Question Replacing my AUAU P6T SE motherboard and components

Mar 2, 2021
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I have an older cyberpower computer with an ASUS P6TSE motherboard. The motherboard can't by turned off due to a short or something in it. Otherwise the pc works well.
I now have a newer PC but would like to rebuild the older cyberpower for my mother. My question is when replacing the motherboard with its GPU, CPU, Memory, etc. What parts should I keep and transplant into a new motherboard. What do I look for so that the motherboard is compatible with the rest of the computer. I know how to rebuild a pc but I'm not real sure as far as picking compatible components for the build.
Thanks,
jrdnoland
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Update your post to include current hardware specs, including PSU, for the CyberPower computer.

Budget?

Start with the User Guide/Manual for the ASUS P6TSE motherboard.

The documentation will include some listing of supported components. And likely refer you back to the Asus website for updated information.

Most likely in the form of a QVL (Qualified Vendors' List).

Read carefully. Pay attention to all footnotes, warnings, caveats, etc..

One immediate recommendation: 256 GB SSD as the boot ( C:) drive.

====

That all said:

How have you been shutting down the Cyberpower computer?

The Motherboard's User Guide will most likely include the applicable power related connections between case power switch and motherboard.

You may be able to identify or otherwise discover the reason the P6TSE motherboard cannot be turned off.

Hard shutdowns via the PSU or some power strip serving the PSU will lead to OS and/or data corruption problems on system drives.

Windows needs to be gracefully shutdown.
 
Mar 2, 2021
3
0
10
0
Update your post to include current hardware specs, including PSU, for the CyberPower computer.

Budget?

Start with the User Guide/Manual for the ASUS P6TSE motherboard.

The documentation will include some listing of supported components. And likely refer you back to the Asus website for updated information.

Most likely in the form of a QVL (Qualified Vendors' List).

Read carefully. Pay attention to all footnotes, warnings, caveats, etc..

One immediate recommendation: 256 GB SSD as the boot ( C:) drive.

====

That all said:

How have you been shutting down the Cyberpower computer?

The Motherboard's User Guide will most likely include the applicable power related connections between case power switch and motherboard.

You may be able to identify or otherwise discover the reason the P6TSE motherboard cannot be turned off.

Hard shutdowns via the PSU or some power strip serving the PSU will lead to OS and/or data corruption problems on system drives.

Windows needs to be gracefully shutdown.
Thanks for your reply! Currently I have to shut off the power supply switch to get the computer to shut off. This is the second replacement board (same type) that I've gotten.
All I really want to do is replace the motherboard and perhaps the cpu.

I would like to be able to use my gpi, memory, power supply, case, etc. My question is how to determine what new motherboard would be able to be used in this case with these components.

The owners manual doesn't show any compatible parts in it.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
It is much more tedious to "reverse engineer" to a suitable motherboard that will work for existing components that are on hand. I.e., GPU, CPU, RAM, etc.

Integrated graphics?

I randomly selected an Asus Motherboard. Here is a link to the User Manual:

https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/LGA1200/ROG_MAXIMUS_XII_HERO_(WI-FI)/E16575_ROG_MAXIMUS_XII_HERO_WI-FI_UM_V2_WEB.pdf

Scan the manual overall but start by looking at physically numbered Page vii.

Obviously lots of information with bold print caveats and referral links to Asus's QVL.

The first factor is the motherboard form factor so that will provide some filtering down of mother board options.

Next - budget? How much do you have or want to spend for a new motherboard? Doubt that you need a high end gaming/working motherboard for your Mother. (However that is only a premise.... No offense intended.) :)

What you do next is get the specs for each component you wish to re-use and simply go through the candidate motherboard specifications summaries and literally check and verify that your re-used components will work on any given motherboard. Details matter.

You then need to read through the manual and envision the build you have in mind. Look for and think about any other components/parts that may be needed.

Look at Page 1-4 for example: that is just for the CPU. Likewise for Memory/RAM beginning on Page 1-5.

The system panel header (power, reset, etc.) is covered on Page 1-21. You must ensure that the new motherboard, etc. can be properly shut down. Not via the PSU switch.

People who do builds every day (Full disclosure: I am not one of them) likely know via experience what generally works with what. Even then manufacturer's change specs, support is dropped, standards evolve. And former compatibilities are moot.

My suggestion is that you update your post with the make, model, and detailed specs of all the components you wish to use.

Primarily with only a new Motherboard and CPU as I understand your previous post.

Hopefully someone can look at that list of your components and immediately know (with some reasonable degree of certainty) that all will work on Motherboard X.

Or make other suggestions such as to not reuse some given component for what ever reason(s) is/are applicable.
 
Mar 2, 2021
3
0
10
0
It is much more tedious to "reverse engineer" to a suitable motherboard that will work for existing components that are on hand. I.e., GPU, CPU, RAM, etc.

Integrated graphics?

I randomly selected an Asus Motherboard. Here is a link to the User Manual:

https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/LGA1200/ROG_MAXIMUS_XII_HERO_(WI-FI)/E16575_ROG_MAXIMUS_XII_HERO_WI-FI_UM_V2_WEB.pdf

Scan the manual overall but start by looking at physically numbered Page vii.

Obviously lots of information with bold print caveats and referral links to Asus's QVL.

The first factor is the motherboard form factor so that will provide some filtering down of mother board options.

Next - budget? How much do you have or want to spend for a new motherboard? Doubt that you need a high end gaming/working motherboard for your Mother. (However that is only a premise.... No offense intended.) :)

What you do next is get the specs for each component you wish to re-use and simply go through the candidate motherboard specifications summaries and literally check and verify that your re-used components will work on any given motherboard. Details matter.

You then need to read through the manual and envision the build you have in mind. Look for and think about any other components/parts that may be needed.

Look at Page 1-4 for example: that is just for the CPU. Likewise for Memory/RAM beginning on Page 1-5.

The system panel header (power, reset, etc.) is covered on Page 1-21. You must ensure that the new motherboard, etc. can be properly shut down. Not via the PSU switch.

People who do builds every day (Full disclosure: I am not one of them) likely know via experience what generally works with what. Even then manufacturer's change specs, support is dropped, standards evolve. And former compatibilities are moot.

My suggestion is that you update your post with the make, model, and detailed specs of all the components you wish to use.

Primarily with only a new Motherboard and CPU as I understand your previous post.

Hopefully someone can look at that list of your components and immediately know (with some reasonable degree of certainty) that all will work on Motherboard X.

Or make other suggestions such as to not reuse some given component for what ever reason(s) is/are applicable.
Thanks for all the information, I will start using your advice and see how far I get.
-jrdnoland
 

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