Question RTX. 2060 Super FE 6-pin problem

imrazor

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I was browsing graphics cards at a local retailer and almost bought a 2060 Super FE. However, I noted that the card required a single 8-pin connector, whereas I know that my Dell PSU has 2x6-pin connectors. So the PSU should be able to deliver enough power, but lacks the correct connector. The sales associate did some research and determined that the 2060 Super did NOT come with a 2x6-pin to 8-pin adapter, nor did the store have any in stock.

Is the associate right? Does the 2060 Super FE not come with a dual 6-pin to 8-pin adapter? That seems kind of short sighted. Or is it that unusual for a PSU to not have an 8-pin connector?

I'm currently digging through my old cables to see if I have an adapter, but no luck so far...
 

Darkbreeze

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If your graphics card requires an 8 pin connection then you NEED a power supply with an 8 pin connector. If a PSU does not have an 8 pin or a 6+2 pin, then it is NOT suitable for use with a graphics card that requires one. There is a REASON why some units HAVE one or more 8 pin or 6+2 pin connections and some don't.

Using adapters for 6 pin to 8 pin PCI is ALWAYS a BAD IDEA.

I don't know how many threads we have here where people have used them and burned up their PSU, graphics card or motherboard, but I CAN tell you that it is more than ten, this year alone. That "I" know of. I advise against using them, ever.

Get a suitable power supply.

 

imrazor

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If your graphics card requires an 8 pin connection then you NEED a power supply with an 8 pin connector. If a PSU does not have an 8 pin or a 6+2 pin, then it is NOT suitable for use with a graphics card that requires one. There is a REASON why some units HAVE one or more 8 pin or 6+2 pin connections and some don't.

Using adapters for 6 pin to 8 pin PCI is ALWAYS a BAD IDEA.

I don't know how many threads we have here where people have used them and burned up their PSU, graphics card or motherboard, but I CAN tell you that it is more than ten, this year alone. That "I" know of. I advise against using them, ever.

Get a suitable power supply.
It's a proprietary 875w PSU, so replacing it is not an option.

Aside from that, I'm confused why a y-cable to join 2x6-pin connectors (75w x 2) to a single 8 pin connector (150w) is a problem. Yes, I can see how taking a single 6-pin connector that only provides 75w and plugging it into an 8-pin connector that could draw way more power could be an issue. But what I'm talking about is merging two 75w power sources into one 150w connector. That shouldn't overload or melt anything.
 

Zizo007

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It's a proprietary 875w PSU, so replacing it is not an option.

Aside from that, I'm confused why a y-cable to join 2x6-pin connectors (75w x 2) to a single 8 pin connector (150w) is a problem. Yes, I can see how taking a single 6-pin connector that only provides 75w and plugging it into an 8-pin connector that could draw way more power could be an issue. But what I'm talking about is merging two 75w power sources into one 150w connector. That shouldn't overload or melt anything.
Whats the 12V wattage and amps of the Dell PSU?
 

Darkbreeze

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It's a proprietary 875w PSU, so replacing it is not an option.

And THAT fully outlines the problem with trying to use a high end graphics card in a prebuilt OEM system. This is not new or unique, and the fact that you have this problem does not change the basic fact of the matter, which is that if Dell or the OEM that built that PSU felt it was capable of handling the load of an 8 pin circuit, internally, then it would have come with 8 pin or 6+2 pin connections by design.

You certainly CAN use a 2x6 pin to 8 pin adapter, but it is 100% asking for trouble. Nobody ever believes that, until the smoke, and the tears, begin.
 

imrazor

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Your vehemence on the subject prompted me to do more research. I found Nvidia's official position on the use of 6-to-8 pin adapters here:

https://nvidia.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/2198

Apparently using a dual 6-pin to 8-pin adapter is absolutely forbidden. However, they do endorse the use of a single 6-pin to single 8-pin adapter provided that you can ensure that the 12v rail can deliver 150 watts. My PSU has five 12v rails rated at 18 amps each, or 216 watts per rail. According to Nvidia, a single 6-pin to 8-pin adapter should work since all the rails have sufficient wattage.

That a dual 6-pin adapter would be a safety hazard whereas a single 6-pin would be safe baffles me. But I figure if anyone knows how to power a 2060 Super FE, it's going to be Nvidia.
 

Darkbreeze

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Nivida can say whatever they like. I still wouldn't do it. They don't CARE if you burn up your PSU or graphics card because THEY would not be replacing it, nor would the manufacturer of your card, under any condition where adapters were used anyhow. They would love to sell you new hardware when your current hardware no longer works, IF that were to occur.

There are no six pin connectors that can, by design, and by the confines of the standard, supply what is needed for an 8 pin cable. Furthermore, if they COULD, the manufacturer would have MADE them a 6+2 or 8 pin connector to begin with. No manufacturer would intentionally NOT make a cable capable of being used with 8 pin sockets if they felt it was able to adequately do so. Ever. IF you don't see it, they didn't.

Obviously, this is not just "my opinion".




 
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popatim

Titan
Moderator
The issues with adapters in typically due to being made with the cheapest /poor quality components

Example: https://graphicscardhub.com/graphics-card-pcie-power-connectors/ In this Sata to 8-pin adapter

You have only TWO 12V wires to replace what would normally be 3. If they choose the wrong gauge wire you could be looking at a fire when the wire gets to hot, melts, and bursts into flames if no one is around to notice the smell and shut it down.

We've had several here at work over the years with molex to sata power adapters feeding HDD or optical drives, and those barely draw 10w at most.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
My biggest issue is NOT with the low quality of the adapters, although that IS definitely a consideration in many cases as well. My primary issue is that a power supply that does not come WITH an 8 pin connector is generally not capable of sustaining the capacity necessary to support the load of an 8 pin connection, otherwise it would have come with one. Manufacturers don't decide to leave off an 8 pin connection simply to save money on the cable or plastic or because they just don't feel like including one. It's usually because they know the unit can't safely support it.
 

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