[SOLVED] Reliable display

philhay

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Sep 19, 2014
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Hi,
I'm going to need a new display soon. I'm not too worried about features but I'd like to get a display that is going to last a while. Reliability isn't something that comes into reviews because this is something that is proven over time and a statistically valid number of displays.

Has any manufacturer or display type got a better reputation than others? I'm not really looking for a rugged display because I'm not moving it around. It isn't so much about the warranty - although that is maybe a good indication of the faith a manufacturer has in their own display, I'd just like one that has a good chance of lasting a long time.

Thanks for any thoughts.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Can't say I've had an LCD burn out on me in use. My ASUS VE278 is still going after 9 years (as of this month exactly)

I did pull an old Samsung 4:3 out of storage to replace a failing Dell, only to have it fail a few days later. But we are talking at least ten year old hardware at the time(And the Dell had been used 72 hours a week for like 8 years straight.)

That said, Dell, decent in terms of longevity if you go with their business models. They offer some decent gaming panels as well.

Typically power supply that fails, so if you get one that has an external power brick, that could be more replaceable than an integrated one.

Backlights these days are LED, so not much chance of outright failure. Go for one that has some vents in it, avoid ones that are completely closed off.

Honestly not that many people making LCD panels, just the assemblers and a lot of re-branding going on. LG, Samsung, AU Optronics (fast gaming panels), InnoLux, Sharp. And others that make mostly televisions.
 
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Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Can't say I've had an LCD burn out on me in use. My ASUS VE278 is still going after 9 years (as of this month exactly)

I did pull an old Samsung 4:3 out of storage to replace a failing Dell, only to have it fail a few days later. But we are talking at least ten year old hardware at the time(And the Dell had been used 72 hours a week for like 8 years straight.)

That said, Dell, decent in terms of longevity if you go with their business models. They offer some decent gaming panels as well.

Typically power supply that fails, so if you get one that has an external power brick, that could be more replaceable than an integrated one.

Backlights these days are LED, so not much chance of outright failure. Go for one that has some vents in it, avoid ones that are completely closed off.

Honestly not that many people making LCD panels, just the assemblers and a lot of re-branding going on. LG, Samsung, AU Optronics (fast gaming panels), InnoLux, Sharp. And others that make mostly televisions.
 
Reactions: philhay

philhay

Honorable
Sep 19, 2014
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Thanks for that. Definitely some things to consider. I had thought about one with an external power supply. I know some capacitors would be in an external power supply, so I suppose that gives you a chance if they go.

In terms of TN, VA or IPS presumably that is all technology within the panel and no one is less likely to develop problems than another? I've thought about manufacturers of the panel before and it's why I went for an LG TV, which has been ok.

It'll be interesting is the EU 'right to repair' means we can keep future tech going a bit longer.
 

Eximo

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TN vs IPS/PLS vs VA are essentially different ways to do the same job. TN being the older technology it could be considered more mature and less prone to failure. IPS has been around a long time as well.

OLED is probably the only one to worry about due to burn in, but there are few monitors as of yet using that technology.

Monitors and TVs aren't really that bad when it comes to repair. Not much can be done if the LCD gets damaged. Power supply and backlight driver being the common failures, usually capacitors and those are easily sourced since they are off the shelf parts.

Scalar chips and logic on the board aren't too likely to fail, but even they did, it is expecting a lot of a company to keep those parts around and make them available (ie whole logic boards), always going to be marching forward on capabilities. Right to repair is more focused on laptops, smartphones, consoles, vehicles, etc where there is a lot of value in keeping them operating and the only thing preventing it is parts/software from the manufacturer.

I understand both sides. Keeping your IP intact so people don't duplicate your technology makes sense (though given how often these companies sue each other, seems like they have enough protection there). Keeping small repair shops from providing services you aren't willing to is another matter entirely. If these companies offered competent repair services, they could be making that profit instead. But they would rather you buy the next product, since it is more profit to them. (Automotive repair and maintenance is a larger business then production, for example, so OEMs offer repairs and parts)

Worst part of a lot of the electronics stuff is, that you can, with a lot of effort, buy off the shelf components to build a laptop or smartphone. Just not economical and it will never have the polish of a full R&D and production cycle. I just think it is silly how often they want people to replace them. Every improvement equals "can we make it smaller or lighter" I would rather it stay heavier and larger and last an extra hour or two on the battery and not be flimsy, but I guess I am in the minority there. Only so thin you can make a smartphone before it can be broken in half with a light squeeze.
 

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