[SOLVED] Reasons why my PC makes noise?

Sep 25, 2021
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So, my PC makes a considerable amount of noise and I can think of a few reasons why, but since I’m still a rookie to all the PC building stuff, I would like to ask for help from more experienced people. 1. The PC case I have right now is the Aerocool Cylon RGB Mid Tower, and I’ve heard the airflow of this case isn‘t optimal. 2. The amount of fans I have right now are 2, 1 intake, 1 exhaust. It‘s a Gaming PC, so maybe it needs more fans. The PC has enough place for 3 fans, so maybe I should add a third fan ? Not sure whether the PC will quiet down if I do that, but I can give it a try. 3. Maybe the PC isn’t that loud and it‘s just me. So I dont wear any headphones whenever I use my PC and the PC is like right next to me. So maybe that’s the reason why I think it‘s loud, but it actually isn’t. So if anyone could help me out, I would appreciate it. Also one final reason could be dust, I built my PC last year somewhere around July, so I don‘t assume it is dust.

those were the reasons i could think of, so if there are any other reasons why, i would like to hear it

thanks in advance

also one final note, sometimes i also think it‘s because of the system, so i only have 2 games on the PC, Minecraft and Genshin Impact. Besides this, not really anything else
 

geofelt

Titan
What is the nature of the noise?
The usual culprit is a fan running at high rpm.
It could be the case fans, the cpu cooler fan or the graphics card cooling fan.
All can be speed controlled to adjust the cooling vs. noise equation.

As to your thought about an added fan, that might help.
Yes, an extra fan will make some noise.
But, adding to the case airflow might reduce the overall cooling needs and allow all the fans to run at lower speeds.
900rpm will not be silent, but will not be noticed.
If your fans are over 1500 rpm, they will sound noisy.

Having the case on your desktop near your ear will aggravate your problem.
See if it can't be placed to the side or under your desk.
 

Paperdoc

Polypheme
Ambassador
I see this is a follow-up to another thread.

There are several possible reasons for fan noise. One you have not mentioned but is common: the fan type does not match the mobo fan header, and you need to adjust an option in BIOS Setup. To give you precise guidance on this, we need you to post back here:

  1. Maker and exact model of your mobo.
  2. Maker and exact model of your case fans.
  3. Maker and model of your CPU cooler system.
If you already know how to access and move around in BIOS Setup, tell as. If not, tell us also so we can advise on that.
 
Sep 25, 2021
15
0
10
0
I see this is a follow-up to another thread.

There are several possible reasons for fan noise. One you have not mentioned but is common: the fan type does not match the mobo fan header, and you need to adjust an option in BIOS Setup. To give you precise guidance on this, we need you to post back here:

  1. Maker and exact model of your mobo.
  2. Maker and exact model of your case fans.
  3. Maker and model of your CPU cooler system.
If you already know how to access and move around in BIOS Setup, tell as. If not, tell us also so we can advise on that.
Hi, first I wanted to thank you for helping me.

So, I know how to enter the BIOS and move around a bit, since I‘ve already been dealing with this fan noise problem for quite a time now and saw a video in which you could change your fan speed in BIOS. I don’t feel very comfortable with changing the speed of my fans this way, since maybe I will set them to low and the components will overheat. But yeah, I would like some guidance,

-I currently use 2 fans, the one on the front panel is an ‘Arctic F12’, designed by ARCTIC, the one on the back panel is the one that came together with the case, so it’s just a standard 120mm fan made by AeroCool.

-My motherboard is the ‘B450M PRO-M2 MAX’ designed by MSI.

-And finally my CPU cooler. I bought the AMD Ryzen 5 3600 CPU, together with it, came the ‘AMD Wraith Stealth’ cooler that I’m using right now.

If you need anymore information, you can tell me. Thanks for the help
 

Paperdoc

Polypheme
Ambassador
Thanks for that info. I can outline how to configure fan header setting in BIOS Setup. Note that each header is configured separately. I see also that your mobo has only one header of each type: one for the CPU cooler, and one for case ventilation fans.

