Question Rare CPU Problem

Jun 4, 2020
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Hello everyone, I have a problem with my CPU. I have an AMD FX 6300 and my problem is that it go to 4.1 GHZ or 3.8 depend of the windows energy save. It's all the time in the same clock, and I don't know why because I never tried to overclock or something like that, I only activate XMP in BIOS to reach in 1600 mhz in my dual chanell memory. I have enabled cool n' quiet, turbo core, etc. Really I don't know what can be, I don't want the cpu at max clock meanwhile I'm watching a movie for example. Thanks to everyone, my specs are:
AMD FX 6300
AMD RX 570 4GB MSI
ASUS M5A97 LE 2.0
2x4 GB KINGSTON 1600 mhz stock and 1800 mhz
Corsair CV 550
There is a image of cpu monitor:



I'm waiting for your help, thanks and sorry for my bad english. Im from Argentina.
 

MadsModsat

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Oct 10, 2019
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There's not really anything wrong with the CPU going to max frequency, it is still the amount of load on the CPU which would primarely generate heat.

So max frequency when watching a video isn't a problem really, it just gives you improved performance.

But if it is at max load at the same time as max frequency while watching a video, for example, that's different and could be an issue due to the possible high temperatures which would speed up the CPU fans to increase cooling efficiency, potentially being noisy while silence would be better when watching a video.

Also, max load while doing simple things as watching video, could indicate that another process or porcesses are putting a lot of load on the CPU, possibly background tasks or maybe even malware...

Max frequency doesn't indicate the CPU works hard, but it gives the best performance for the task being currently processed by the CPU.

Max load is when the CPU is being pushed.

What kind of problems are you having as a result of the high frequency, since you want to reduce it?


My own CPU is constantly boosting to different frequencies, even max frequency under just a few percent load, or when sitting idle at desktop or under very light load such as using a web browser.

It is quite normal for most current CPUs - and there's nothing in your images that immediately stands out to me as abnormal or out of spec..

Temperature is good, the frequencies reported by the software you are using, show a CPU boosting to its various frequencies to provide best possible performance for the tasks the CPU is currently executing.
No core has been under more than 18% load

In short : To me, the pictures you've posted, look completely normal
 
Last edited:
Jun 4, 2020
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There's not really anything wrong with the CPU going to max frequency, it is still the amount of load on the CPU which would primarely generate heat.
So max frequency when watching a video isn't a problem really, it just gives you improved performance, but if it is at max load at the same time as max frequency while watching a video, for example, that's different and could be an issue due to high temperatures which would speed up the CPU fans, potentially being noisey while silence would be better when watching a video.

Also, max load while doing simple things as watching video, could indicate that another process or porcesses are putting a lot of load on the CPU, possibly background tasks or maybe even malware...

Max frequency doesn't indicate the CPU works hard, but it gives the best performance for the task being currently processed by the CPU. Max load is when the CPU is being pushed.

What kind of problams are you having as a result of the high frequency, since you want to reduce it?
Thanks for your anwer, there are my problems
1: I don't know why the CPU go to 4.1 ghz if 3.8 ghz is the maximum stock core. Looks like an unexpected overclock, because the cores go to 4.1 ghz to 3.8 ghz and 3.5 ghz again and again
2: I'm not sure if it reduce the life of my CPU or not. For example: If I let my pc ON all the night downloading something, I think isn't necesary to be at full clock speed.
3: I was reinstalled windows 1 week ago, and I think the problem start from here. I remember the core clock sometimes around 2.4 ghz when I'm not playing or doing something that requires more.


I'm not an expert in PC you can see it haha, sorry
 

MadsModsat

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It is not really the core clock / frequencies that wear out a CPU, it is heat generation and excessively high voltages.

If your CPU got alarmingly hot at full load, that would be harmful to the CPU. But max frequency under very little load and decent temperatures, is not actually a problem - it is a bonus.

