Question Replacing Motherboard without Reinstalling Windows

Sep 8, 2020
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Hi everyone,

I'm currently using Core i5 6400 and considering to buy either Asus Prime B550M-A (Wifi) or Asus TUF Gaming B550 Plus (Please help me choose) with Ryzen 5 5600x.

The biggest concern is that can it run fine without having to reinstalling Windows ?
I'm too busy to reinstalling Windows and all my applications. Also, my Windows license is Digital license linked with Microsoft account, which mean it should be if I just login to my Microsoft account right ?

And of course before upgrading to Ryzen, I'll uninstall all Intel's driver first.

Thanks for any reply.
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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There is no 100% Yes or No.

With a new motherboard and existing Win install, there are 3 possible outcomes:
  1. It boots up just fine
  2. It fails completely
  3. It boots up, but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.
I've seen all 3. Win 10 is much better than previous versions, but by no means 100% always works without issues..

We'd all like it to be so. Unfortunately, it isn't.

A clean install is strongly recommended, often required.
Especially when changing from old Intel to new Ryzen.
 
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jasonf2

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Oct 11, 2015
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While I think you can technically get it to run in my experience you will be much happier if you just reinstall it. Drivers and subsystem stuff are a huge mess that even with registry editing will probably never be right. It will also more than likely kick out your windows activation and depending on your license you my end up having to purchase a new windows license anyway.
 
Sep 8, 2020
24
0
10
0
There is no 100% Yes or No.

With a new motherboard and existing Win install, there are 3 possible outcomes:
  1. It boots up just fine
  2. It fails completely
  3. It boots up, but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.
I've seen all 3. Win 10 is much better than previous versions, but by no means 100% always works without issues..

We'd all like it to be so. Unfortunately, it isn't.

A clean install is strongly recommended, often required.
Especially when changing from old Intel to new Ryzen.
is there a way to reinstall Windows but keep all other software's setting and data ?

I know I shouldn't worry about my Windows setting because those can be recovered after sync with Microsoft account.

But most software just don't have ability to port / backup setting and preferences
 

jasonf2

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Oct 11, 2015
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Definitely do that. Microsoft has one of the most convoluted, multi tiered license models you will ever deal with. If you can get it released to rebind you will be fine. If you don't get it released you will end up calling Microsoft and depending on your license type it not only takes forever you will be stuck in the question of is this a new computer or a hardware update. I would hate to know how long it would take with Covid.
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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is there a way to reinstall Windows but keep all other software's setting and data ?

I know I shouldn't worry about my Windows setting because those can be recovered after sync with Microsoft account.

But most software just don't have ability to port / backup setting and preferences
No, there is not.

When an application is installed, it makes dozens, or thousands, of entries in the Registry.
The new OS knows nothing about these.

Yes, it sux. But thats the way it is.
 
Hi everyone,

I'm currently using Core i5 6400 and considering to buy either Asus Prime B550M-A (Wifi) or Asus TUF Gaming B550 Plus (Please help me choose) with Ryzen 5 5600x.

The biggest concern is that can it run fine without having to reinstalling Windows ?
I'm too busy to reinstalling Windows and all my applications. Also, my Windows license is Digital license linked with Microsoft account, which mean it should be if I just login to my Microsoft account right ?

And of course before upgrading to Ryzen, I'll uninstall all Intel's driver first.

Thanks for any reply.
For the motherboard choice: the B550 TUF Gaming Plus is a much better choice and leaves you ample upgrade opportunity all the way up to a 5950X. But the B550m-a PRIME would do for a 5600X if budget is an issue just don't expect it to handle a 5900X or 5950X.

You might get it to boot but you'll almost definitely be chasing phantoms if you don't do a clean install of Windows. Since you've a digital license it's really easy to validate again so that shouldn't be a problem. If you really insist on trying it first you can also do a 'repair install with in place upgrade'. If that's buggy after, then do the clean install. It's up to how venturesome you might be.
 
Sep 8, 2020
24
0
10
0
For the motherboard choice: the B550 TUF Gaming Plus is a much better choice and leaves you ample upgrade opportunity all the way up to a 5950X. But the B550m-a PRIME would do for a 5600X if budget is an issue just don't expect it to handle a 5900X or 5950X.

You might get it to boot but you'll almost definitely be chasing phantoms if you don't do a clean install of Windows. Since you've a digital license it's really easy to validate again so that shouldn't be a problem. If you really insist on trying it first you can also do a 'repair install with in place upgrade'. If that's buggy after, then do the clean install. It's up to how venturesome you might be.
Yeah I also think that it's better to get the B550 TUF Gaming Plus since it just 10 bucks different with B550 M-A Prime.
Just minus a built-in wifi. But I already have my own USB Wifi adapter anyway.
 
