Question RTX 2080Ti

Sep 18, 2021
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Hey guys! I recently bought a pre build pc with Ryzen 7 3700x and Gigabytes RTX 2080Ti. I just don't understand why my GPU temp stay the same around 80 degree with different quality setting (Low, medium, high and ultra). I mostly play racing games such as F1 2020 and Forza. Even with low setting, i'm still getting 80 degree. I play with 1080p monitor. May i know why is that? Thanks
 
I’d expect the gpu is still being utilised to it maximum or close to it maximum. When you lower the detail settings are the FPS increasing? Is the gpu usage staying about the same but you get more FPS at lower settings.

80c is not bad for a 2080Ti. If you want to try and reduce the temperature you can look at undervolting or you could you an FPS limiter if you are getting more FPS than you need. However 80c is fine.

What fans does the case have? What case is it?
 
Sep 18, 2021
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I’d expect the gpu is still being utilised to it maximum or close to it maximum. When you lower the detail settings are the FPS increasing? Is the gpu usage staying about the same but you get more FPS at lower settings.

80c is not bad for a 2080Ti. If you want to try and reduce the temperature you can look at undervolting or you could you an FPS limiter if you are getting more FPS than you need. However 80c is fine.

What fans does the case have? What case is it?
Yes, lowering the quality increase the FPS. As for the GPU Utilization, playing F1 2020 at high setting is around 45-50%. I have Lian Li Lancool 2 Mesh with 5 intakes and 3 exhaust.
 
Can you give you system specs, as well as your graphics card model?

if you live in a hot environment, with a case that doesn't have lots of airflow, and or you have an RTX 2080 Ti that's a blower or a very cheap option, 80-85C is mostly normal.

These aren't optimal temps of course, but I wouldn't worry to much about it. Turing's official max temp is 88C, so you still have some temperature headroom to spare.

The only real problem with 85C temps is that you won't be running GPU Boost at all, you'll be stuck at your base clock, resulting in 5 sometimes 10% less performance. But its still in spec, which is really all you need to worry about.

If you plan to keep your GPU for more than 5 years, I would find a way to reduce temperatures, if not you can keep your GPU running that way if you want.

Also I wouldn't advise doing any overclocking with those temps aswell.

The reason why 85C is fine is that voltage + amperage at high temperatures kills. But, When Nvidia GPUs run at those "super" high temperatures, the actual voltage levels are significantly lower than that of say 65-75C temps.

The only real danger with the high temps is if your VRMs and or VRAM is not adequately cooled, in this case the high temps could also degrade these components. However, this is really a problem with the graphics card, and not you. If your card is rated by reviewers as an excellent card that cools everything well, you have nothing to worry about.
 
Sep 18, 2021
7
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Can you give you system specs, as well as your graphics card model?

if you live in a hot environment, with a case that doesn't have lots of airflow, and or you have an RTX 2080 Ti that's a blower or a very cheap option, 80-85C is mostly normal.

These aren't optimal temps of course, but I wouldn't worry to much about it. Turing's official max temp is 88C, so you still have some temperature headroom to spare.

The only real problem with 85C temps is that you won't be running GPU Boost at all, you'll be stuck at your base clock, resulting in 5 sometimes 10% less performance. But its still in spec, which is really all you need to worry about.

If you plan to keep your GPU for more than 5 years, I would find a way to reduce temperatures, if not you can keep your GPU running that way if you want.

Also I wouldn't advise doing any overclocking with those temps aswell.

The reason why 85C is fine is that voltage + amperage at high temperatures kills. But, When Nvidia GPUs run at those "super" high temperatures, the actual voltage levels are significantly lower than that of say 65-75C temps.

The only real danger with the high temps is if your VRMs and or VRAM is not adequately cooled, in this case the high temps could also degrade these components. However, this is really a problem with the graphics card, and not you. If your card is rated by reviewers as an excellent card that cools everything well, you have nothing to worry about.
Yes, i live in a country that is very humid and i have arguably the best airflow case, the Lian Li Lancool 2 Mesh with 5 Intakes and 3 exhaust. I got Gigabytes RTX 2080 Ti OC 11G. I'm planning to try repasting the GPU but i'm not really confident doing it and with the current market rn, not sure if i want to risk it.
 

Mariusglock

Prominent
Jun 13, 2020
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Hey there, I would suggest setting your gpu fan speed manually, before messing around with the voltage. Also it wouldnt hurt to check how the thermal pads, and thermal paste are doing (if thats a second hand build that you bought).
My GPU when idle would reach up to 60C and 80+ when gaming.
But since i've set the fan speed to 35% at idle it stays at a cool 40C, and 65% speed when gaming it stays at 60C.
 
Sep 18, 2021
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Hey there, I would suggest setting your gpu fan speed manually, before messing around with the voltage. Also it wouldnt hurt to check how the thermal pads, and thermal paste are doing (if thats a second hand build that you bought).
My GPU when idle would reach up to 60C and 80+ when gaming.
But since i've set the fan speed to 35% at idle it stays at a cool 40C, and 65% speed when gaming it stays at 60C.
My idle temp is around 40 degree and the fans will spin when the temp reach 50 degree.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
Yes, i might go with either the thermal grizzly or the noctua thermal paste.
No to Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut.
-It burns out faster under elevated temperatures around 80C, which will prompt more frequent repastes if you fail to get thermals down.
-It's already expensive(per gram).
-The viscosity isn't very high for this stuff; high viscosity is better for gpu bare die applications, to resist getting pushed off the die from cooler mounting pressure and during thermal cycles.
Kryonaut has its place, but this isn't one of them.

Noctua NT-H2 is good. NT-H1, not so much.
There's also Cooler Master Mastergel Maker Nano, Prolimatech PK-3, and Kingpin KPx.
 
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