[SOLVED] Really high pump speeds

Nov 12, 2019
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Hi guys, I install Hwmonitor and when I start looking for the fans i just noticed that my pump it's doing 4891 rpm, any ideas about what can be the problem in that? I've a corsair h75 aio

https://ibb.co/NC9Xk7q
 
Last edited:

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
Being worried about the longevity your AIO pump but also buying an AIO in the first place seems rather contradictory. But yes, pumps are designed to run at these speeds. Just because you think its fast, doesn't mean it wasn't intended to operate that way.

1) All AIOs have a warranty. This should have been the VERY first thing you researched along with RMA policy and actual user reviews and ratings. Take the word of people who understand what is involved with a cooler over someone who bought it for the RGB lighting and 'looks cool, man'.

2) Nearly all AIOs are built by the same 2-3 OEMs. This means the Corsair, Cooler Master and NZXT cooler you debated over and over about might actually be the same cooler other than the paint job, fans and box it came in. Asetek and CoolIT are the 2 primary ones and there are some others like DeepCool and IDCooling getting around the Asetek patent by changing how the pump flow works...but they're all similar in design. Arctic released a new series recently that was their own design, which actually did relatively well in my testing.

3) AIOs are built for pennies and have cheaply made components. Pumps are mostly plastic with plastic impellers, radiators are aluminum and flow rates are horrible...which is why you don't see head pressure or flow rates listed. The price of an AIO is often the same price as a single CPU block, radiator or watercooling pump used for custom loops.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
HWmonitor is rarely accurate about anything in my experience. If you want to monitor pump speed, and if the pump is connected to a motherboard header, then check the data in the BIOS for that header. It will be accurate, unlike the readings from HWmonitor most of the time.

Or, try HWinfo. HWinfo, again, in MY experience and in the shared experiences of a lot of members here who have related similar problems on a good many chipsets, is a lot more accurate than most of what is out there. It's kept religiously up to date in terms of chipset support.

Since the maximum pump RPM for that cooler is around 1450rpm, there's no way it could actually be at 4891rpm and not have already burned up, if in fact it could ever even REACH that RPM, which is seriously doubtful.
 
Reactions: DrakosVz
Nov 12, 2019
6
0
10
0
HWmonitor is rarely accurate about anything in my experience. If you want to monitor pump speed, and if the pump is connected to a motherboard header, then check the data in the BIOS for that header. It will be accurate, unlike the readings from HWmonitor most of the time.

Or, try HWinfo. HWinfo, again, in MY experience and in the shared experiences of a lot of members here who have related similar problems on a good many chipsets, is a lot more accurate than most of what is out there. It's kept religiously up to date in terms of chipset support.

Since the maximum pump RPM for that cooler is around 1450rpm, there's no way it could actually be at 4891rpm and not have already burned up, if in fact it could ever even REACH that RPM, which is seriously doubtful.
I searched for info in the bios, but the speeds there are the same as Hwmonitor D:

Update 1: I donwloaded HwInfo, but it's the same as my bios and hwmonitor, i really don't know what can be
 
Last edited:

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
What is the cooler in question? NM...Corsair H75

Are we getting mixed up between fan RPM and pump RPM? I've tested several AIOs that have pump RPMs reporting between 2000-4000+ RPM. Just depends on the models and the pumps used.

It also could be a difference in how the pump is reporting the speed to the header in question. I've also seen this and had to use a fan controller to verify RPM, but this usually only happens with certain fans, not necessarily pumps.
 
Reactions: DrakosVz

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
The max pump speed on that unit should be about 1450-1500rpm from what I can find. There is nothing to suggest that this is a model with four or six poles that would report a double or triple RPM, but if it's some newer design, revised, than what I am seeing, then I guess it's possible. Based on what I see though, that's not the case.

https://forum.corsair.com/FORUMS/showthread.php?t=157872&t=157872


The H60 and H45 seem to have pump speeds around the speed you are reporting, so perhaps you don't actually have the model you think you have?

https://forum.corsair.com/v3/showthread.php?t=166007&t=166007
 
Reactions: DrakosVz
Nov 12, 2019
6
0
10
0
The max pump speed on that unit should be about 1450-1500rpm from what I can find. There is nothing to suggest that this is a model with four or six poles that would report a double or triple RPM, but if it's some newer design, revised, than what I am seeing, then I guess it's possible. Based on what I see though, that's not the case.

https://forum.corsair.com/FORUMS/showthread.php?t=157872&t=157872


The H60 and H45 seem to have pump speeds around the speed you are reporting, so perhaps you don't actually have the model you think you have?

https://forum.corsair.com/v3/showthread.php?t=166007&t=166007

I bought exactly this model:

https://www.amazon.com/CORSAIR-Hydro-Liquid-Cooler-Radiator/dp/B07DGDXW6Z/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=corsair+h75&qid=1573592605&sr=8-1

I tried to find some info about his pump speed in the corsair and the amazon page but i can't find anything
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
It's an AIO, you are likely not going to find a lot of details like flow rate, head pressure, pump RPM and additional details that a normal watercooling pump would display. Most of this will require you to monitor these speeds and cross-check them with others who may have done the same.
 
