[SOLVED] Rtx 2060 super's ray tracing capabilitys

Apr 19, 2020
17
0
10
0
So I've been looking at the 2060 super for a while, and it seems to pretty much fit all my needs. However, I'd like to know how well the ray tracing works at 1080p and I'd also be curious to hear any guess on how this card's ray tracing will be able to preform on upcoming titles. I know that you won't truly know how well a card will preform on a game until you try it, but I'm still curious

My build:
R5 3600
2060 super
8gb*2 3000mhz
B450m Steel Legend
Evga 600 B1, 80+ Bronze 600w
Thermaltake H17
 

RTX 2080

Upstanding
Jun 8, 2020
439
91
340
19
It really depends on:

a) Which / how many ray tracing elements are being implemented (Shadows/Reflections/Global Illumination)
b) What quality these ray tracing elements are being rendered at (Medium, High, Ultra)
c) The settings you are using for the non ray-traced graphical elements
d) Whether or not the titles you play support DLSS 2.0 or not.

Keep in mind that the RTX 2000 series of GPUs are a first generation ray tracing effort and as a result will come with compromises that will be fixed or improved upon in later generations of cards (such as the upcoming Nvidia Ampere GPUs).

Now for a breakdown of the above:

a) Ray-traced shadows and reflections are computationally expensive, global illumination is even more so. Even one of these will drop frame rates significantly, two or more (like both reflections and shadows in the game "Control") will tank performance even further.

b) Having even a lower-quality implementation of ray tracing (medium instead of ultra) can provide visual accuracy/improvements, but it'll make it biggest visual (and performance) impact at higher settings.

c) Point B assumes that you have headroom to enable ray tracing at all. Sometimes enabling ray tracing may cause enough of a performance hit that in order to achieve your frame rate goals, you have to decrease enough non ray-tracing settings that the overall image you see on the screen is worse.

Example: I play Shadow of the Tomb Raider with my RTX 2080 at 4K with all settings at Ultra except ray tracing which is off and Anti-Aliasing which is set to TAA. The only way for me to enable ray tracing (shadows in this case) at Ultra would be to either accept playing at 30 fps, change a bunch of other settings down to medium, reduce my resolution, or enable DLSS (the original version, which doesn't work well). In my case, the ray traced shadows don't make enough of a visual improvement to justify the visual hit of doing any of these, so I leave it off.

d) DLSS 2.0 (the much improved version that is worth using) is a game changer and allows you to offset the computational cost of ray tracing significantly, making it viable to turn on in situations where you normally couldn't without horrible frame rates. For me, the ray-traced games that I can play the way I want on my current hardware are DLSS 2.0 games and the ones I can't have either DLSS 1.0 or none at all.

Example: Metro Exodus uses Global Illumination, the single most taxing form of ray tracing. The best way I found to play it on my hardware is at 1080p with all the settings maxed out (including ray tracing) without DLSS enabled. I got an average frame rate of 80 fps with dips below 60 fps using my RTX 2080. The hardware to drive this game with everything turned up at 4K 60 fps doesn't exist yet.

Point is, there are four main things that I'm guessing you want here: 1080p resolution, high-quality visuals, good fps (minimum of 60), & ray tracing. If the game you want to play doesn't have DLSS 2.0, you'll be able to achieve two or three of these at the same time, but never all four. I can achieve all four, but that because of my 2080.

The RTX 2060 Super is a very fine card, but its limitations mean that it'll more often be about dipping your toe into the world of ray-tracing rather than being able to fully embrace it. For that, you'll have to either spend more money on a more expensive GPU or wait for next generation hardware.
 
Reactions: Massiveredboi

RTX 2080

Upstanding
Jun 8, 2020
439
91
340
19
It really depends on:

a) Which / how many ray tracing elements are being implemented (Shadows/Reflections/Global Illumination)
b) What quality these ray tracing elements are being rendered at (Medium, High, Ultra)
c) The settings you are using for the non ray-traced graphical elements
d) Whether or not the titles you play support DLSS 2.0 or not.

Keep in mind that the RTX 2000 series of GPUs are a first generation ray tracing effort and as a result will come with compromises that will be fixed or improved upon in later generations of cards (such as the upcoming Nvidia Ampere GPUs).

Now for a breakdown of the above:

a) Ray-traced shadows and reflections are computationally expensive, global illumination is even more so. Even one of these will drop frame rates significantly, two or more (like both reflections and shadows in the game "Control") will tank performance even further.

b) Having even a lower-quality implementation of ray tracing (medium instead of ultra) can provide visual accuracy/improvements, but it'll make it biggest visual (and performance) impact at higher settings.

c) Point B assumes that you have headroom to enable ray tracing at all. Sometimes enabling ray tracing may cause enough of a performance hit that in order to achieve your frame rate goals, you have to decrease enough non ray-tracing settings that the overall image you see on the screen is worse.

Example: I play Shadow of the Tomb Raider with my RTX 2080 at 4K with all settings at Ultra except ray tracing which is off and Anti-Aliasing which is set to TAA. The only way for me to enable ray tracing (shadows in this case) at Ultra would be to either accept playing at 30 fps, change a bunch of other settings down to medium, reduce my resolution, or enable DLSS (the original version, which doesn't work well). In my case, the ray traced shadows don't make enough of a visual improvement to justify the visual hit of doing any of these, so I leave it off.

d) DLSS 2.0 (the much improved version that is worth using) is a game changer and allows you to offset the computational cost of ray tracing significantly, making it viable to turn on in situations where you normally couldn't without horrible frame rates. For me, the ray-traced games that I can play the way I want on my current hardware are DLSS 2.0 games and the ones I can't have either DLSS 1.0 or none at all.

Example: Metro Exodus uses Global Illumination, the single most taxing form of ray tracing. The best way I found to play it on my hardware is at 1080p with all the settings maxed out (including ray tracing) without DLSS enabled. I got an average frame rate of 80 fps with dips below 60 fps using my RTX 2080. The hardware to drive this game with everything turned up at 4K 60 fps doesn't exist yet.

Point is, there are four main things that I'm guessing you want here: 1080p resolution, high-quality visuals, good fps (minimum of 60), & ray tracing. If the game you want to play doesn't have DLSS 2.0, you'll be able to achieve two or three of these at the same time, but never all four. I can achieve all four, but that because of my 2080.

The RTX 2060 Super is a very fine card, but its limitations mean that it'll more often be about dipping your toe into the world of ray-tracing rather than being able to fully embrace it. For that, you'll have to either spend more money on a more expensive GPU or wait for next generation hardware.
 
Reactions: Massiveredboi
Apr 19, 2020
17
0
10
0
Lol, happy to help!

There's a lot of information out there, its satisfying to be able to condense it in a way that helps someone make an informed purchase.

You going to get the 2060 super?
Probably, but I'm going to wait till the 3000 series comes and the 2060 super's prices lower. Maybe I'll even get a 3000 series card but I doubt it considering the likely shortages of stock and price gouging.
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS