[SOLVED] Replacing H110i Stock Fans

Jul 31, 2019
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Hi there, i'm using Corsair H110i 280mm AIO. Stock fans making so much noise, which is SP140L

So i changed thoose with Thermaltake Blue Riing 14 ( it's a gift from a friend )

I made a comprasion between SP140L and Blue Riing 14

SP140L - 2000 RPM@104 CFM 4-Pin

Riing 14 Blue - 1500 RPM@52 CFM 3-Pin

and i maxed out the fans and did couple of Cinebench R20 ( My cpu 3700x bt )

and the diffrence was like 1-2 c at maximum and average, TT Riing is so quiet than SP140L

So question is how the difference is low like 1-2c between 104cfm and 52cfm.
 
The Arctic fans you mention have LESS air flow max and LOWER max backpressure than the Corsair PS140L ones you have already. Their noise specs are given using a different system that cannot be compared easily to the dBA spec of your Corsair fans, so I cannot tell whether they would be quieter. But they may give you LESS cooling.

You already get better cooling (but only a small bit better?) with the Corsair fans. I am not quite clear whether that happens ONLY when they are running full speed and being significantly noisier than the ThermalTake Riing fans. If that's the case and you are willing to work with just slightly higher CPU temperatures to get substantially lower noise, then do that. I doubt the Arctic fans would do better. The Noctua NF-A14 iPPC 2000 PWM fans would give you good (maybe better at high workloads) cooling with less noise, but they would cost quite a bit more, I agree.
 
Static pressure

Assuming the SP140L are like the SP140. They generate 1.17mmH2O at 1440RPM. They also move 50CFM at 1440RPM.

The Riing 14 Blue generate 1.58mmH2O at 1400RPM. They move 50CFM at 1440RPM.

Now the crux of it is. The CFM rating is for free air movement. A restricted environment like an air filter or heatsink greatly affects how much air can get through. As the Riing 14 Blue generates a higher static pressure. It does a better job overcoming that resistance. So, it maintains a much higher percentage of its CFM rating at any given RPM.

All these fans are laughable in the static pressure arena compared to the Noctua NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 PWM. Which generates 4.18 mmH20 at 2000 RPM. These can blast air through a heatsink. Even these are nothing to the iPPC-3000 which generates 10.52 mmH20 at 3000RPM. I used two of these to keep a nine GPU mining rig cooled in a garage during the summer. Pulling air through a Merv 12 HEPA filter. They are not quiet.
 
Jul 31, 2019
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Static pressure

Assuming the SP140L are like the SP140. They generate 1.17mmH2O at 1440RPM. They also move 50CFM at 1440RPM.

The Riing 14 Blue generate 1.58mmH2O at 1400RPM. They move 50CFM at 1440RPM.

Now the crux of it is. The CFM rating is for free air movement. A restricted environment like an air filter or heatsink greatly affects how much air can get through. As the Riing 14 Blue generates a higher static pressure. It does a better job overcoming that resistance. So, it maintains a much higher percentage of its CFM rating at any given RPM.

All these fans are laughable in the static pressure arena compared to the Noctua NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 PWM. Which generates 4.18 mmH20 at 2000 RPM. These can blast air through a heatsink. Even these are nothing to the iPPC-3000 which generates 10.52 mmH20 at 3000RPM. I used two of these to keep a nine GPU mining rig cooled in a garage during the summer. Pulling air through a Merv 12 HEPA filter. They are not quiet.
Thanks for a reply and help.

So in this situation, should i keep using the TT Riings?

Or i am thinking about buy a new Arctic P14 PWM PST x2, is it will be worthy?

I heard about Noctua NF-A14 but they are loud
 
velocity4 is on the right track, but used the wrong specs. The H110i system comes with SP140L fans which are NOT the same as the older SP140's. The SP140L have specs of max speed 2000 RPM delivering max airflow of 113 CFM and generating noise at 43 dBA. Pressure rating is 4 mm water.

To help understand these specs, any fan can deliver its max air flow when there is NO backpressure - that is, nothing in the air flow path to reduce air flow, At higher flow resistance (backpressure) the actual flow is reduced. VERY roughly, if you sketch a graph of air flow vs backpressure, it is a straight line from max air flow (113 CFM here) at zero backpressure, down to zero effective air flow at the max pressure rating, 4 mm water. This line is generated for the fan running at full speed, of course, since these are max specs.

