Question Reviving MSI R9 280x (VGA BIOS issue?)

ryanfranzese

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Mar 2, 2014
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To keep a long story short, I got this card for cheap on eBay for something to do this weekend, and to try to get my little brother a card that would turn on Battlefield 1 etc. I tried the HDMI, Mini Displayport, and DVI plugs on the card - no luck.
I cleaned the card, reapplied thermal paste, but when plugged in to 2 PCs it just spins the fans and black screen.
  • PC:
  • i5 11600k - tower cooler
  • 16GB DDR4
  • Z590 PRO MSI Mobo
  • 1070 Ti Titanium MSI (normal GPU)
  • 750w 80+ Gold PSU
  • This system is stable and works well.
  • The second PC I mentioned is almost identical.
Using integrated graphics and the R9 280x, I am able to get into Windows using the iGPU, and GPU-Z DOES show the r9 280x as a basic display driver.

GPU-Z
View: https://imgur.com/eAjvZ5B



Anyways, I try some stuff, no luck, now, I tried flashing the bios using ATI Winflash and Bios 1 stopped working - stuck in a boot loop. I switched the dual BIOS switch and repeat the process, thinking I screwed it up. Tried again on the second BIOS, now the PC just boot loops whenever the R9 is plugged in at all. Even when I tell the motherboard to prefer iGPU. My 1070 ti still works just fine.

Any ideas where I can go from here? It's not super critical, but I'd love to see this old card come to life.
 
I knew it was broken when I bought it. Honestly, I was looking for a little project, but not willing to risk my 1070 Ti w/ anything right now, as I'm not spending $500 to replace a card I paid $300 for 3 years ago.
Oh gotcha. In that case I wouldn't assume its a bios issue I would assume its a connection/trace issue. Follow a guide and toast it in a oven, I have had good results from doing that in the past.
 

ryanfranzese

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Mar 2, 2014
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Oh gotcha. In that case I wouldn't assume its a bios issue I would assume its a connection/trace issue. Follow a guide and toast it in a oven, I have had good results from doing that in the past.
You know I have seen that done before, and happen to have a spare toaster oven that is about to be trashed. I looked over connections and all the bits on both sides of the PCBs very closely, and didn't see anything wrong. Is that something I wouldn't be able to see?

Also, I forgot to mention, the card was sticky in some places, like the guy had spilled something on it... I used rubbing alcohol, cotton, and an air compressor to de-stickify the card. Could that cause some sort of short, if so, wouldn't that short be permanent damage?
 
You know I have seen that done before, and happen to have a spare toaster oven that is about to be trashed. I looked over connections and all the bits on both sides of the PCBs very closely, and didn't see anything wrong. Is that something I wouldn't be able to see?

Also, I forgot to mention, the card was sticky in some places, like the guy had spilled something on it... I used rubbing alcohol, cotton, and an air compressor to de-stickify the card. Could that cause some sort of short, if so, wouldn't that short be permanent damage?
Anything is possible, Most of the cards that I have done this to did not show any physical signs of damage it was a issue below the die where it is soldered.
 

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