Researchers Dive Into Invisible Light And The Origins Of The Universe

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New Brunswick (NJ) - Physicists at Rutgers University, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the State University of New York at Buffalo have developed a nano-sized electronic circuit, which can detect light invisible to the human eye and today's radio telescopes, opening an opportunity to analyze the greatest portion of the light emitted since the "big bang" and gain insights into the earliest stages of star and galaxy formation almost 14 billion years ago.

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geoffs

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Oct 24, 2007
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"one-tenth of one degree above absolute zero on the Kelvin scale."

That's a bit redundant. Kelvin is always absolute (more accurately, referenced from absolute zero). "one-tenth of one degree Kelvin" or "0.1 Kelvin" is sufficient, everything else is unnecessary.
 

paulxiii

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It might be unnecessary to you, but to most people it makes it much clearer. If you want to split hairs then why did you recommend "one-tenth of one degree Kelvin" when Kelvin doesn't use the degree label? Climb off your little horse.

The article is interesting and I now go off to find more details.

Paul
 

mrmessma

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"The nanobolometer was built using built it using thin-film and nanolithography techniques" -that seems like a bad copy and paste job from another source.
 
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