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Question Random Problems. Need help

ChronoGlenn

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May 23, 2012
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I am having random problems with my PC, starting with several random BSODs and a memory dump stating error SYSTEM_THREAD_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED, but I cannot check where the exception occurred since the memory dump has no other valuable information. My specs:
  • MB: Gigabyte GA-H61M-S1
  • CPU: I5 2500
  • GPU: Gefocer 1050 TI
  • RAM: 2x 4gb Corsair Vengeance
  • PSU: Seasonic 520w
  • Storage: SSD (1x), HDD (1x)
I've tried:
  • Testing with MemTest and HDD diagnostic tools, receiving no errors
  • Removing the SSD and booting only with the HDD, which worked for a couple of days, however upon a reboot, it booted but without video; I changed out the cable from my monitor to the integrated GPU and it worked again, so I removed my GPU, cleaned up, and it worked again
  • When I tried to play a game, another freeze occurred, and, after rebooting, I only have 4GB of RAM; I removed both RAM DIMMs, cleaned up, and have 8GB again, but now without the GPU
I suspect the PSU or motherboard is the issue and replaced the PSU with a Corsair CX500 [from another machine] and the PC didn't boot - fans started, but no beeps from the speaker:
  • I tried again with the Seasonic, integrated graphics, and a Windows install USB, which worked, connected only the SSD, and upon booting, the SSD is not recognized. I changed the SATA port on my motherboard and the SSD worked.
Besides the PSU and GPU, I don't have any spare hardware to test and am thinking it can only relate to the motherboard. Am I assuming correctly?
Is it more likely to be a motherboard issue or could it be related to something else?
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

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Moderator
Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes, warnings, and informational events that correspond with the times of the BSODs.

Multiple and/or varying errors are a sign of a failing PSU.

How old is that Seasonic PSU?

Heavy use for gaming or video editing?
 

ChronoGlenn

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Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes, warnings, and informational events that correspond with the times of the BSODs.
I received just one message, with the error SYSTEM_THREAD_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED, which is related to the driver, but I didn't get any information about which driver. All other BSODs didn't have any message, just the usual "Windows Was Not Properly Shut Down" in the Event Viewr

Multiple and/or varying errors are a sign of a failing PSU.

How old is that Seasonic PSU?
I know, but when I changed the PSU, the machine didn't even boot, all fans started, but with no response, no beeps.
That's why I started to think about motherboard.
The Seasonic PSU is old, six, five years old.

Heavy use for gaming or video editing?
It's an old machine, my brother uses to play some games, LOL, DOTA and Path of Exile, nothing new.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
""Windows Was Not Properly Shut Down" in the Event Viewr " - loss or interruption of power somewhere.

Any power problems in your area, home, room? What is the power path from wall outlet to PC? Any surge protectors, power strips, etc.?

Could even be before the wall outlet. However, in most cases you probably would have noticed other electrical problems. Still think about it all as a matter of elimination.

= = = =

A PSU provides three voltages (3, 5, 12) on varying "rails" that provide power to different components.

What can happen, as a PSU ages and begins to fail, is that one or more voltages may go out of spec and/or intermittently even stop being delivered to host computer components.

So some things may run and others not so much.... Or performance goes "on and off".

The problem could indeed be the motherboard but you can do some additional testing with regards to the PSU's.

Do you have a multi-meter and know how to use it? Or have a family member or friend who does?

FYI:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158

Test both PSU's.

Not a full test as the PSU is not under load. However any voltages out of tolerance make the PSU all the more suspect.

Plus if you mixed and matched cables/splitters, adapters, etc. between the PSU's some common but faulty cable/adapter could be involved.

Just FYI:

https://turbofuture.com/computers/How-to-Tell-When-Computer-Power-Supply-Is-Failing#:~:text=Inside a computer, a PSU,the components inside the case.

https://www.logixconsulting.com/2020/08/11/5-signs-your-computers-power-supply-is-failing/

You may recognize other related issues and problems mentioned in the two links above.

And you can easily find other similar links for both more information and more detailed information.

PSU(s) remain, in my mind, as the primary suspects.
 

ChronoGlenn

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Any power problems in your area, home, room? What is the power path from wall outlet to PC? Any surge protectors, power strips, etc.?
I'm using a surge protector. And when I changed the PSU for a test, I even changed the surge protector. I don't think it's an electrical problem.

What can happen, as a PSU ages and begins to fail, is that one or more voltages may go out of spec and/or intermittently even stop being delivered to host computer components.
I was thinking exactly this, but when I replaced the PSU with a newer one, and the machine didn't even boot, just started the fans, I became very confused.
Corsair PSU is not new, it is just newer than Seasonic.

Do you have a multi-meter and know how to use it? Or have a family member or friend who does?
I will get a multi-meter tomorrow and do more tests
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Yes, the fan spins which is necessary for cooling. I cannot really determine if the fan speed is slower or faster.

The voltages are what are important.

And the voltages testing OK is good but remember that the PSU is not under load.

Did you test both PSU's?

You really need to obtain another known working, at heavy loads, PSU.
 

ChronoGlenn

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May 23, 2012
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Did you test both PSU's?

You really need to obtain another known working, at heavy loads, PSU.
I didn't test it, I was using my other machine to learn how to use a multimeter and test the PSU.
And that machine is working flawless, and sometimes with a heavy load. And since that machine needs more power, it uses a Radeon R9 380, I imagine that the Corsair PSU is fine.

I can't undertand why the Corsair PSU did not work with my Gigabyte motherboad.
Do you know any way to test the motherboard ?
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
You cannot just imagine.

There are numerous factors involved and some problems are intermittent....

Testing, even if limited, is necessary to gain some level of certainty with what is going wrong.

For the most part running motherboard tests are a last resort after all other possibilities are eliminated.

Testing, however, may end up doing more harm than good if you are not careful.

Here is a link to get you started:

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/motherboard-bench-testing.3614539/

There may be other ideas and suggestions.
 

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