[SOLVED] Recommended Power Supply for Vega 56 (based upon current hardware)

Feb 1, 2019
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Hi all,

CPU: Intel i7 4790k (I only use it for gaming) 4.0 GHZ overclocked to 4.4 ghz (was done automatically via bios, and it seems fine).
RAM: Kingston 16GB (4x4) 1333mhz
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z97P-D3 ATX LGA1150
Power Supply: Strike 500 watts
SSD: Crucial MX200 250GB
HDD: Western Digital Black 1TB (2010)
GPU: Gigabyte Nvidia GTX 1060 6GB

So I am wanting to upgrade to a Vega 56, but looking around at some recommended Power Supplies which is like 650w, but considering the current hardware I have will 650 watts actually be enough?

I am more a safe than sorry type of person when it comes to these upgrades, I was going to get a new power supply which is inevitable but just finding the right wattage to support the hardware all around as well as allowing the GPU to use its necessary power.

I am not into overclocking, but might experiment just so I have the choice there.

I am open to some recommendations based on my current hardware. If I need to clarify anything don't hesitate to ask!
 

WildCard999

Titan
Herald
Good quality unit, excellent price after MIR and plenty of power for the system & Vega 56.

PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: SeaSonic - EVO Edition 620 W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($44.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $44.98
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-06-20 14:57 EDT-0400


Side note, be careful with auto overclocking software, even in the BIOS as it usually gives the CPU too much voltage which could reduce the lifespan of the CPU.
 
Feb 1, 2019
45
2
35
0
Good quality unit, excellent price after MIR and plenty of power for the system & Vega 56.

PCPartPicker Part List

Power Supply: SeaSonic - EVO Edition 620 W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($44.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $44.98
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-06-20 14:57 EDT-0400


Side note, be careful with auto overclocking software, even in the BIOS as it usually gives the CPU too much voltage which could reduce the lifespan of the CPU.
I am from the UK, however I will look at an amazon equivalent? What about something like this?

Corsair VS650 650 W Active PFC 80 PLUS Certified Power Supply Unit - Black £44.49 @ Amazon

I was tempted just to get a semi modular to make life easier, but it costs extra

Corsair TX-M Series 650 Watt 80 Plus Gold Certified PSU (UK) Hybrid Modular Power Supply Unit - Black £72.48 @ Amazon

I've heard bad things about newegg so im abit uneasy about Newegg.
 
Feb 1, 2019
45
2
35
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The VS PSU's are low quality junk, pass on those. The TX-M is the unit I'd get. Don't cheap out on the PSU as it could ruin that Vega 56 or your other parts.
Ah alright, i dont exactly understand the terms used for power supplies. I pick up on things like 80+ certified or something, or like gold/silver/bronze, idk what any of this means.

I want to get the power supply first before I get a vega 56 or anything.
 
I was tempted just to get a semi modular to make life easier, but it costs extra

Corsair TX-M Series 650 Watt 80 Plus Gold Certified PSU (UK) Hybrid Modular Power Supply Unit - Black £72.48 @ Amazon
That's a pretty good PSU. Get that model, assuming you have the budget. PSU is the MOST important component of any gaming PC, so never ever skimp on the power supply.

Power supplies are an imperative part of any system that should not be taken lightly. Throwing in a budget PSU could result in poor power efficiency or even a wrecked system. Don't SKIMP on the PSU,, since this is the MOST important PC component. I can't stress this enough.

The GOLD/Silver/bronze/Platinum is all about the efficiency. PSU efficiency is a different matter though, as how well the PSU converts the AC power it receives from the outlet, to DC.

Any electricity which is not converted from AC to DC, is given off as heat. A PLATINUM certified PSU might help you save a little on your electricity bill, over a year, though this depends on many other factors as well. Because any high quality Tier 1 platinum certified PSU is rated for at least 90% efficiency at 20% load, 92% at 50% load, and 89% at 100% load (just a rough estimate).
 
Feb 1, 2019
45
2
35
0
That's a pretty good PSU. Get that model, assuming you have the budget. PSU is the MOST important component of any gaming PC, so never ever skimp on the power supply.

Power supplies are an imperative part of any system that should not be taken lightly. Throwing in a budget PSU could result in poor power efficiency or even a wrecked system. Don't SKIMP on the PSU,, since this is the MOST important PC component. I can't stress this enough.

The GOLD/Silver/bronze/Platinum is all about the efficiency. PSU efficiency is a different matter though, as how well the PSU converts the AC power it receives from the outlet, to DC.

Any electricity which is not converted from AC to DC, is given off as heat. A PLATINUM certified PSU might help you save a little on your electricity bill, over a year, though this depends on many other factors as well. Because any high quality Tier 1 platinum certified PSU is rated for at least 90% efficiency at 20% load, 92% at 50% load, and 89% at 100% load (just a rough estimate).
Thanks for the information!

I am aware also about you can get modular/semi-modular ones to help manage cables better by plugging in the ones you want and stuff!
 
Reactions: Metal Messiah.

WildCard999

Titan
Herald
The GOLD/Silver/bronze/Platinum is all about the efficiency. PSU efficiency is a different matter though, as how well the PSU converts the AC power it receives from the outlet, to DC.
^This, the efficiency ratings though don't determine quality. While it's rare there have been some bronze rated units that are actually better then some gold rated ones. Also quality isn't just with one company, for example EVGA makes some great PSU's such as the G2/G3/P2/T2 series but then has ones such as the W1,B1,B3 that I wouldn't trust in a gaming system.
 
Reactions: Metal Messiah.

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