The Blue Riing 14 fans have specs of 1400 RPM, 51 CFM, 28 dBA (much quieter) and 1.6 mm water. If you sketch the lines for both fans on the same graph paper you will see the Termaltake never generates as much air flow, no matter what the backpressure, as the Corsair units - they are just very different fans. But again, that is if BOTH are presumed to be running at max speed. HOWEVER, in actual use what does happen is the automatic fan speed control system adjusts the fans on the AIO rad to whatever speed it takes to keep the TEMPERATURE inside the CPU chip (it has a sensor inside) on target. So, since the SP140L's generate much more air flow for the same backpressure and speed, they actually operate at much less than their max speed to give this much cooling. In doing so, their noise also is much lower and comparable to the Thermaltake Riing 14 fan's noise at higher speeds. Net result is you don't see much difference. By the way, since the Riing 14 is a 3-pin fan, the H110i system MAY actually run them at max speed all the time because it MAY be using the new PWM Mode to control the speed of the 4-pin fans it was designed for.

What IS different, though, is reserve capacity. To provide the actual cooling (air flow) required under your current conditions, the Thermaltake Riing fans are up close to max speed; if your future use demands more cooling, there's a limit to how much they can give. (IF the H110i system is already running them at full speed because of its control Mode, then there is NO reserve capacity left.) But the Corsair SP140L's can be run much faster (more air flow and more noise) later IF your workload requires it. For your current uses, there is no real advantage for noise reduction from either fan pair.

The Noctua NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 PWM, a VERY high-flow fan, has max specs 2000 RPM, 182.5m³/hr (107 CFM), 31.5 dBA, 4.2 mm water. These are VERY similar to the specs for the Corsair SP140L fan you have already. But their less-powerful model, the NF-A14 PWM you mentioned (NOTE that PWM suffix there) has max specs 1500 RPM, 140 m³/hr (82 CFM), 24.6 dBA and 2.1 mm water. On the airflow vs backpressure graph it falls between the Corsair SP140L and the Thermaltake Riing 14 fans. Thus the high-performance Noctua NF-A14 IndustrialPPC PWM model can give you pretty much the same performance as the Corsair fans you have, but probably at quieter noise levels for most fan speeds.

IF you choose to get those high-performance Noctuas as replacements, just a small note. Noctua supplies their fans with included small devices called "Low Noise Adapters". Optionally you can insert these into the connections where you plug in the fan. All they do is reduce the voltage supplied to the fan and make it run slower for less noise, but also LESS air flow. They are very useful if you connect your fans to a fixed 12 VDC power supply directly from the PSU but want them to run a constant reduced speed. But in your case with the fans connected via the output leads from the pump unit of the H110i system, do NOT use them. All they would do is limit the maximum speed your fans can run when max cooling is needed. In almost all other situations, automatic control of the fans would make them run at exactly the same air flow and speed and NOISE level as if you do not use the Adapter.
 
Jul 31, 2019
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velocity4 is on the right track, but used the wrong specs. The H110i system comes with SP140L fans which are NOT the same as the older SP140's. The SP140L have specs of max speed 2000 RPM delivering max airflow of 113 CFM and generating noise at 43 dBA. Pressure rating is 4 mm water.

To help understand these specs, any fan can deliver its max air flow when there is NO backpressure - that is, nothing in the air flow path to reduce air flow, At higher flow resistance (backpressure) the actual flow is reduced. VERY roughly, if you sketch a graph of air flow vs backpressure, it is a straight line from max air flow (113 CFM here) at zero backpressure, down to zero effective air flow at the max pressure rating, 4 mm water. This line is generated for the fan running at full speed, of course, since these are max specs.

