Question Recover Data from (Logical?) HDD Failure

Dec 6, 2019
3
0
10
0
A while ago my Seagate Barracuda drive had failed on me, I had ignored the warning signs where my drive had stopped being recognized on startup occasionally, until it fully wouldn't boot.

I recently purchased a USB SATA connector to try to troubleshoot and hopefully recover data from the drive. Upon mounting, the drive bogged down the whole operating system, slowing it down to a crawl, so I disabled automounting through command prompt and restart the drive. It now shows up under disk management with healthy partitions, however I've no idea as where to go from here.

Can anyone offer me any help as to recovery?
 
Dec 6, 2019
3
0
10
0
Yeah I know, I had never experienced any hardware issues in my life until that moment and I shrugged it off stupidly. Live and learn I suppose. I'm looking into RAID after that incident since I can't bear data loss like that again.

Does the system recognize it at all?
Yes, the system does recognize the drive and attempts to mount it when it is powered on, but it bogs up the system as I said, and I cannot read any data off it.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
117,224
2,630
148,290
19,101
Yeah I know, I had never experienced any hardware issues in my life until that moment and I shrugged it off stupidly. Live and learn I suppose. I'm looking into RAID after that incident since I can't bear data loss like that again.

Yes, the system does recognize the drive and attempts to mount it when it is powered on, but it bogs up the system as I said, and I cannot read any data off it.
RAID, of any type, is NOT a backup or solution to protect your data.
There are much better methods.

 
Dec 6, 2019
3
0
10
0
RAID, of any type, is NOT a backup or solution to protect your data.
There are much better methods.

I'll take a look, thanks. Guess I've got misconceptions about it.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
117,224
2,630
148,290
19,101
A RAID 1 mirror is probably what you're thinking of.

That only benefits overall Uptime, not safeguarding data.
For instance, allows a system to keep running in the event of a physical drive fail. Does NOT ward off any of the other forms of data loss.
 
Jan 10, 2020
10
0
10
0
Whether the drive becomes RAW, unresponsive or corrupt due to any of the reason, the end result is the same which is “loss of data”.

Logical damage or logical errors are like corruption, formatting, lost partitions, accidentally deletion or unresponsiveness of drive whereas physical damages are like loss of data due to breakage, fire, water etc.

If you lost your data due to logical damage then there are chances that your data can be recover with the help of a DIY data recovery software at your home convenience. All you need is to download a reliable data recovery software to another storage drive & run a scan on effected drive & you may get back all your data. You can give a try to RecoverIt, Stellar data recovery professional or Recuva.
 

rforce

Distinguished
Nov 26, 2007
71
1
18,665
6
Can you provide the full details about the model of the drive or even a picture of the top cover?

"You can give a try to RecoverIt, Stellar data recovery professional or Recuva."
Don't even both wasting your time downloading the programs. If you are looking for programs that are actually used by real data recovery professionals, you'd want to be looking at R-Studio, UFS Explorer, ReclaiMe and GetDataBack. You should never, ever, ever, ever run a file system recovery program against a failing hard drive. Your first step should always get a full sector-by-sector clone and then run the file system recovery programs against the stable healthy clone drive.
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS