News Researchers Teleport Data Between Two Chips Via Quantum Entanglement

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Titan
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This measurement utilises the strange behaviour of quantum physics, which simultaneously collapses the entanglement link and transfers the particle state to another particle already on the receiver chip.
Sounds like the instantaneous quantum entanglement transmission is a one-shot thing and you need to restore the chips' entabglement after every use. Sounds like a neat demo but of very limited real-world use. There was a similar demo years ago but that one required light to get sent over fiber between the two entangled atoms... while the receiving atom did change state at the same time as the sending atom, the quantum state couldn't be decoded until the entangled photons used at the transmitter arrived at the receiver.
 
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Isnt it logical then that you could use these chips to comunicate between say a rover on Mars and its command on Earth in real time instead of waiting for 30 minutes for signals to come back to and fro ? Something like Sub Space Transmission on Star Track .

You could send a probe to the nearest star system which would take decades and still comunicate with it in real time . Pretty interesting stuff , I always thought that the speed of light was an unsurmountable obsticle to space travel .
 

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Titan
Moderator
Isnt it logical then that you could use these chips to comunicate between say a rover on Mars and its command on Earth in real time instead of waiting for 30 minutes for signals to come back to and fro ? Something like Sub Space Transmission on Star Track .
Since each entangled link is a one-time-use link, you'd have to send your probe with enough entangled links to send and receive every packet it'll ever need for the duration of its mission. Once all of the entanglements have been collapsed from use, you have to wait however many years it is for a re-supply shipment to reach the probe/rover/whatever before you can have real-time comms again.

Under those conditions, using the quantum link would be something reserved as a last resort after loss of normal comms to verify that the vehicle is still alive and attempt to restore normal comms.
 

jkflipflop98

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The entangled particle isn't destroyed every time. The term "collapsed" here refers to the observation of a quantum state. All other positions of the quantum particle collapse into the result for our universe.
 

spiketheaardvark

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I'm sure it's a long ways off, but this technology could change so much of how we communicate and move data. It's instantaneous, it has no range limit, can't be intercepted, can't be detected, and is impervious to external interference. No more ugly cell towers, while still being able to stream cat videos on the subway. But also the death of china's firewall, or the ability of governments to turn off the internet and phone service. No more undersea cables. Cloud gaming could actually work.
 

smaddeus

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Sounds like the instantaneous quantum entanglement transmission is a one-shot thing and you need to restore the chips' entabglement after every use. Sounds like a neat demo but of very limited real-world use.
No one ever expects from first try to be applicable in real world. It's just a first step. At least we know it's possible and we can improve and modify.
 

w_barath

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Since each entangled link is a one-time-use link, you'd have to send your probe with enough entangled links to send and receive every packet it'll ever need for the duration of its mission. Once all of the entanglements have been collapsed from use, you have to wait however many years it is for a re-supply shipment to reach the probe/rover/whatever before you can have real-time comms again.

Under those conditions, using the quantum link would be something reserved as a last resort after loss of normal comms to verify that the vehicle is still alive and attempt to restore normal comms.
Quantum de-coherence will make those entangled links un-entangled rapidly over time. So you can't ship it with them - you need to send the receiver and transmitter a constant stream of shiney new entangled links and they both need to be within range of a reasonable survival probability of the links to the decay of quantum de-coherence.

For example if the de-coherence is 50% per second then you'd need to send 1024 links to have 50:50 chance that one of them is still valid when arriving at transmitter/receiver pairs at 10s distance at the speed of light... for Reed-Solomon codes to work you need a much lower error rate than that, so you'd need to send hundreds of thousands of entangled pairs to send one byte of data to a receiver 10s away.

So no, this will never be usable for the Mars Rover or anything much beyond planetary communications. At least not without relay stations every 10 light-seconds apart along the delivery route, or some new kind of entangled particle with 100 orders of magnitude lower rate of de-coherence than anything we have access to today. For example if we could entangle neutrinos, they would survive much longer without losing coherence since proximity to charged particles wouldn't affect them as they go on their merry way. The problem is, how do we entangle neutrinos and how to we detect them to the level of accuracy we require?
 
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w_barath

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I'm sure it's a long ways off, but this technology could change so much of how we communicate and move data. It's instantaneous, it has no range limit, can't be intercepted, can't be detected, and is impervious to external interference. No more ugly cell towers, while still being able to stream cat videos on the subway. But also the death of china's firewall, or the ability of governments to turn off the internet and phone service. No more undersea cables. Cloud gaming could actually work.
The range is severely limited by quantum de-coherence. The particles only remain entangled so long as nothing interferes with their state, and it's basically impossible to prevent them from being interfered with as time goes by, so distance is definitely a hurdle since distance is still time at the speed of light.

You can teleport data between 2 chips in relatively close proximity (perhaps even the width of the Earth) but if you want to relay data with Mars you're going to need a relay station every few light-seconds of distance along the transmission path, and there will be some latency in each hop, so it will not be instant. It could still be a significant factor of the speed of light though. ie if you can reliably transmit 10 light-seconds per hop and re-transmission takes 1 picosecond then you can still send messages at 10,000,000,000x the speed of light.
 

bit_user

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It hasn't quite been sorted out to work for us in any tangible manner that can be implemented at a large scale
Two words: Quantum communication.