There is a potential problem here that MAY relate to your issue. Fan motors come in two types. The older design are called "Voltage Controlled Fans" or "3-pin fans". They have three wires in the cable, and the female connector on the end has three holes. It has two ridges running down one side of the connector, and these fit around a plastic "tongue" that sticks up beside the male header pins on the mobo, so you can only plug them in one way. Control of the fan speed is accomplished by varying the VOLTAGE of the power supplied on Pin #2.

The newer design are called "PWM Fans" or "4-pin Fans". These have FOUR wires in the cable and 4 holes in the connector. It looks a LOT like the 3-pin connector, just a bit wider, and the corresponding male mobo header has 4 pins. The method or "MODE" of speed control for these is different. Power on Pin #2 is always the full 12 VDC, and the fourth pin supplies the new PWM control signal. Inside the fan, a small chip uses that signal to modify the flow of current from Pin #2 through the windings to achieve speed control.

4-pin fans were designed with some backward-compatible features so you CAN plug either fan type into either header type. But If you plug a 3-pin fan into a header using the new 4-pin PWM Mode for control, that fan can only run full speed all the time. On the other mis-match, you CAN control the speed of a 4-pin fan using the older 3-pin Voltage Control Mode, although that is not quite ideal. As a result, although you CAN connect fans of both types together to one header, it is preferable NOT to mix this way if you can avoid it.

Almost all mobos now have fan headers ONLY with 4 pins. But the options in BIOS Setup for each header allow you to specify which type or MODE of control system that header uses for its fans.

Now, MODE is the METHOD by which the mobo header exercises control of speed. But DECIDING what speed should be is another choice, the PROFILE. Your mobo has a limited set of options here illustrated in the manual on p. 14. On that screen the graph is a "fan curve" of what speed to run for a range of temperatures. It comes pre-set, but you can change any of the four points on the graph by dragging it with your mouse pointer. For now I suggest you do not make such changes, but you can later after considering other items.

FIRST we'll look at the MODE item for each of your two headers. For the CPU_FAN header I am sure it is a 4-pin fan on that cooler, so at upper left make sure it is set to PWM Mode. Now go to the SYS_FAN header. Often the MSI mobos come with this one pre-configured to DC Mode, but you can check that. What you do want for this is: if both your case fans are 3-pin, set it to DC Mode. If both are 4-pin, set it to PWM Mode. I am assuming here that both of your case fans are connected to the only SYS_FAN header you have by a Splitter.

BUT what if you have something else? For example, it is possible that only ONE of those fans is plugged into the SYS_FAN header, and the other is connected instead directly to a power output from the PSU. In that case there is NO ability to run the directly-connected fan at less than max speed, so we'll need to find a solution for that.

Another possibility is that both fans are connected via a Splitter to that SYS_FAN header, BUT they are different types - one 3-pin and one 4-pin. In that case IF the header is set to use PWM Mode, then the 3-pin fan will always run full speed and make more noise. You can change that. If you set the SYS_FAN header to use DC Mode, BOTH fans will be under speed control and run quieter, even though this is not quite ideal for the 4-pin fan.

So make any changes you deem necessary in BIOS Setp. When done, use the F10 key to pop up a small screen that asks you to confirm that you want to SAVE your settings and REBOOT. Do that. See if that improves your situation.

If that still does not solve the issue, post back here the details. How is the SYS_FAN header configured? How are the two case fans connected to what? Are those two fans the SAME type or different? If the same, which: 3-pin or 4-pin? Can you tell which of your THREE fans is making the most noise?
 
Sep 25, 2021
15
0
10
0
Thanks for that info. I can outline how to configure fan header setting in BIOS Setup. Note that each header is configured separately. I see also that your mobo has only one header of each type: one for the CPU cooler, and one for case ventilation fans.

There is a potential problem here that MAY relate to your issue. Fan motors come in two types. The older design are called "Voltage Controlled Fans" or "3-pin fans". They have three wires in the cable, and the female connector on the end has three holes. It has two ridges running down one side of the connector, and these fit around a plastic "tongue" that sticks up beside the male header pins on the mobo, so you can only plug them in one way. Control of the fan speed is accomplished by varying the VOLTAGE of the power supplied on Pin #2.

