Aug 25, 2021
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A few weeks ago, my computer went out. My dual monitors showed a solid green color and a solid red color, then went completely black.

Now, I've replaced the graphics cards, didn't show anything. Replaced the motherboard, still didn't show anything. As a note, the motherboard shows the code "AA", which should mean everything is okay, but it still won't show anything on my monitors. Also, I've replaced my graphics card and mother board with the exact same ones I had before.

Graphics card:
EVGA GeForce GTX 960 4GB SSC GAMING ACX 2.0+

Motherboard:
ASUS X99-A/USB 3.1 ATX DDR4 3300 (o.c.) Intel LGA 2011

I've tried turning it on with only 1 RAM card each time, with the 4 RAM cards I have, and nothing works.

I'm at my wit's end at what to do next. Any help is appreciated.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Well, replacing the motherboard would have dealt with re-seating the CPU and the GPU. Have you tried any of the other PCIe slots? Possible your CPU is damaged and just enough to prevent the main PCIe slot from working, or when the GPU blew up (if it did) it damaged the CPU.

Changed the cable powering the GPU?

Checked your monitor cables?

Checked the monitors? (again an exploding GPU can do nasty things)

When troubleshooting there should be an absolute minimum of components, so all your drives and other devices should be as disconnected as possible.
 
Aug 25, 2021
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Well, replacing the motherboard would have dealt with re-seating the CPU and the GPU. Have you tried any of the other PCIe slots? Possible your CPU is damaged and just enough to prevent the main PCIe slot from working, or when the GPU blew up (if it did) it damaged the CPU.

Changed the cable powering the GPU?

Checked your monitor cables?

Checked the monitors? (again an exploding GPU can do nasty things)

When troubleshooting there should be an absolute minimum of components, so all your drives and other devices should be as disconnected as possible.
I did not think of the cable to the graphics card being damaged. I will have to replace that. I also did not think the CPU could have been damaged, but that makes sense. I will have to get a replacement for that as well. Thank you for the advice, I will look into that.
 
Aug 25, 2021
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Well, replacing the motherboard would have dealt with re-seating the CPU and the GPU. Have you tried any of the other PCIe slots? Possible your CPU is damaged and just enough to prevent the main PCIe slot from working, or when the GPU blew up (if it did) it damaged the CPU.

Changed the cable powering the GPU?

Checked your monitor cables?

Checked the monitors? (again an exploding GPU can do nasty things)

When troubleshooting there should be an absolute minimum of components, so all your drives and other devices should be as disconnected as possible.
Would the motherboard still say "AA" if the CPU was damaged though?
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Long as the system boots, sure. It just assumes there is nothing on the other end, at least when it comes to the CPU connected PCIe slots.

I've had motherboards with bad memory slots, still posts. In that case nothing wrong with the CPU since I did send that board to someone that wanted it and it still didn't work. Don't think I have run into a failed PCIe connection, but it is possible.

Your description points to a failure of something related to the GPU, but all you have left is the CPU and memory essentially.

Power supply maybe, but you say the system is booting. Doesn't rule out a problem with the PCIe power cables though.

Has the replacement GPU been tested?
 
Aug 25, 2021
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Long as the system boots, sure. It just assumes there is nothing on the other end, at least when it comes to the CPU connected PCIe slots.

I've had motherboards with bad memory slots, still posts. In that case nothing wrong with the CPU since I did send that board to someone that wanted it and it still didn't work. Don't think I have run into a failed PCIe connection, but it is possible.

Your description points to a failure of something related to the GPU, but all you have left is the CPU and memory essentially.

Power supply maybe, but you say the system is booting. Doesn't rule out a problem with the PCIe power cables though.

Has the replacement GPU been tested?
No, I have not tested the replacement GPU. Do you know how I can test it without the display showing on a monitor?

I just want to make sure of this. When you are referring to GPU, you are talking about the graphics card replacement, correct?
 
The simplest option here could be that your original graphic card died and replacement was DOA. Which is why you should test the replacement GPU (by putting it in another machine). That should be a start, otherwise you are shooting in the dark and possibly replacing perfectly good components for no reason.
 
Aug 25, 2021
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The simplest option here could be that your original graphic card died and replacement was DOA. Which is why you should test the replacement GPU (by putting it in another machine). That should be a start, otherwise you are shooting in the dark and possibly replacing perfectly good components for no reason.
So, unfortunately, I don't have another computer to just put in that big GTX 960. But I did do something like a reverse test. I took the graphics card out of my spare computer, and put it into the main computer that I'm trying to fix. Even though I know that spare graphics card works with the spare computer, it wouldn't work at all with the main computer. (I put it back into the spare computer and it works fine.)

Based on this, would it most likely mean that it's not the graphics card that is bad, but perhaps the CPU? As a note, the spare graphics card does not require an external power cord to the power supply, so it means that the cord was definitely not an issue there.

I think I should get a replacement CPU.
 
But I did do something like a reverse test. I took the graphics card out of my spare computer, and put it into the main computer that I'm trying to fix. Even though I know that spare graphics card works with the spare computer, it wouldn't work at all with the main computer. (I put it back into the spare computer and it works fine.)
Good enough for a test. But all it tells us the problem is not (limited) to GPU. That is, we don't know if new GPU is good, but there is certainly something else that's bad. Unfortunately we still have no clue what is bad. Might be CPU, might be something else. I would not rule out bad power supply either. At this point you really have two options: swap components blindly until you hit the right one; or take the PC to the repair shop. Chances are the second option might be much faster and cheaper, but that depends if you have any reputable shop locally.
 

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