Entanglement is used to transmit encryption keys, over very large distances. People have even demonstrated doing this using laser beams to send some of the entangled photons to a remote station.
 

bit_user

Splendid
Herald
Anyway, I used to wonder if something like this (or wormholes) would enable computers to scale back up. However, everything I've read suggests that faster-than-light communication remains the stuff of fantasy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faster-than-light#Superluminal_travel_of_non-information


Also, with entanglement being so fragile, I don't expect we'll ever see it being the standard mechanism of data transfer, inside computers.
 

bit_user

Splendid
Herald
Sounds like the instantaneous quantum entanglement transmission is a one-shot thing and you need to restore the chips' entabglement after every use.
The chips aren't entangled - just a pair of particles. As such, you could have a reserve of said particles, perhaps being continuously replenished (for a clue, see the photonics reference, in the article).
 

bit_user

Splendid
Herald
Isnt it logical then that you could use these chips to comunicate between say a rover on Mars and its command on Earth in real time instead of waiting for 30 minutes for signals to come back to and fro ?
I don't claim to understand the physics, but the consensus is: "no"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faster-than-light_communication

You could send a probe to the nearest star system which would take decades and still comunicate with it in real time . Pretty interesting stuff , I always thought that the speed of light was an unsurmountable obsticle to space travel .
It would be cool. But maybe the absence of it is why Earth hasn't long-ago been conquered by some sort of galactic alien empire.
 

bit_user

Splendid
Herald
I'm sure it's a long ways off, but this technology could change so much of how we communicate and move data.
True, but not how you think.

it has no range limit, can't be intercepted, can't be detected, and is impervious to external interference. No more ugly cell towers, while still being able to stream cat videos on the subway.
Because entanglement is very fragile, it'll probably never scale up to replace existing communications methods.

But also the death of china's firewall
China is actually leading, in the quantum communication race. IDK, but they might already have systems deployed for use. They only use entanglement for secure transmission of encryption keys. The rest of the communication is by conventional means.
 

Ino___

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you can not use entanglement to transfer information (data) if you could it would break a lot of physic and it would be all over the news

if A and B are entangled you measure A and its "+"
B will be the opposite "-"
its not like you move A to the left and B also moves magically
you have no influence on either one A nor B you just know that if A has some property B will have the opposite of this property
you can use it for submitting secure message keys because you can know if some one else on the way has spied on it or not if you see there is something of you simply dont use that key

but no super fast communication not to mars not even to the next room
 

bit_user

Splendid
Herald
you can not use entanglement to transfer information (data) if you could it would break a lot of physic and it would be all over the news
Uh, isn't that the point of the article?

From the paper's abstract:
Here, we report the demonstration of chip-to-chip quantum teleportation ...

Wikipedia defines Quantum Teleportation as:
Quantum teleportation is a process in which quantum information (e.g. the exact state of an atom or photon) can be transmitted (exactly, in principle) from one location to another, with the help of classical communication and previously shared quantum entanglement between the sending and receiving location.

It goes on to say:
Because it depends on classical communication, which can proceed no faster than the speed of light, it cannot be used for faster-than-light transport or communication of classical bits.

For more (such as the role of classical communication, in the process): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_teleportation
 

Ino___

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title of the article: (by tomshardware)
Researchers 'Teleport' Data Between Two Chips Via Quantum Entanglement
what does this suggest to you?

in the original article is no mention of data transfer
 

bit_user

Splendid
Herald
title of the article: (by tomshardware)
Researchers 'Teleport' Data Between Two Chips Via Quantum Entanglement
what does this suggest to you?

in the original article is no mention of data transfer
The article reported on the paper that I cited (see the "abstract" link, in the post above), which specifically referenced quantum teleportation.

But, go ahead and keep believing quantum teleportation is not communication, if it makes you happy to think that.

The key things it's not are:
  1. Faster-than-light
  2. A stand-alone communications technique
 
Sounds like the instantaneous quantum entanglement transmission is a one-shot thing and you need to restore the chips' entabglement after every use. Sounds like a neat demo but of very limited real-world use. There was a similar demo years ago but that one required light to get sent over fiber between the two entangled atoms... while the receiving atom did change state at the same time as the sending atom, the quantum state couldn't be decoded until the entangled photons used at the transmitter arrived at the receiver.
Could also be a first step towards a breakthrough. Sometimes it's not about what this does, but what it leads to next.
 

thx1138v2

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Ino___

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  1. the title of the article by tomshardware is simply untrue and click bait i would have never come here if it did not sad "data"
  2. NO the data is not transferred/communicated per entanglement its communicated per some other channel by that mean i can communicate per mind control (i just need an additional Chanel lets say a phone)
  3. Causality and speed of light. It is accepted that the speed of light is the speed of causality.
if you could transfer data whit a higher speed you would break this
could send information back in time
and so on

the first lines of the wiki article are total deceptive you can NOT transmit anything
its simple
you can measure some properties here on A and you will get some RANDOM value over wich you have ABSOLUTELY no influence
B on the other end will have the opposite of this value
usually an up or downward "spin" and some other properties

so one more time you have random gibberish here and you know that you have the opposite random gibberish on the other side but no data transfer
 

bit_user

Splendid
Herald
you can measure some properties here on A and you will get some RANDOM value over wich you have ABSOLUTELY no influence
If this were true, then I agree that it would be pointless.

However, I don't think it's pointless. Nature would not publish any pointless research papers. It's one of the most renowned and venerable of academic journals of the physical sciences.

Therefore, I think you should check your assumptions on the ability of the particle's quantum state to be influenced.

Again, from the abstract:
The generation, processing, transceiving and measurement of multi-photon multi-qubit states are all achieved in micrometre-scale silicon chips, fabricated by the complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor process.

Wow, that sure sounds like they really did make chips that are communicating multi-qubit states.
 
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