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Question Recently upgraded PC shutting Down during gaming

lebleu514

Commendable
Dec 29, 2017
10
0
1,510
0
PC specs:
Ryzen 7 3700x
Gtx 1080
16GB DDR4 3000mhz
ASUS 570-P
EVGA 600w Bronze +
2 Nvme SSDs
1 Crucial 512GB ssd
2tb HDD segate

Thank you for taking the time to help me I recently upgraded my i5-7600k to a Ryzen 3700x.

Here’s what I’ve tested, at first I thought this was a thermal issue but the cpu never goes above 85c

The power supply was working perfectly fine two days ago in my PC just before I did the upgrade, I can use my pc do video streaming but when I start playing a game 10-15 mins into my pc shuts down.

Any idea? Thank you
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Did you do a clean install of Windows after you did the upgrade, or are you running the same Windows installation from your pre-upgrade system?

Also, your PSU is not very good quality or performance. I'm assuming you have the BQ, BR or B1 model, none of which are very good especially if they have a few miles on them. That is the most probable issue.

What was your hardware configuration BEFORE the upgrade? CPU, motherboard, graphics card, etc.?

Are you overclocking ANYTHING, including the CPU, memory or graphics card? By overclocking I do not mean the default boost profile, but I DO mean using Precision boost overdrive. I don't mean XMP for memory, but I do mean manually overclocking the graphics card.
 

lebleu514

Commendable
Dec 29, 2017
10
0
1,510
0
Did you do a clean install of Windows after you did the upgrade, or are you running the same Windows installation from your pre-upgrade system?

Also, your PSU is not very good quality or performance. I'm assuming you have the BQ, BR or B1 model, none of which are very good especially if they have a few miles on them. That is the most probable issue.

What was your hardware configuration BEFORE the upgrade? CPU, motherboard, graphics card, etc.?

Are you overclocking ANYTHING, including the CPU, memory or graphics card? By overclocking I do not mean the default boost profile, but I DO mean using Precision boost overdrive. I don't mean XMP for memory, but I do mean manually overclocking the graphics card.
I had a GPU overclocking on EVGA Precision I just removed it I will now test again to see if it was the problem
here is the actual PSU:
https://www.amazon.ca/-/fr/gp/product/B00EON40CS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
I reinstalled windows through the recovery options and installed all Motherboard, Chipset, graphics drivers
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Not a very good power supply. I can't SAY that it IS the problem, but I CAN say that I've seen THAT specific power supply model BE the problem on many, MANY systems. Especially high end systems which that power supply was never intended to be used with.

It is better used with internet browsing machines or low end graphics cards that only require a single six pin connection or slot power, if at all. How long has that B1 PSU been in service?

Installing Windows through "recovery options" is not a clean install. A clean install SHOULD always be done anytime you change platforms to a different chipset. There are a few situations where it might work ok not doing a full clean install, but they are very few. There are simply too many differences in storage controllers, chipset drivers and other motherboard specific onboard hardware components, that are deeply embedded in the entries in the registry, for there to not be problems in most cases. Not to mention other buried areas of Windows.

I would highly recommend that you upgrade to a more suitable power supply that more closely matches the rest of your system in terms of performance and quality:



And that you do a clean install of Windows as well.



If however you wish to attempt some solutions that MIGHT be helpful with fixing the issue before you do those things, the following would be a good place to start.

If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



The last thing we want to look at,

for now anyhow, is the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.

 

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