[SOLVED] Really Old System I need help!

trackerjackerly

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Hey guys! I have a really old network system and I am a super DIY guy and can really do anything based off directions and videos but for my network cabling it is far older than anything seen in videos. I am looking to modernize it completely so that I can have a full network tower as well as ability to run into multiple servers etc. Can you guys maybe help me out and point me in the direction of how I should go about this? Here are some photos, please try and break down steps as simple as possible with maybe image steps also. Also maybe help me pick parts tools etc.

Here is what I am working with:
https://ibb.co/HBC8F0S
https://ibb.co/ZHvFmrH
 

AllanGH

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Time-wise, you are asking for a significant investment of time from others, when you have contributed very little in the way of framing the requirements in a way that allows anyone to give you a meaningful answer.

Essentially, you are asking for a free contractor evaluation; which actually should be done only after a walk-through....and you are asking others to take the issue more seriously that you seem to.

No attacks. Just the facts.

[EDIT]

Did a reply post just disappear?
 

digitalgriffin

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There's really not enough information here to be helpful. I find the "couple of servers" comment baffling, because if you are setting up servers (Especially a couple of them), you should know networking basics enough to figure out what you need.

Don't take this as us being Salty. Your question is just way too open ended with too many variables.

Running Plenum Cat 6a is brain dead with a punch down terminal or Crimp tool. If you can run ROMEX you can run Cat 6a. Hooking it up to the outside world is the ISP's responsibility.

I'm going to take a wild stab here and guess that you are a contractor working on someone else's house, or a flipper trying to install value.
 
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hang-the-9

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Hey guys! I have a really old network system and I am a super DIY guy and can really do anything based off directions and videos but for my network cabling it is far older than anything seen in videos. I am looking to modernize it completely so that I can have a full network tower as well as ability to run into multiple servers etc. Can you guys maybe help me out and point me in the direction of how I should go about this? Here are some photos, please try and break down steps as simple as possible with maybe image steps also. Also maybe help me pick parts tools etc.

Here is what I am working with:
https://ibb.co/HBC8F0S
https://ibb.co/ZHvFmrH
None of that looks network related, and nothing you can re-use, it's a giant mess with no labels.

You need a router, switch on that router, wiring going up to the rooms terminating at network jacks from a central area connected to a punch-down block, then the switch connected to that block to get network connection to the ports. Just do a web search for how to wire a house with ethernet.
 

USAFRet

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Oh, and as you're working on this, leave the word "server" out of the mix. Just confuses things.

A "server" uses the same cable and RJ-45 jack as my printer or Ooma VOIP device.
Unless of course, you're wiring up for the 100 person team designing the next space station. In which case you just ask your infrastructure guy.
 

trackerjackerly

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I just need to know how to make it so I can have multiple CAT6 cables coming out. I am literally 18 years old and I am trying to expand on something that was made when ethernet first came out and hasn't been touched. I need to know if that box: https://ibb.co/h7MqCzz is where I can punch down the wiring for a CAT6 or am I looking at the completely wrong thing. That is in my basement btw, as I am assuming that is where it is coming in.
 

AllanGH

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That punch-down block is for POTS (telephone) wiring, not for networking.

To do it right, you need a back board, a couple of IC-66 punch-down blocks for cross connects, both wood screws and concrete screws / anchors, Tapcon bits (probably 3/16"), some multiple of 1000 feet of CAT-5e or CAT-6 cable, Keystone jacks, testing equipment, a drill motor, auger bits, along with a 4 foot and a 6 foot long installer bit, a couple 25' long fish tapes, drywall or plaster saws, non-metalllic, cut-in wall boxes, a punch-down tool with both cut and non-cut bit ends, modem or modem / gateway, router, switch, WiFi access point.......and, since you definitely do not own the house, permission from your parents, and / or the property owner to make the kind of modifications that you will need to make to install whole-house ethernet.

Need I go on?

You are, as has been said before, firmly in the territory of "If you have to ask, you really can't do the job correctly.

Ask your parents to hire a contractor.
 
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trackerjackerly

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See I understand how to do all that, what I am confused about is the initial starting point. I am able to do everything else I just have no idea where to get the initial connection from as either mine looks different or I am looking in the wrong place for the cable that brings the network in from outside. Like is this it or is this just an extension? https://ibb.co/7rq6s1p
 

USAFRet

Titan
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See I understand how to do all that, what I am confused about is the initial starting point. I am able to do everything else I just have no idea where to get the initial connection from as either mine looks different or I am looking in the wrong place for the cable that brings the network in from outside. Like is this it or is this just an extension? https://ibb.co/7rq6s1p
That hackjob wire has nothing to do with networking.
At best, that is simply telephone cable. And done badly.
 

USAFRet

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Some questions you need to know the answer to, before you think about starting.
Don't answer these here...you need to know them.

Who is your ISP?
Cable, DSL, fiber, other?
What speed do you pay for?
Where does the signal come into the house?
Type of house construction...stick wood, brick, other?
Do you own or rent?
How many floors?
Basement, crawlspace or slab?
Attic?
How many rooms do you want wired?
How many systems?
How many systems in each room?

What tools do you own?
What tools do you know how to use?
What is the homeowners (s/he who pays the mortgage) level of acceptance for wall surface blemishes?

What is your overall budget for this?


If you were to hire a contractor, that is some of what they would start with.
 