Your photos show the CPU currently hasn't got any core being utilized more than ~18%, which is ok.
The CPU doesn't seem to run hot, although the FX CPUs only really have one piece of software which can provide accurate temps, as far as I understand.

If your CPU was incredibly hot under heavy load - or even critically hot at idle - it would decrease the CPU life-span, but the maxium frequency doesn't damage the CPU.

But if the max frequencies are way out of specifications, it could cause system instability, which is a different problem.

But you don't really mention any critical or potentially damaging issues you are experincing. As far as I can understand, your main concern are the frequencies and not actual system instability or random system crashes - or overheating.

From the information you posted above, your CPU is perfectly safe and is behaving normally as expected - even as it is designed to do.

A cool CPU at constant max boost frequency and various load conditions, would have a similarly normal life expectancy as an equally cool CPU at lower frequencies and various load conditions.

Extreme heat and excessively high voltages causes fatal damage to a CPU.

However, I'm not sufficiently familiar with AMD FX CPUs to offer a suggestion to why you see the increased max boost frequency, but it could be a BIOS setting or some type of AMD software I'm not familiar with - someone else would have to offer you advice in that regard :)

EDIT:

But adjusting the "Turbo Boost Index"-slider, will likely change CPU boost behaviour - and the resulting max boost frequencies - so maybe that is set to a different setting than before you reinstalled Windows recently.

But remember, the CPU is also performing other tasks than the programs you run. A high CPU frequency helps execute a command as quickly and efficiently as possible.

The high frequencies you sometimes see, but you don't feel are neccessary, may also be caused by active background processes, that are "hidden" to you (unless you go to task manager).

So a high boost clock, even for certain light tasks, is actually somthing you want for the computer to run efecciently and smoothly - as long as the behaviour is not abnormal and the system temperatures etc are otherwise within specification and the computer is stable.
 
Last edited:
Jun 4, 2020
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It is not really the core clock / frequencies that wear out a CPU, it is heat generation and excessively high voltages.

If your CPU got alarmingly hot at full load, that would be harmful to the CPU. But max frequency under very little load and decent temperatures, is not actually a problem.

Your photos show the CPU currently hasn't got any core being utilized more than ~18%, which is ok.
The CPU doesn't seem to run hot, although the FX CPUs only really have one piece of software which can provide accurate temps, as far as I understand.

If your CPU was incredibly hot under heavy load - or even critically hot at idle - it would decrease the CPU life-span, but the maxium frequency doesn't damage the CPU.

But if the max frequencies are way out of specifications, it could cause system instability, which is a different problem.

But you don't really mention any critical or potentially damaging issues you are experincing. As far as I can understand, your main concern is the frequencies and not actual system instability or random system crashes - or overheating.

From the information you posted above, your CPU is perfectly safe and is behaving normally as expected - even as it is designed to do.

A cool CPU at constant max boost frequency and various load conditions, would have a similarly normal life expectancy as an equally cool CPU at lower frequencies and various load conditions.

Extreme heat and excessively high voltages causes damage to a CPU.

However, I'm not sufficiently familiar with AMD FX CPUs to offer a suggestion to why you see the increased max boost frequency, but it could be a BIOS setting or some type of AMD software I'm not familiar with - someone else would have to offer you advice in that regard :)

EDIT:

But adjusting the "Turbo Boost Index"-slider, will likely change CPU boost behaviour - and the resulting max boost frequencies - so maybe that is set to a different setting than before you reinstalled Windows recently.
Okay, you are chilling me about that haha. Now here is on winter and temp are ok, but when the weather gets hot It can change all. For it I was sacred hahaha
So.. the real problem isn't the max core clock I understood. The problem now is the 4.1 ghz unexpected overclocking without voltage management, that can cause inestability right? I will check the Bios again, thank you man you are great. If someone can tell me how to solve that problem, i'll really apreciate that.
There is another screenshot:
 

MadsModsat

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According to various information found in a Google search, there's a "Turbo Core" option for the AMD FX 6300, which enables it to boost to 4.1 GHz - this is perfectly normal.

