[SOLVED] Regulators for No Break UPS.

Basht

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Jan 10, 2020
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Hello... plz help.
First of all, sorry for the broken english, I haven't written much in english recently and I don't know most of the tech terms but I'll make a great effort to make it readable.
I have a very specific issue.
At the place i work with, one of those thingies called Uninterruptible Power Supply burned because of voltage and current variations. The supplier of the UPS and the equipment it is connected to wants us to fix it.
Now I know that the problem isn't the UPS and adding a regulator to it isn't going to fix the root of the problem but, since we're evaluating all possible options, I was tasked with choosing a regulator that could protect the UPS (Which might sound dumb maybe) so that it looks like: 240V contact -> BIG regulator -> UPS -> Expensive Equipment.

I'm not an expert on this so I've been doubting myself constantly but from what I understand... If the expensive Equipment has a power rating of lets say 1700VA, then the UPS must have an even bigger output capacity than that right? Now the UPS is a Fruk01 model 3000HV which has a capacity for 3000VA but from what I've understood recently what i need to focus is the INPUT which is 220V with 18A, and with that I think i should get a regulator that has a capacity for 4000 Watts????
Which has to be a huuuge regulator, so I must be missing something or doing something wrong.
Am i starting to understand how I have to do this and if so then I really have to get a 4000watt voltage regulator???
Or is it possible to use something like a 2400W regulator?
What do I do?
The UPS I want to protect:
I got the 220V data from the contact it is currently connected to.
And I got the 18A from the tag behind the thingy.

Picture that I took of the tag:
https://pasteboard.co/IPnq5Sy.jpg
 
Mar 2, 2020
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a very shortcut solution is that please check how many watts of load is running on ups. your UPS is 3000VA or almost 2400 watts and load on ups will be i think 50%. if ups is running on 50% load. it means the total running load is 1200 Watt. So simply purchase a 1500VA Voltage regulator for proper 220V output. It will be a cheaper solution.
Moreover for your kind information ups normally have builtin voltage regulator. so no need to buy external voltage regulator. Now suppose if there is too much fluctuation in voltages then ups will go on back up mode when its incoming voltages will be out of tolerance otherwise it will run fine. so kindly check whether your ups is going on back up mode again and again. if yes then buy a voltage regulator otherwise no need to even buy any regulator.
 
Reactions: Basht
What kind of regulator do you need? Voltage regulator (to make sure your UPS always gets 220V, whatever the voltage in the outlet is)? Or surge protector (to make sure no high-voltage surge from eg lighting reaches the UPS)?

And to be honest - the company which sold you the UPS should be your first point of contact.
 
Reactions: Basht

Basht

Prominent
Jan 10, 2020
12
0
510
0
What kind of regulator do you need? Voltage regulator (to make sure your UPS always gets 220V, whatever the voltage in the outlet is)? Or surge protector (to make sure no high-voltage surge from eg lighting reaches the UPS)?

And to be honest - the company which sold you the UPS should be your first point of contact.
A voltage regulator (to make sure my UPS always gets 220V) Let's say the outlet has 220V, im just wondering if the regulator has to be something really big and if the regulator's output matters and if it really has to be higher than the UPS' input in Watt using the typical Voltage*Current=Watt???
 
I cant answer your question from practice, but on theory: If your load draws 2000VA off UPS, in normal mode, this means that UPS draws (at least) 2000VA as well, meaning that the outlet UPS is plugged into (whether wall outlet, or other "filter" / "regulator") must provide these 2000VA as well.
 
Reactions: Basht
Mar 2, 2020
5
1
10
1
a very shortcut solution is that please check how many watts of load is running on ups. your UPS is 3000VA or almost 2400 watts and load on ups will be i think 50%. if ups is running on 50% load. it means the total running load is 1200 Watt. So simply purchase a 1500VA Voltage regulator for proper 220V output. It will be a cheaper solution.
Moreover for your kind information ups normally have builtin voltage regulator. so no need to buy external voltage regulator. Now suppose if there is too much fluctuation in voltages then ups will go on back up mode when its incoming voltages will be out of tolerance otherwise it will run fine. so kindly check whether your ups is going on back up mode again and again. if yes then buy a voltage regulator otherwise no need to even buy any regulator.
 
Reactions: Basht

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