Request Cooling Advice

captainjorge

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Sep 9, 2007
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Hi everyone!

I'm graduating from college next month and I'm putting together a little gift for myself. It's my first build and I'm a little unsure about the cooling options, here's what I have so far:

http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/PublicWishDetail.aspx?WishListNumber=6354709

I won't be doing any overclocking, but I do live in Florida so ambient temps get a tad on the warm side. So, I have three questions that I would really appreciate some advice on! Thanks in advance!

1. The Antec 300 case comes with 2 fans, (1) 120mm fan in the back, and (1) 140mm fan on the top. It has room for 3 more 120mm's - should I get any, all, or none?

2. Will I be OK with the stock heatsink for the E8500? Do I require any additional CPU cooling?

3. Do I need the thermal paste?
 

foolycooly

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Dec 26, 2008
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1. No, you don't need additional fans. The stock cooling should be adequate. You can always add more, but increased airflow is usually only a priority for overclocking and you will produce more noise with more fans.

2. Yes, you will be ok w/ the stock fan if you don't plan on overclocking (intel wouldn't ship it out if it wasn't at least adequate :p) If you still would like to get an aftermarket cooler, you can. It might be a good idea in case you decide to overclock in the future (highly recommended). Your processor is a fantastic overclocker. I would recommend the xigmatek dark knight...not very expensive -

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835233029

Plus if you go w/ stock for now, it can be a huge pain to install a new HSF later...usually involves taking the whole mobo out.

3. You do not need thermal paste if you use the stock cooler. It comes with paste (more like pads) pre-applied to the stock cooler. All you have to do is slap it on (make sure you have it securely attached...the pushpins can be difficult). If you decide to buy an aftermarket HSF, you will need thermal paste. I would recommend MX-2 since it's non-conductive and it performs very well. -

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186020
 

MRFS

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Dec 13, 2008
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http://www.supremelaw.org/systems/heatsinks/warning.htm


> Plus if you go w/ stock for now, it can be a huge pain to install a new HSF later...usually involves taking the whole mobo out.

Cooler Master's latest cases have a window in the motherboard tray,
immediately below the CPU socket, to facilitate HSF upgrades
without removing the motherboard e.g. HAF-932, ATCS 840:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119160&Tpk=HAF-932

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119187


MRFS
 
If you use the stock cooler, ignore the Intel instructions and install the CPU and HSF before you install the motherboard in the case.

Install the RAM at the same time. RAM modules can take a ridiculous amount of pressure to install. You run less chance of damaging the motherboard if it is completely supported.

Because this is your first build, take a look at the prebuilt checklist posted here (I do not have a link, sorry).
 

captainjorge

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Sep 9, 2007
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Excellent! Thanks to all your help, my first build is becoming that much smoother! If you have any other links you recommend for first time builders I'll gladly read them.