any further question if I forgot to add something or extra clarification is needed.
 
You need to test on ethernet to see if you have some issue with your pc or the actual internet connection. These sometimes are easier to fix than any wifi issue.

It is surprising you do not see latency/ping spikes in addition to the packet loss. This also tends to make me suspect it is not wifi but you need to test to be sure.

Wifi you have almost nothing you can do. You have done all the common things like change the radio band or radio channel. You can update the wifi nic driver but highly unlikely that will do anything. Maybe try to turn the machine around in your room will change the path slightly the radio waves take.

In most cases this is caused by the signal being damaged between you and the router. Most times it is interference from outside your house (ie your neighbors wifi). There is very little you can do about this.

Not sure what to suggest. You could try stuff like replacing the wifi nic but that too is not likely to help. The best option if you are going to spend money is to buy powerline networks or even MoCA devices and not use wifi.
 
Reactions: Phillip Corcoran
You need to test on ethernet to see if you have some issue with your pc or the actual internet connection. These sometimes are easier to fix than any wifi issue.

It is surprising you do not see latency/ping spikes in addition to the packet loss. This also tends to make me suspect it is not wifi but you need to test to be sure.

Wifi you have almost nothing you can do. You have done all the common things like change the radio band or radio channel. You can update the wifi nic driver but highly unlikely that will do anything. Maybe try to turn the machine around in your room will change the path slightly the radio waves take.

In most cases this is caused by the signal being damaged between you and the router. Most times it is interference from outside your house (ie your neighbors wifi). There is very little you can do about this.

Not sure what to suggest. You could try stuff like replacing the wifi nic but that too is not likely to help. The best option if you are going to spend money is to buy powerline networks or even MoCA devices and not use wifi.
 
Reactions: Phillip Corcoran

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