The newer design are called "PWM Fans" or "4-pin Fans". These have FOUR wires in the cable and 4 holes in the connector. It looks a LOT like the 3-pin connector, just a bit wider, and the corresponding male mobo header has 4 pins. The method or "MODE" of speed control for these is different. Power on Pin #2 is always the full 12 VDC, and the fourth pin supplies the new PWM control signal. Inside the fan, a small chip uses that signal to modify the flow of current from Pin #2 through the windings to achieve speed control.

4-pin fans were designed with some backward-compatible features so you CAN plug either fan type into either header type. But If you plug a 3-pin fan into a header using the new 4-pin PWM Mode for control, that fan can only run full speed all the time. On the other mis-match, you CAN control the speed of a 4-pin fan using the older 3-pin Voltage Control Mode, although that is not quite ideal. As a result, although you CAN connect fans of both types together to one header, it is preferable NOT to mix this way if you can avoid it.

Almost all mobos now have fan headers ONLY with 4 pins. But the options in BIOS Setup for each header allow you to specify which type or MODE of control system that header uses for its fans.

Now, MODE is the METHOD by which the mobo header exercises control of speed. But DECIDING what speed should be is another choice, the PROFILE. Your mobo has a limited set of options here illustrated in the manual on p. 14. On that screen the graph is a "fan curve" of what speed to run for a range of temperatures. It comes pre-set, but you can change any of the four points on the graph by dragging it with your mouse pointer. For now I suggest you do not make such changes, but you can later after considering other items.

FIRST we'll look at the MODE item for each of your two headers. For the CPU_FAN header I am sure it is a 4-pin fan on that cooler, so at upper left make sure it is set to PWM Mode. Now go to the SYS_FAN header. Often the MSI mobos come with this one pre-configured to DC Mode, but you can check that. What you do want for this is: if both your case fans are 3-pin, set it to DC Mode. If both are 4-pin, set it to PWM Mode. I am assuming here that both of your case fans are connected to the only SYS_FAN header you have by a Splitter.

BUT what if you have something else? For example, it is possible that only ONE of those fans is plugged into the SYS_FAN header, and the other is connected instead directly to a power output from the PSU. In that case there is NO ability to run the directly-connected fan at less than max speed, so we'll need to find a solution for that.

Another possibility is that both fans are connected via a Splitter to that SYS_FAN header, BUT they are different types - one 3-pin and one 4-pin. In that case IF the header is set to use PWM Mode, then the 3-pin fan will always run full speed and make more noise. You can change that. If you set the SYS_FAN header to use DC Mode, BOTH fans will be under speed control and run quieter, even though this is not quite ideal for the 4-pin fan.

So make any changes you deem necessary in BIOS Setp. When done, use the F10 key to pop up a small screen that asks you to confirm that you want to SAVE your settings and REBOOT. Do that. See if that improves your situation.

If that still does not solve the issue, post back here the details. How is the SYS_FAN header configured? How are the two case fans connected to what? Are those two fans the SAME type or different? If the same, which: 3-pin or 4-pin? Can you tell which of your THREE fans is making the most noise?
Hi!

Thank you for your time and help in this all, I will try to follow your advice and answer your questions. I’m a bit busy with school right now, so I will let you know how it went next week.

Thanks again!
 

geofelt

Titan
What is the nature of the noise?
The usual culprit is a fan running at high rpm.
It could be the case fans, the cpu cooler fan or the graphics card cooling fan.
All can be speed controlled to adjust the cooling vs. noise equation.

As to your thought about an added fan, that might help.
Yes, an extra fan will make some noise.
But, adding to the case airflow might reduce the overall cooling needs and allow all the fans to run at lower speeds.
900rpm will not be silent, but will not be noticed.
If your fans are over 1500 rpm, they will sound noisy.

Having the case on your desktop near your ear will aggravate your problem.
See if it can't be placed to the side or under your desk.
 

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