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trackerjackerly

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Some questions you need to know the answer to, before you think about starting.
Don't answer these here...you need to know them.

Who is your ISP?
Cable, DSL, fiber, other?
What speed do you pay for?
Where does the signal come into the house?
Type of house construction...stick wood, brick, other?
Do you own or rent?
How many floors?
Basement, crawlspace or slab?
Attic?
How many rooms do you want wired?
How many systems?
How many systems in each room?

What tools do you own?
What tools do you know how to use?
What is the homeowners (s/he who pays the mortgage) level of acceptance for wall surface blemishes?

What is your overall budget for this?


If you were to hire a contractor, that is some of what they would start with.
Do you recommend any sites for this sort of contract work? I am looking at things like taskrabbit and don't see stuff like this.
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Do you recommend any sites for this sort of contract work? I am looking at things like taskrabbit and don't see stuff like this.
No, taskrabbit is not where you want to go for this.
You want a bonded contractor. Not a regular handyman sort of dude that can mount a TV on the wall.

Personal recommendations. "I know a guy who knows a guy"
Who is the actual homeowner here? You or your parent?
 

digitalgriffin

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I just need to know how to make it so I can have multiple CAT6 cables coming out. I am literally 18 years old and I am trying to expand on something that was made when ethernet first came out and hasn't been touched. I need to know if that box: https://ibb.co/h7MqCzz is where I can punch down the wiring for a CAT6 or am I looking at the completely wrong thing. That is in my basement btw, as I am assuming that is where it is coming in.
There are several ways of doing it. First thing you need to do is contact who you want to be your ISP and get them to drop a line to the basement. They should offer you a modem to go with it. (They will need to test it any way with the modem to make sure your connection works.)

Now like all ISP installers, they will do a crap job. But it's not their job to wire up your house and make it look pretty. The good news is, they will provide you a usable starting point. 99% of modems are going to have an ethernet port.

Now grab a good piece of 1/2" or 5/8" plywood. A 3'x3' sheet should be large enough for a small network install (Modem/Firewall/Switch OR Router/Punchdown block) You'll need some concrete lag screws and masonry bits. An Impact drill will make things go faster for the masonry bits. But you can use a standard drill. It will just take longer. If the basement is under ground, be sure to seal around the concrete lag screw to avoid leakage. Most recommend that you don't put the lag screw into cinderblock. If you have cinderblock (most likely given the age) you'll likely want to put the lag screws in the motar between the blocks. Cinderblocks are made of larger aggregate and therefore don't drill as well.

All quality Ethernet cabling (use Cat 6a->Cat 8 to future proof) has color coded wiring that conforms to standards. As long as you match up the colors on each cable you should be fine. Here is the order they go in:

So how do you break out 1 wire from the ISP into MANY? Well there are two ways:

  1. Go from ISP Modem -> either A) Firewall/Switch OR B) Router
  2. Most routers only contain 4, 5 usable ports. So you can run a switch after the router to get more ports if you need them.
  3. Now if you use a punch down block, you'll need to buy a punch down tool and appropriate block. The other option is to just put a RJ45 on the end of each line directly using a crimp tool. You'll need a crimp tool any way even if you use a punch block.
https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=7055&gclid=EAIaIQobChMItO_CteHr4QIVAeDICh2wVwQPEAQYBCABEgL86PD_BwE

4. Now the pain in the duckass part: You'll need to buy fish tape. And if you are crossing floors you'll need at least 25'. You need to run the cables between floors. I recommend interior walls so you don't fight insulation. BE SURE TO USE PLENUM RATED CABLE (https://www.cmple.com/learn/understanding-cable-jacket-ratings-cl-cm-cmr-and-cmp) IF YOU DO NOT YOUR HOUSE INSURANCE MAY BE VOID. Some people who run multiple floors like to install 2" PVC Pipe in one central location up two floors and then exit it in the attic. They then drop it on the second floor from the attic. This makes it easier than running a whole bunch of separate runs up multiple floors. Doing it once is enough to make most quit.

Once you do all this you are 99% of the way there. The only thing that is left is appropriate equipment selection based on the use needs. Most quality consumer grade equipment comes with mounting holes on the back. So you just need to put a 1/2" screw into the plywood and hang it. Be sure to connect it all to appropriately wired and grounded surge suppressors.

Having a house properly wired for Ethernet can add a couple thousand to your bottom line when it comes time to sell. It's considered a hot item.

There is always a risk you may damage yourself or hit electrical lines/pipes. There's also a small possibility you may hit asbestos (I'm not joking. It was used for tiles and insulation up till the 70's) Anything you do here, you do so at your own risk. YOU ASSUME ALL RISK AND LIABILITY FOR ANY PROPERTY DAMAGE AND BODILY HARM.
 
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digitalgriffin

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Other tips:
1. When you run cable ALWAYS give yourself an addition 2', 3' cable length at each end. Connectors break and having extra there gives you room to work and repair in the future. Electricians do the same thing with electrical outlets.

2. Post/Remodel electrical boxes are the easiest thing to work with. In my experience, they have ethernet faceplates available that are either punchdown or screw terminal. I prefer the punchdown kind. Just be sure the punchdowns are color coded before you purchase them.

3. Some people like to cheat and run cabling through return vents. I'm not keen on this approach as I think it might violate NEC code. Even though plenum cable doesn't release toxic gases, or burn that well, putting any material in a duct that may burn can still release irritating smoke.
 

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