[SOLVED] RTX 2060 SUPER Optimal Overclocks

Jul 26, 2019
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Hello Toms Hardware Community,

Looking for a few tips on what a few of you would believe to be optimal overclocks for my Asus RTX 2060 SUPER 8G card. I've used the tool but the tools suggestions were surprisingly minor. (Used GPU tweak 2)

My system goes as follows:
i7 9700K
16 GB of RAM
Asus RTX 2060 SUPER Overclock 8G EVO (duel fan)
1000 W Seasonic GOLD + power supply
DARKROCK PRO 4 cooler
NZXT h700 case (total of 5 fans)

My computer is pretty well set for overclocking, no games im looking in particular to push that much harder (only can do 1080P thanks for my monitor, working on that upgrade) just curious what you experts feel something like this SHOULD be able to push without issues of artifacting or instability.
 
Well, in this case using the tool (OC Scanner) is actually a good choice.

The issue with a lot of those SC/SSC factory OC'ed cards, is that they are already pretty much maxed on their boost. So you won't actually get much more out of them, even if you did do a manual OC.

To answer your question, no one can give you 'optimal' clocks. Each chip is different, and what you get on one, may not translate to another. You should follow a simple guide like this:
View: https://youtu.be/k1dGwFOdFLI


Follow the instructions closely. It will take all of about an hour to OC the card manually, and you can compare to the OC Scanner results to see how far you can push it manually.
 
Well, in this case using the tool (OC Scanner) is actually a good choice.

The issue with a lot of those SC/SSC factory OC'ed cards, is that they are already pretty much maxed on their boost. So you won't actually get much more out of them, even if you did do a manual OC.

To answer your question, no one can give you 'optimal' clocks. Each chip is different, and what you get on one, may not translate to another. You should follow a simple guide like this:
View: https://youtu.be/k1dGwFOdFLI


Follow the instructions closely. It will take all of about an hour to OC the card manually, and you can compare to the OC Scanner results to see how far you can push it manually.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
The 20xx cards don't tend to have a lot of room on the core, and that's all most (all?) of the OC "tools" will touch.

There's no "one-size" though - each card is different in what it can achieve.

Your biggest gains will come from the memory - and what you can typically achieve there will depend on the memory supplier (Micron, Samsung).

Either way, +400 to +500 on the memory should be achievable in most cases. With Samsung, you might be able to push +750 or more.
 
Jul 26, 2019
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Thanks for all the help everyone. This should give me some solid insight to tinker around with. Its become a slight (ok more than slight) addiction sqeeuzing every ounce of my potential out of my system
 
Reactions: keith12
Your biggest gains will come from the memory - and what you can typically achieve there will depend on the memory supplier (Micron, Samsung)
I'm not sure about this statement. In terms of overclocking the hardware for this card, in this case the best results will come from the memory (that part I agree with) for newer SC/SSC, because as we've said the cores a pretty maxed already. But in terms of a performance boost FPS wise (and in general terms), isn't it the core clock speeds, that will have more of an affect on FPS?

I may be misreading your post.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
isn't it the core clock speeds, that will have more of an affect on FPS?
I may be misreading your post.
You are, and you're not at the same time.

To elaborate, the clock speed increase (generally) will be what results in greater FPS figures and, in tandem with memory clock increases will net your absolute best results.
BUT, with modern boost settings, you're not likely to achieve substantially better manually on the core than you would with a power target slider max out, and appropriate cooling, of course.

Those same boost parameters do not touch the memory though. So, if you were to only manually tune one element (+power slider), it's the memory that'll see you net you the better gains vs. strictly OCing the core, IMO.

A "stock" core boost should see a 2060S hit >1900MHz (+/-) under the right power/temp circumstances - and you're not going to see particularly noteworthy gains via manually overclocking the core. You might be able to get to ~2000MHz stable.

On the memory front though, you're starting at an effective 7000MHz.
On most cards, you should hit at least 7500MHz, and potentially up to 8000MHz (I've seen reports of 8100MHz too).
While in a vacuum, the memory jump isn't going to net you substantial FPS gains alone, in tandem with the boost algorithm, it is.

Of course, manually tuning both the core & the memory will net you the absolute best performance.
 
You are, and you're not at the same time.

To elaborate, the clock speed increase (generally) will be what results in greater FPS figures and, in tandem with memory clock increases will net your absolute best results.
BUT, with modern boost settings, you're not likely to achieve substantially better manually on the core than you would with a power target slider max out, and appropriate cooling, of course.

Those same boost parameters do not touch the memory though. So, if you were to only manually tune one element (+power slider), it's the memory that'll see you net you the better gains vs. strictly OCing the core, IMO.

A "stock" core boost should see a 2060S hit >1900MHz (+/-) under the right power/temp circumstances - and you're not going to see particularly noteworthy gains via manually overclocking the core. You might be able to get to ~2000MHz stable.

On the memory front though, you're starting at an effective 7000MHz.
On most cards, you should hit at least 7500MHz, and potentially up to 8000MHz (I've seen reports of 8100MHz too).
While in a vacuum, the memory jump isn't going to net you substantial FPS gains alone, in tandem with the boost algorithm, it is.

Of course, manually tuning both the core & the memory will net you the absolute best performance.
Thanks for the clarification :) That has helped, and I'm sure for the OP too.
 
Jul 26, 2019
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13
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Yeah all these posts have helped out a lot. Its also uplifting knowing companies are indeed trying to push their OC cards to the actual limits of said cards. (at least in some cases) Versus the old days were you did have a lot of head room. In some cases selling cards (at higher prices) that start at that higher clock speed. Which in some cases were just pushing the same hardware with the higher clock setting.
 

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