Info Report: Huawei Failed to Remove Backdoors Vodafone Discovered in 2011, 2012

I have my own router and I'd even have my own modem if Virgin would allow me to. In fact, I've asked about sourcing my own, but according to their policies, I can't. One of the few good things about the USA on this matter: you can get your own modems and use them.

That doesn't alleviate the problem of their internal networks, but since it is now public, it will change.

And, yes, all companies say "it's for our clients", but in reality is "we're reducing costs and getting crappier hardware/resources/people".

Cheers!
 

alan.campbell99

Prominent
Sep 11, 2017
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Other than the supplied Nokia modem/routers at the time when it first started I've always used my own DSL modem here which I've been able to do thankfully. The ISP ones were generally shite and that was before I knew about Huawei's shenanigans. I'd only use one as a doorstop now for sure. I have my doubts about recent models and I'd like to get the parents away from theirs and onto a solid alternative once I research it.
 

ginthegit

Honorable
Nov 15, 2012
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Problem is, no matter what you buy you have a back door. Some could say that Intel deliberately put the spectre problems in so that NSA could Hack. I remember that Apple flat down refused to put Backdoor in. Point is though that they all hack to gather information, and no matter whether it is claimed for security or other purposes, it is all illegal.

Note that most Chinese tech is licensed products from other tech like they use the ARM license etc, so chances are that if they have Back-doors, other products do too. They probably cant find the issues to sort them so they don't.

To punish a state for what they as a state does themselves... it is not only hypocritical, it is scandalous.
 

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