Reactions: DrakosVz
Nov 12, 2019
6
0
10
0
It's an AIO, you are likely not going to find a lot of details like flow rate, head pressure, pump RPM and additional details that a normal watercooling pump would display. Most of this will require you to monitor these speeds and cross-check them with others who may have done the same.
I understand... but I still a bit worried about the life of my pump, what i can do in this case? just let it in that way and hope the best?
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
Being worried about the longevity your AIO pump but also buying an AIO in the first place seems rather contradictory. But yes, pumps are designed to run at these speeds. Just because you think its fast, doesn't mean it wasn't intended to operate that way.

1) All AIOs have a warranty. This should have been the VERY first thing you researched along with RMA policy and actual user reviews and ratings. Take the word of people who understand what is involved with a cooler over someone who bought it for the RGB lighting and 'looks cool, man'.

2) Nearly all AIOs are built by the same 2-3 OEMs. This means the Corsair, Cooler Master and NZXT cooler you debated over and over about might actually be the same cooler other than the paint job, fans and box it came in. Asetek and CoolIT are the 2 primary ones and there are some others like DeepCool and IDCooling getting around the Asetek patent by changing how the pump flow works...but they're all similar in design. Arctic released a new series recently that was their own design, which actually did relatively well in my testing.

3) AIOs are built for pennies and have cheaply made components. Pumps are mostly plastic with plastic impellers, radiators are aluminum and flow rates are horrible...which is why you don't see head pressure or flow rates listed. The price of an AIO is often the same price as a single CPU block, radiator or watercooling pump used for custom loops.
 
Nov 12, 2019
6
0
10
0
Being worried about the longevity your AIO pump but also buying an AIO in the first place seems rather contradictory. But yes, pumps are designed to run at these speeds. Just because you think its fast, doesn't mean it wasn't intended to operate that way.

1) All AIOs have a warranty. This should have been the VERY first thing you researched along with RMA policy and actual user reviews and ratings. Take the word of people who understand what is involved with a cooler over someone who bought it for the RGB lighting and 'looks cool, man'.

2) Nearly all AIOs are built by the same 2-3 OEMs. This means the Corsair, Cooler Master and NZXT cooler you debated over and over about might actually be the same cooler other than the paint job, fans and box it came in. Asetek and CoolIT are the 2 primary ones and there are some others like DeepCool and IDCooling getting around the Asetek patent by changing how the pump flow works...but they're all similar in design. Arctic released a new series recently that was their own design, which actually did relatively well in my testing.

3) AIOs are built for pennies and have cheaply made components. Pumps are mostly plastic with plastic impellers, radiators are aluminum and flow rates are horrible...which is why you don't see head pressure or flow rates listed. The price of an AIO is often the same price as a single CPU block, radiator or watercooling pump used for custom loops.
Thanks I'll have all what you say in mind for the next time, i've a i7-9700k and was thinking in some good air cooler for that cpu, you've one in mind to buy and change my aio?
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
I myself have a 9700k and I have it on full watercooling, but that's just because I've watercooled for nearly 18 years.

I'm currently reviewing the Deep Cool Assassin III and it is doing surprisingly well.

Also recommend the be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 and Noctua NH-D14/15.

Arctic Liquid Freezer II 280 was a surprisingly good AIO.

Much of this depends on whether you really want liquid cooling or a good air cooler?
 
Reactions: DrakosVz
Nov 12, 2019
6
0
10
0
I myself have a 9700k and I have it on full watercooling, but that's just because I've watercooled for nearly 18 years.

I'm currently reviewing the Deep Cool Assassin III and it is doing surprisingly well.

Also recommend the be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 and Noctua NH-D14/15.

Arctic Liquid Freezer II 280 was a surprisingly good AIO.

Much of this depends on whether you really want liquid cooling or a good air cooler?
I really used air cooler all my life, this corsair h75aio it's my first water cooler what i tried, and i'm very happy with the results, but as the product info says the liquid inside the water cooler have a life of 3 o 5 years untill i've to change, and i don't like too much that, i like more staying all the time with a good air cooler

btw: i was thinking in a noctua NH-D14, what tems you get with that one :D?
 

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