Randy Fromms sells untested chassis

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If this is true, what kind of "class" is this? I would expect he'd go
through all monitor models. -Marcel
 
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"Havokmon" <rick@havokmon.com> wrote in message
news:1112292559.c5b7f7681ae53ff625d9ce457cb04f79@1usenet...
> On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 17:43:59 +0000, Mark C. Spaeth wrote:

>>
>> 1/2 the monitors/chasses I brought in left dead as they came... *shrug*
>
> You know, that just tells me to not even worry about fixing chassis.
> Just buy a new one, even if it is a cheapo brand.

Wrong assumption. Monitors are usually very very simple fixes; even if you
throw out the hard ones, you are still way ahead learning to fix your own.
I would start with the G07, learn the cap kit, learn how to spot and change
a bad flyback, and learn what solder connections should be redone in the
vertical. That small bit of knowledge will enable you to fix around 80% of
your G07 chassis; as I said, even if you junk 1 in 5 because you dont want
to take the time to pursue harder fixes, you're way ahead and in addition
will have the satisfaction of learning some repairs.
Next easiest (again, in my opinion) are the Sanyo chassis used in Nintendo.
A surprisingly large percentage of failures are due to a single 10uf 160VDC
cap in the vertical, which can be bridged without removing the chassis and
cures the shrunken top with the retrace lines in the picture symptom.
Another common one is the caps and transistors on the audio board failing
and taking out the sound.

Look into learning to resolder the daughter board connectors on the WG4600s
and you will fix around half to 2/3 of the ones you run across; do the cap
kits while they are apart and you should be able to fix 3/4 of them/

It would be worth it to learn a few repairs; parts are cheap, and if you are
careful you can be sure you get a quality job. Try not to get discouraged
with your first few or few dozen repairs - once you get the knack of
learning how to learn the repairs knowledge will come quickly. Email me for
specific problems if you want to get jump started on a few.

Art
 
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I had a nonworking chassis, broken tube and all, and with a little
advice from some people here (including Art), I got it up and running,
and did the cap kit. I am far from an electronics guru, so if I can do
it, I suppose almost anyone can, as long as you're careful and follow
common sense.
 
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On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 23:08:53 -0600, "anonebayseller" <anon@seller.com>
wrote:

>You can get new WeiYa replacement chassis for under $60 including shipping
>for 13 to 27" tubes from a couple of places online. Why waste time fixing
>the old stuff. Time = Money.

$5 in parts per chassis: Money = Money
Same amount of time to remove & replace chassis.
Cap kit only takes an hour (or less) = very little time saved.

Follow Art's advice and learn how to do it. Stress relief and reward
for doing it yourself make up for small loss of time.

Randy's providing parts. He knows how to fix them, but his time means
something too. Be glad he's offering some needed parts (w/bonuses, if
you read the whole auction description) that he has no use for at a
good opening bid price.

Rick