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[SOLVED] Replaced GPU Fan, no temp changes

Mk782001

Reputable
Sep 8, 2015
104
0
4,690
1
Hey Guys,
A few weeks back, someone suggested to replace my broken 1060 GPU fan (which was crap btw) with another fan (a wayyy better fan) I don't see any temperature differences. Both gave me 91-92C at 100% Load which doesn't thermal throttle me but still is pretty high, even after replacing the fan.
Am I doing something wrong here? and yeah, the new fan is a case fan but i'm sure it's better and I've plugged it into sys_fan2 slot of my motherboard, at 1528rpm at max I think, well that's what my bios would show.
Again, am I doing something wrong here?
I'm very poor to buy anything else, soo please kindly do not recommend a purchase.
 

Grobe

Distinguished
No, you haven't done anything wrong, nor was it wrong to replace a "crappy fan".

What you should know is that the whole cooling system consist of multiple layers with thermal resistance between each, all the way from the transistors inside to the surface on the cobber/alu cooler to the air.
Every layer have a thermal resistance to the next - e.g. GPU surface to thermal paste and then thermal paste to the GPU cooler. And then the GPU cooler to air, that is only a minor part of the full picture.

Furthermore, the GPU cooler also have a relatively high thermal mass, so that it dampens quick changes in temperature.

All in all, it means slight difference in fan speed in normal cases isn't capable to reduce the temperature that much.
 
Reactions: Mk782001

Grobe

Distinguished
No, you haven't done anything wrong, nor was it wrong to replace a "crappy fan".

What you should know is that the whole cooling system consist of multiple layers with thermal resistance between each, all the way from the transistors inside to the surface on the cobber/alu cooler to the air.
Every layer have a thermal resistance to the next - e.g. GPU surface to thermal paste and then thermal paste to the GPU cooler. And then the GPU cooler to air, that is only a minor part of the full picture.

Furthermore, the GPU cooler also have a relatively high thermal mass, so that it dampens quick changes in temperature.

All in all, it means slight difference in fan speed in normal cases isn't capable to reduce the temperature that much.
 
Reactions: Mk782001

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
What you did makes sense, BUT you have made a significant change in HOW the GPU chip cooling is controlled. On almost all fan-cooled graphics cards, the speed of the fan on the card is controlled by the card itself. There is NO standard way for the GPU chip's temperature (and hence cooling needs) can be sent to the mobo. However, with your change, you now have a different fan but its speed is being controlled by the temperature at a sensor on the MOTHERBOARD, and not by the temp of the GPU chip. If you want to be SURE the GPU chip is well-cooled and maybe OVER-cooled, I suggest you change the configuration of the SYS_FAN2 header where it is plugged in to run at max speed all the time.

In some cases it might be possible to find the video card's fan control signal and use that, but that is more complex and I doubt you want to get into that.
 
Reactions: Mk782001

Mk782001

Reputable
Sep 8, 2015
104
0
4,690
1
What you did makes sense, BUT you have made a significant change in HOW the GPU chip cooling is controlled. On almost all fan-cooled graphics cards, the speed of the fan on the card is controlled by the card itself. There is NO standard way for the GPU chip's temperature (and hence cooling needs) can be sent to the mobo. However, with your change, you now have a different fan but its speed is being controlled by the temperature at a sensor on the MOTHERBOARD, and not by the temp of the GPU chip. If you want to be SURE the GPU chip is well-cooled and maybe OVER-cooled, I suggest you change the configuration of the SYS_FAN2 header where it is plugged in to run at max speed all the time.

In some cases it might be possible to find the video card's fan control signal and use that, but that is more complex and I doubt you want to get into that.
Ohh yeah, I kept sys-fan2 at max rpm all the time for that. I guess it's all n all fine
 

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