So from what you have posted above, if Turbo Core is enabled in BIOS, your post actually describes exactly the way an AMD FX6300 is supposed to run, at least according to the information I'm aware of.

Some mentioned, that depending on what Windows Power Plan you use, the minimum boost clock can be different (depending on minimum processor state and maximum processor state settings apllied in the specific power plan)

But all the clocks you mentioned, from 3500MHz to 3800MHz to 4100Mhz, is actually what you should expect to see when your PC is in use, with the CPU you have.

Balanced Windows Power Plan should be fine for an AMD FX 6300, as far as I can understand from other posts online.

If your CPU would ever reach a critically high temperature, at first it would down-clock (thermal throttle) to lower the temperature, if that is not enough, the computer would completely shut down to protect the CPU.
So your CPU won't just suddenly die due to overheating - a (lentgthy) process with various problems would come ahead of a possible final catastrophic failure (which is not that common - it would likely become unstable more than a complete failure).

Your computer's performance would clearly indicate if your CPU is generally running too hot. The computer would become unstable, and likely crash randomly or become unusually slow due to thermal throttling.

If you find our your CPU is overheating, which I don't suspect, you would have time to react and improve the case airflow or upgrade the CPU cooler, before the CPU is critically damaged. Don't be too woried everything suddenly goes completely wrong with the CPU, it sounds like you are completely fine.

You haven't mentioned anything that makes me suspect your CPU isn't sufficiently cooled, so to be honest, the way you describe your computer in your posts above, you should relax and be satisfied that your CPU actually behaves and performs as it is intended to do by default design ;)

I personally can't identify any abnormal issues or critical problems by the information you have provided so far - you should just continue to enjoy your computer ;)

EDIT : Link to a review describing the 4.1 GHz Turbo Core max frequency
 
Last edited:
Jun 4, 2020
4
0
10
0
According to various information found in a Google search, there's a "Turbo Core" option for the AMD FX 6300, which enables it to boost to 4.1 GHz - this is perfectly normal.

So from what you have posted above, if Turbo Core is enabled in BIOS, your post actually describes exactly the way an AMD FX6300 is supposed to run, at least according to the information I'm aware of.

Some mentioned, that depending on what Windows Power Plan you use, the minimum boost clock can be different (depending on minimum processor state and maximum processor state settings apllied in the specific power plan)

But all the clocks you mentioned, from 3500MHz to 3800MHz to 4100Mhz, is actually what you should expect to see when your PC is in use, with the CPU you have.

Balanced Windows Power Plan should be fine for an AMD FX 6300, as far as I can understand from other posts online.

If your CPU would ever reach a critically high temperature, at first it would down-clock (thermal throttle) to lower the temperature, if that is not enough, the computer would completely shut down to protect the CPU.
So your CPU won't just suddenly die due to overheating - a process with various problems would come ahead of a possible final catastrophic failure (which is not that common - it would likely become unstable more than a complete failure).

Your computer's performance would clearly indicate if your CPU is generally running too hot. The computer would become unstable, and likely crash randomly or become unusually slow due to thermal throttling.

You haven't mentioned anything that makes me suspect your CPU isn't sufficiently cooled, so to be honest, the way you describe your computer in your posts above, you should relax and be satisfied that your CPU actually behaves and performs as it is intended to do by default design ;)

I personally can't identify any abnormal issues or critical problems by the information you have provided so far - you should just continue to enjoy your computer ;)

EDIT : Link to a review describing the 4.1 GHz Turbo Core max frequency
You are a genius man!! It's real, I trusted in the official AMD page that says the max clock is 3.8 on turbo, a big mistake hahaha. Thank you again and again man! You really want to help the people!
 

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