Question Rather Specific Motherboard/OS Upgrade Question

one-called-kane

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Oct 8, 2013
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My old motherboard recently bought the farm, so later this week it's getting an upgrade (ASUS z170 to AsRock z270), but that is neither here nor there. My main concern is the effect this change will have on my OS as I am currently running Windows 7 and I know that a reinstall of some kind will almost certainly be necessary. My issue is that there is a certain amount of data that I would rather not lose that I have rather stupidly kept installed on my OS drive.

My questions are thus:
  1. What would be the least painful way to go about reinstalling windows onto this drive (preferably without losing the data I want to save)?
  2. Will there be any opportunity to backup the SSD the OS is installed on before the new windows installation obliterates it?
  3. Will doing the Windows 10 upgrade at this time help smooth out this process in any way, or is it simply convenient to do that now rather that wait? (I have a Windows 7 USB Somewhere(tm), but I am not certain where, and if I cannot find it I will probably need to upgrade anyways)
I appreciate the help, apologies if this is similar to others but there didn't seem to be any other topics with the same combination of issues (dead mobo / windows upgrade / data recovery) and I'd like to have as much data as possible before I set about wreaking havoc.
 

Achint2000

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Feb 10, 2013
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I personally hate Windows 10. Will use Windows 7 forever. I had this same issue a long time ago when I did a new build.

So, use a sector by sector backup tool to back the OS up. from any comp you have access to.
I used EaseUS Todo Backup. Keep the backup with you anyway. It's always good.

There are 3 ways:
  1. Simple - If you want Win7 - Simply reinstall Windows 7 from step 1, use backup to copy all your data.
  2. Quite Complicated - Buy a new drive (HDD or SSD) and keep the old drive connected. Use LinkShellExtension to make junctions to the old drive to all personalized user folders.
  3. Bite the bullet. Take a backup and install Windows 10. Set it up as a new system but with all your old data (like pictures, docs, downloads, etc)
Then there are a lot of steps.
• See all the programs you had on the current build and install them all one by one.
• Update DirectX, install .NET Framework, install ALL versions of VisualC++ (because Win7 is old)

• You yourself can copy all downloads/desktop/pictures/videos/etc
• Restore stuff like playlists in Windows Media Player by going to it's folder in %appdata%
• Keep savegames and stuff from Documents / appdata / programdata folders

As long as you have a backup, you can google where any program you used, stores stuff like preferences, etc and restore it right from the backup or atleast set it up the same way it was before.
 

one-called-kane

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Oct 8, 2013
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I personally hate Windows 10. Will use Windows 7 forever. I had this same issue a long time ago when I did a new build.

So, use a sector by sector backup tool to back the OS up. from any comp you have access to.
I used EaseUS Todo Backup. Keep the backup with you anyway. It's always good.

Simple - If you want Win7 - Simply reinstall Windows 7 from step 1, use backup to copy all your data.
Also not a fan of 10. Can you please expand on the above? Specifically how to back up the OS when the MB is dead. Is that something I can accomplish from the BIOS or Ubuntu?

I don't mess with the OS very often, the last time was ~3+ years ago and I find myself having to re-learn /learn the new rules every time I need to get back into it.
 
Also not a fan of 10. Can you please expand on the above? Specifically how to back up the OS when the MB is dead. Is that something I can accomplish from the BIOS or Ubuntu?

I don't mess with the OS very often, the last time was ~3+ years ago and I find myself having to re-learn /learn the new rules every time I need to get back into it.
Once the new motherboard is in place you can boot Ubuntu from a USB and "test" it to backup the files you need. Once that is complete you can reinstall Windows.
 

one-called-kane

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Oct 8, 2013
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So wonder of wonders, Windows actually booted when I started the system up after replacing the motherboard. Of course, I get ASUS errors and the m&k don't work because the drivers are all wrong but it actually booted without going into the system restore / windows error loop cycle that has always happened before. I swear I will never understand this software's logic.

The C:\drive is going to be backing itself up today anyways, but in this situation is it still best to go through with the windows reinstall or is there a way to install the new drivers without going through the hassle of reinstalling everything?
 

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