The Blue Riing 14 fans have specs of 1400 RPM, 51 CFM, 28 dBA (much quieter) and 1.6 mm water. If you sketch the lines for both fans on the same graph paper you will see the Termaltake never generates as much air flow, no matter what the backpressure, as the Corsair units - they are just very different fans. But again, that is if BOTH are presumed to be running at max speed. HOWEVER, in actual use what does happen is the automatic fan speed control system adjusts the fans on the AIO rad to whatever speed it takes to keep the TEMPERATURE inside the CPU chip (it has a sensor inside) on target. So, since the SP140L's generate much more air flow for the same backpressure and speed, they actually operate at much less than their max speed to give this much cooling. In doing so, their noise also is much lower and comparable to the Thermaltake Riing 14 fan's noise at higher speeds. Net result is you don't see much difference. By the way, since the Riing 14 is a 3-pin fan, the H110i system MAY actually run them at max speed all the time because it MAY be using the new PWM Mode to control the speed of the 4-pin fans it was designed for.

What IS different, though, is reserve capacity. To provide the actual cooling (air flow) required under your current conditions, the Thermaltake Riing fans are up close to max speed; if your future use demands more cooling, there's a limit to how much they can give. (IF the H110i system is already running them at full speed because of its control Mode, then there is NO reserve capacity left.) But the Corsair SP140L's can be run much faster (more air flow and more noise) later IF your workload requires it. For your current uses, there is no real advantage for noise reduction from either fan pair.

The Noctua NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 PWM, a VERY high-flow fan, has max specs 2000 RPM, 182.5m³/hr (107 CFM), 31.5 dBA, 4.2 mm water. These are VERY similar to the specs for the Corsair SP140L fan you have already. But their less-powerful model, the NF-A14 PWM you mentioned (NOTE that PWM suffix there) has max specs 1500 RPM, 140 m³/hr (82 CFM), 24.6 dBA and 2.1 mm water. On the airflow vs backpressure graph it falls between the Corsair SP140L and the Thermaltake Riing 14 fans. Thus the high-performance Noctua NF-A14 IndustrialPPC PWM model can give you pretty much the same performance as the Corsair fans you have, but probably at quieter noise levels for most fan speeds.

IF you choose to get those high-performance Noctuas as replacements, just a small note. Noctua supplies their fans with included small devices called "Low Noise Adapters". Optionally you can insert these into the connections where you plug in the fan. All they do is reduce the voltage supplied to the fan and make it run slower for less noise, but also LESS air flow. They are very useful if you connect your fans to a fixed 12 VDC power supply directly from the PSU but want them to run a constant reduced speed. But in your case with the fans connected via the output leads from the pump unit of the H110i system, do NOT use them. All they would do is limit the maximum speed your fans can run when max cooling is needed. In almost all other situations, automatic control of the fans would make them run at exactly the same air flow and speed and NOISE level as if you do not use the Adapter.
Thanks for replying, that's a little bit complex respond for me :)

But i can explain like this

My case is cooler master mastercase 5

Radiator mounted to front and the fans are intake to the radiator and i connected them to H110i pump

Thermaltake is 3 pin but still can be controlled by the iCue. I'm using them with custom curve for daily usage.

When i switch the SP140L 4 Pin with custom curve which is getting high rpm with high temprature.

There is just 1c temprature difference, when i maxed out theese 2 two fans and run prime95 , peak temp difference is 2C. And SP140L at 2000 RPM making so much noise

What should i do in this stutaion, keep using TT Blue Riings? or switching to SP140L ?

3700X Auto - Prime95 Peak Temp With SP140L : 76,5c

3700X Auto - Prime95 Peak Temp With TT Riing Blue : 78,3c

Noctua looking great but it's expensive to me. I'm just thinking buy Arctic P14 PWM PST or just will use my own fans.

This is the case and radiator position btw.

View: https://imgur.com/a/JPj2zPt
 
The Arctic fans you mention have LESS air flow max and LOWER max backpressure than the Corsair PS140L ones you have already. Their noise specs are given using a different system that cannot be compared easily to the dBA spec of your Corsair fans, so I cannot tell whether they would be quieter. But they may give you LESS cooling.

You already get better cooling (but only a small bit better?) with the Corsair fans. I am not quite clear whether that happens ONLY when they are running full speed and being significantly noisier than the ThermalTake Riing fans. If that's the case and you are willing to work with just slightly higher CPU temperatures to get substantially lower noise, then do that. I doubt the Arctic fans would do better. The Noctua NF-A14 iPPC 2000 PWM fans would give you good (maybe better at high workloads) cooling with less noise, but they would cost quite a bit more, I agree.
 

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