Question Replace router, or get an access point

I actually already bought a ubiquiti access point, the lite version, but i'd still like to ask what would be the better option?

My ISP router is fine, but the range of it isn't good enough, and since it's fiber I can't move it to the center of the house.
I'm trying to understand why anyone would replace the router instead of buying an access point.

As for me, I intend to actually just turn off the router's wifi so that it doesn't interfere with the ubiquiti one that would be installed smackdown in the center of my house, hopefully getting wifi all the way throughout the house.
 
Many people believe "all ISP routers are junk". Years ago when wifi radio chips were fairly expensive the ISP used cheap ones. Now days the ISP use the same radio chipset as the brand name routers do.

Now some people want their own router not so much because of the wifi but because the router has some feature the ISP router does not. ISP routers are simple devices because your average consumer just wants a box that magically provides them the ability to surf the internet. Most people do not need/want things like parental controls or NAS support or many other features.

In your case you are in effect replacing the routers radios. It will work fine, I assume you are connecting the AP via a ethernet cable. The key reason it will work better is the central location of the radio. Replacing the router..assuming you were still restricted on placment by the fiber..does not solve the problem. Most ISP routers transmit at the same maximum legal power as any other router. Even if it didn't it does not change your end device. If it does not have enough signal power to transmit to the current router it could still not talk to a different router.
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
I actually already bought a ubiquiti access point, the lite version, but i'd still like to ask what would be the better option?

My ISP router is fine, but the range of it isn't good enough, and since it's fiber I can't move it to the center of the house.
I'm trying to understand why anyone would replace the router instead of buying an access point.

As for me, I intend to actually just turn off the router's wifi so that it doesn't interfere with the ubiquiti one that would be installed smackdown in the center of my house, hopefully getting wifi all the way throughout the house.
A Ubiquiti Lite and the ISP router will probably perform about the same from the same location. To get good WIFI, you need multiple WIFI source geographically distributed in your house. Ethernet cable is the best answer. Then MoCA (coax), then powerline. Worst option (which won't work with Ubiquiti to non-Ubiquiti) is wireless mesh.
 
A Ubiquiti Lite and the ISP router will probably perform about the same from the same location. To get good WIFI, you need multiple WIFI source geographically distributed in your house. Ethernet cable is the best answer. Then MoCA (coax), then powerline. Worst option (which won't work with Ubiquiti to non-Ubiquiti) is wireless mesh.
my house isn't that big, but it has thick concrete walls on some of the rooms.
Here's a little sketch of my apartment. As mentioned, I can't move the router easily.
In the thick walled room, if you do so much as turn your back to the router, wifi cuts out, and if you don't it's 2-3 bars.
In the red zones rooms, you either get 1 bar or not even detect the network.
View: https://imgur.com/LWxSASl



My question boils down to, was getting a new access point, and putting it in the hallway (I will put it in my ceiling, though my dropped ceilings in that area is made of metal.) A good idea?
Or should I just have replaced the router with one that has better range and would reach the house from there?
 
Maybe the better question is why do you think a different router would have better range.

The only way you are going to even think to find information like this is to get the FCCID of the devices and look up the test results they are required to file. From what I have seen almost all routers have very similar output number all near the maximum allowed by law.
 
Maybe the better question is why do you think a different router would have better range.

The only way you are going to even think to find information like this is to get the FCCID of the devices and look up the test results they are required to file. From what I have seen almost all routers have very similar output number all near the maximum allowed by law.
Then, aside from security features, a 1000$ asus rapture whatever router has the exact same antennas and range as my probably less than 50$ ISP router?
(Yes, I know that has wifi 6 and a 10gig port and stuff, but I ment in general)
 
Yes unless you get into the messy things of including the speed at some given distance. Too many variables to make a meaningful comparison when you do that. You can pretty much setup a test case that makes any router win.

It actually is not even straight forward when you include simpler stuff in mimo because the way the output power is calculated is different. In some ways a simple signal will go father because it is allowed slightly more output power....but it gets complex very fast.

Bottom line the distance the signal goes is purely a function of the power output which is 1 watt.

The issue most people have is it is not the router that is the cause of the problems in most cases. Things like cell phones have tiny antenna and use lower power transmitters to save battery power. So the signal may get from the router to the phone but the signal is too weak to get back.
 
You need to KEEP your router as is and add the AP in the middle of your "red" zone. Maybe in the hallway between the bedrooms.
That's the plan.
Yes unless you get into the messy things of including the speed at some given distance. Too many variables to make a meaningful comparison when you do that. You can pretty much setup a test case that makes any router win.

It actually is not even straight forward when you include simpler stuff in mimo because the way the output power is calculated is different. In some ways a simple signal will go father because it is allowed slightly more output power....but it gets complex very fast.

Bottom line the distance the signal goes is purely a function of the power output which is 1 watt.

The issue most people have is it is not the router that is the cause of the problems in most cases. Things like cell phones have tiny antenna and use lower power transmitters to save battery power. So the signal may get from the router to the phone but the signal is too weak to get back.
Okay, so basically A better router does have better range, but that's not my main issue?
 

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