Researchers Create Graphene-Like Material

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stingstang

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This is about the 4th new "revolutionary new discovery" that's supposed to change what we know about processors by leaping forward in design and size. It's going to be the same conclusion in the end. It's not cost-effective.
 

alidan

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[citation][nom]stingstang[/nom]This is about the 4th new "revolutionary new discovery" that's supposed to change what we know about processors by leaping forward in design and size. It's going to be the same conclusion in the end. It's not cost-effective.[/citation]

its not really that its not cost effective, its that its in its infancy.

graphene will be used in super computers, high end servers, before it will trickle down to enthusiast builds.

the cost to completely scrap silicon and go with a different route is astronomical, and only someone with the need for the best of the best would be able to fund the switch.
 

lozz08

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the cost to completely scrap silicon and go with a different route is astronomical, and only someone with the need for the best of the best would be able to fund the switch.
Yup. It wouldn't even matter if this new stuff was half the cost. The real cost is changing the entire industry over to new processes. Now, if we could find a new tech that could utilize some of our old si facilities then... That's kind of a pipedream though.
 

back_by_demand

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[citation][nom]a sandwhich[/nom]Doesn't bismuth have the longest half life known?[/citation]
Nope, the longest known half life is currently between Episode 2 and Episode 3 :(
 

alidan

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[citation][nom]lozz08[/nom]Yup. It wouldn't even matter if this new stuff was half the cost. The real cost is changing the entire industry over to new processes. Now, if we could find a new tech that could utilize some of our old si facilities then... That's kind of a pipedream though.[/citation]

im just guessing, but im thinking that the cost would be allong the lines of 10-20 billion for a complete switch, and than YEARS upon YEARS of low yields.

what it would take for a full revamp would be a united effort across all current silicon makers and some government tax breaks / subsidiaries.
 

back_by_demand

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[citation][nom]alidan[/nom]im just guessing, but im thinking that the cost would be allong the lines of 10-20 billion for a complete switch, and than YEARS upon YEARS of low yields. what it would take for a full revamp would be a united effort across all current silicon makers and some government tax breaks / subsidiaries.[/citation]
But think about it, it will be just like the upgrade from copper cable to fibre optic for the phone network, the benfits for reliability and speed with internet is huge. The cost pays for itself eventually you just need deep enough pockets to start the process.
The UK has 75 million miles of copper cables, that's a lot of green.
Also, like the guy above said they won't just flick a switch and the world has to move from silicone overnight costing a few trillion in the process, they will exist side by side with Deep Blue's replacement followed by Googles server farm , followed by Alienware PCs before hitting the crappy consumer PCs sold at Frys. It will be just another componant upgrade by the time it gets to you and me, or more likely, our grandkids.
 

stonedatheist

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[citation][nom]back_by_demand[/nom]Nope, the longest known half life is currently between Episode 2 and Episode 3[/citation]

LMAO! thanks for the chuckle, IMMD. It simply cannot come out soon enough
 

alidan

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[citation][nom]back_by_demand[/nom]But think about it, it will be just like the upgrade from copper cable to fibre optic for the phone network, the benfits for reliability and speed with internet is huge. The cost pays for itself eventually you just need deep enough pockets to start the process.The UK has 75 million miles of copper cables, that's a lot of green.Also, like the guy above said they won't just flick a switch and the world has to move from silicone overnight costing a few trillion in the process, they will exist side by side with Deep Blue's replacement followed by Googles server farm , followed by Alienware PCs before hitting the crappy consumer PCs sold at Frys. It will be just another componant upgrade by the time it gets to you and me, or more likely, our grandkids.[/citation]

no, im looking at it from a more... intel prespective.

a few years back, i had a p4 530 prescot (i believe that was modle number, it was 3.0 or 3.2 ghz hyperthreaded) , and the core 2 used the same socket, however my motherboard couldn't handle a new cpu because of a 90 or 60nm i forget which to a 45nm

with a graphene, i believe they said that even if hey switched now, they would be in the 100+nm range, it would technically be a step backward, but would also be a step forward, because they can handle a 50ghz on air, or was it 250ghz... i forget. thinking of it that way, it may hit cellphones first, because it could arguably preform at desktop levels (ghz wise) with arm wattage.

 
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"Physicists at Helmholtz-Zentrum in Dresden, Germany.." Actually there is just one author from Germany (who is neither first nor last authors) and rest of them are from Korea in the list of the authors of the paper. Please fix this so you give more accurate representations to who the discoverers are.
 

back_by_demand

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[citation][nom]hknano[/nom]"Physicists at Helmholtz-Zentrum in Dresden, Germany.." Actually there is just one author from Germany (who is neither first nor last authors) and rest of them are from Korea in the list of the authors of the paper. Please fix this so you give more accurate representations to who the discoverers are.[/citation]
Give it a few months and Apple will use in in one of their products, then they will have invented it instead
wwwwrrrzzzztttttreality-distortionwwwwwrrrtttzzzzzz
 

rcm

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[citation][nom]back_by_demand[/nom]Give it a few months and Apple will use in in one of their products, then they will have invented it insteadwwwwrrrzzzztttttreality-distortionwwwwwrrrtttzzzzzz[/citation]

Then Apple will file for patent ... LOL
 

mb2bm55

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[citation][nom]hknano[/nom]"Physicists at Helmholtz-Zentrum in Dresden, Germany.." Actually there is just one author from Germany (who is neither first nor last authors) and rest of them are from Korea in the list of the authors of the paper. Please fix this so you give more accurate representations to who the discoverers are.[/citation]

yes but if you dig deeper, Germany was where the work was done. They are from Korea and associated with those institutes but were in Germany for this work. Hence "Researchers at" is the correct statement though an "international korean research team at" might be a little nicer.
 
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