Re-partition SSD Drive

gravetthj62

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Oct 14, 2017
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Many months ago, I purchased a 240Gb Sandisk SSD, to complement my existed 1TB HD.
I followed the install instructions using the supplied software, moving the C: from my HD to the SSD.
I was hoping to use the SSD purely for Windows 10 OS, & the 1TB HD for all other data.
Everything has worked fine including a faster boot, so assumed the SSD install was successful.
Now I have noticed that Windows 10 has now run out of space. After further checks, the install of the SSD may not have gone as expected.

My set-up according to Acronis Disk Director 11 is as follows:-

SSD Disk 1 (MBR)
Windows (C:) NTFS 63.88GB (Active)
Windows 7 (E:) NTFS 159.70 GB (this is currently my Windows 10 partition)

How my SSD ended in with a C: partition is unknown and is currently unused. What exists on this partition appears to be Uninstall files as I did upgrade from Win 7 to Win 10. I cannot recall If I upgraded to Win 10 before or after install of the SSD.

Disk 2 (MBR)

I have 5 partitions on this drive for various forms of data storage namely (D:, F:, G:, J: & K:)
H: & I: are DVD Drives.

My concern here is Drive J: NTFS is shown as (active, System, Boot) &
Drive K: NTFS (Boot)
These were somehow created by the software supplied with the SSD & are unused.
All my program installs go on Drive F:

Now I am confused & need help in sorting my partitions out.

I've tried to reduce the size of C: as a short term solution, but neither windows or Acronis 11 will do this.

My end game is for the SSD 240GB to have Windows 10 OS only & is Bootable. Ideally partitioned as a C:

The 1TB HD for all other data, partitioned as required D:, E:, F: G: Like to loose J: & K:.

I can supply a screenshot if required of above if required.

Please supply guidance on how to best obtain my end game.

Thanks
 
1. It's virtually impossible for me to make complete sense of what you submitted in order to provide any sensible advice to you. I really need to view a screenshot of Disk Management along the lines I've indicated in my previous post. If you want to pursue this further then undertake a Google search on "creating screenshot for submittal to Tom's Hardware forum" and see if you can follow the instructions you come across.

2. As I previously indicated, as a general proposition, a disk-cloning program is geared to clone the ENTIRE contents of one drive to another as long as the TOTAL cloned contents will "fit" on the available disk-space capacity of the recipient drive of the cloned contents. While it is possible to clone only this or that partition to the destination drive (usually because, as in your case, the source drive's data contents are simply too large to be contained on the destination drive), it can be an awkward process that simply doesn't work.

3. You might want to consider simply fresh-installing the Win 10 OS onto your intended boot drive, i.e., the 240 GB SSD and then use the 1 TB HDD as a secondary drive in the system. It will mean, of course, that you will have to reinstall all, or virtually all, the programs/applications and possibly other data that now reside on that 1 TB drive.
 
1. It's ALWAYS best to submit a screenshot of Disk Management when reporting problems of the type you've posted. When you do be sure to include in the screenshot the upper portion of DM as well, including the info in the various columns from "Volume" to "% Free" and ensure you widen the "Capacity" & "Free Space" columns in particular so as to reflect volume of data.

2. Ordinarily when you clone the contents of the "source" disk, e.g., your 1 TB HDD which I presume was the original boot drive, to the "destination" disk, i.e., your 240 GB SSD the entire contents of the source disk are cloned over to the destination drive. If your source drive was multi-partitoned so that it contained a separate C partition that you desired as the only data from the 1 TB source HDD that you desired to be cloned to your 240 GB destination drive, that would be OK as long as the disk-cloning program provides capability for cloning partitions (not all d-c programs contain that capability), and the volume of data cloned "fits" on the destination drive.

I'm mentioning the above only for general background info. Whether it's material in your situation I cannot tell at this point.
 

gravetthj62

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Oct 14, 2017
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gravetthj62

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Oct 14, 2017
3
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I'd love to insert a screenshot of Disk Management, but being new to this forum, I have been unable to establish how to do so. I have duplicated the detail as below.

Volume Layout Type File System Status Capacity Free Space % Free
D: Simple Basic FAT32 Healthy (Logical Drive) 150.22GB 133.34GB 89%
G: Simple Basic FAT32 Healthy (Logical Drive) 199.96GB 119.45GB 60%
F: Simple Basic NTFS Healthy (Logical Drive) 301.24GB 229.72GB 76%
C: Simple Basic NTFS Healthy (System, Page file. Active, Primary Partition) 63.88GB 53.02GB 83%

J: Simple Basic NTFS Healthy (Active, Primary Partition) 80.00GB 61.67GB 77%
E: Simple Basic NTFS Healthy (Boot, Crash Dump, Logical drive) 159.69GB 2.40GB 2%
K: Simple Basic NTFS Healthy (Logical Drive) 200GB 58.49GB 29%
 
1. It's virtually impossible for me to make complete sense of what you submitted in order to provide any sensible advice to you. I really need to view a screenshot of Disk Management along the lines I've indicated in my previous post. If you want to pursue this further then undertake a Google search on "creating screenshot for submittal to Tom's Hardware forum" and see if you can follow the instructions you come across.

2. As I previously indicated, as a general proposition, a disk-cloning program is geared to clone the ENTIRE contents of one drive to another as long as the TOTAL cloned contents will "fit" on the available disk-space capacity of the recipient drive of the cloned contents. While it is possible to clone only this or that partition to the destination drive (usually because, as in your case, the source drive's data contents are simply too large to be contained on the destination drive), it can be an awkward process that simply doesn't work.

3. You might want to consider simply fresh-installing the Win 10 OS onto your intended boot drive, i.e., the 240 GB SSD and then use the 1 TB HDD as a secondary drive in the system. It will mean, of course, that you will have to reinstall all, or virtually all, the programs/applications and possibly other data that now reside on that 1 TB drive.
 

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