Sep 8, 2020
24
0
10
0
For the motherboard choice: the B550 TUF Gaming Plus is a much better choice and leaves you ample upgrade opportunity all the way up to a 5950X. But the B550m-a PRIME would do for a 5600X if budget is an issue just don't expect it to handle a 5900X or 5950X.

You might get it to boot but you'll almost definitely be chasing phantoms if you don't do a clean install of Windows. Since you've a digital license it's really easy to validate again so that shouldn't be a problem. If you really insist on trying it first you can also do a 'repair install with in place upgrade'. If that's buggy after, then do the clean install. It's up to how venturesome you might be.
Also, do you think that B550 TUF will consume power more than Prime would do ?
B550 TUF is an ATX while Prime is a mATX
 

Karadjgne

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Ambassador
You are under the assumption that 'delete' or 'uninstall' actually works. It doesn't. All they do is remove the address to the files in storage, so Windows can then assign that address to something else. Rarely ever does it remove the associations, orphans and links in the registry.

So you'd boot up, and your pc will go into a loop looking for Intel drivers that don't exist, while trying to simultaneously load amd drivers, often times running into conflicts with addressing. You might get lucky and it works, you'll probably be unlucky and get slowdowns and glitches, or possibly really unlucky and get epic fails.

Reinstalling windows does 2 things. Wipes out all system drivers contained in the windows files and reestablishes a new registry, that does not include any prior bios or OS associations. It's after a reinstall that you'd then update the bios, add motherboard chipset drivers etc as that gets written into windows.

No, a motherboard isn't much more than a bridge. It connects the various stuff plugged into it, whether that's the cpu or gpu or ram. It doesn't use much power by itself.

ATX or mATX or E-ATX or mITX or DTX are all just form factors. Different size of the board. My x570 mITX is identical to its ATX brother, with the exception of some headers for fans, lighting etc. Since the board is 6.7" x 6.7" instead of 9.6" x 12".
 
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No, a motherboard isn't much more than a bridge. It connects the various stuff plugged into it, whether that's the cpu or gpu or ram. It doesn't use much power by itself.
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Have to disagree...and in this comparison it could be pretty significant depending on useage. Reason is the B550 TUF uses very efficient Vishay power stages in the CPU VRM's while the B550 Prime-A uses discrete FET's. Running the same processor in the same processing load the B550 TUF should be more efficient, therefore consuming less power and therefore cooler running for it. That's what makes it a preferable choice, but you do pay for that.
 
Sometimes it is excruciatingly painful to reinstall all apps and settings if you need to do a clean install.

I would first create a known good backup in case anything should go wrong.
I have done this using the samsung ssd migration app to create a working copy of the windows C drive on a samsung ssd. Not a bad thing to do if you are not yet on a ssd, or if your C drive needs to get bigger.

I have not tried this, but apparently there is a sysprep command that sets up windows to move to new hardware.
https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/117979-prepare-windows-for-a-new-cpu-or-motherboard

Once you have set aside the original Windows C drive and are working on the backup:
Run sysprep.

Then you should be able to boot and install the motherboard specific drivers.
This has worked well for me in the past without using sysprep.

One possible bad scenario is if your windows needs a second drive to boot.
That happens if the second drive contains system recovery partitions.

As to the motherboard choices, I have no opinion. Good luck in buying a 5600X at a fair price.
 

Karadjgne

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Have to disagree...and in this comparison it could be pretty significant depending on useage. Reason is the B550 TUF uses very efficient Vishay power stages in the CPU VRM's while the B550 Prime-A uses discrete FET's. Running the same processor in the same processing load the B550 TUF should be more efficient, therefore consuming less power and therefore cooler running for it. That's what makes it a preferable choice, but you do pay for that.
He said motherboard. Nothing about the cpu. By itself, motherboards don't use up much power at all, the differences are minor. It's the addition of the cpu that changes that, big difference in power draw through the VRM's using a 9400f or a 9900k on the same board. Even the difference between the 3700x at 95w and the 3800x at 140w will change the draw. But for the mobo itself, there'll be little to no change in chipset usage power etc.

The entire pc, except cpu/gpu, on average only uses 50-100w. That's including fans, ram, storage etc. That works for Intel or amd. Inconsequential power changes on the whole. Until you add in the cpu and gpu power requirements.
 

Karadjgne

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Exactly. VRM's only supply the cpu in question. They don't supply the 60-90A they are capable of unless the cpu demands that. So different cpus, and let's face it Intel and amd have different power requirements above and beyond different models.
 

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