Question RTX 3070 NO SIGNAL ERROR

Sep 7, 2021
4
0
10
0
I just bought myself a Zotac RTX 3070 (Was lucky enough to manage to get one). Upgraded from an old MSI GTX 970. For some reason, after installing the graphics card I get absolutely no signal. I'm using an HDMI 2.0 cable (a really good high-speed one), but nothing.

FYI, my PSU has one 6 pin connector and one 8 pin connector, but the GPU turns on fine using the included 6 to 8 pin adaptor in the box (it's very ugly though).

I tried:
-Unplugging and plugging everything back in (waiting 1-2 minutes each time).
-Connecting the HDMI to a display port adaptor to the GPU with both my monitors.
-CMOS Reset (removed the motherboard's battery for 2 minutes).
-Forcing PCI-E 3.0 (due to these cards defaulting to 4.0, or so I've read) in the BIOS but couldn't find the option in advanced settings, at least with my mobo.

So far, no luck. I've read that it might be due to the GPUs taking full advantage of display-port cables and HDMI 2.1 cables, but I'm pretty sure I should be able to use a 2.0 HDMI cable without issues.


Specs:
CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600
GPU: Zotac TwindEdge OC RTX 3070
Motherboard: Asus Prime b450-m a
Ram: x2 Adata DDR4 8GB 3200 MHz XPG Hunter
PSU: NZXT 750W (it's a bit old, from like 2012 and it's semi-modular, but never had an issue with it tbh)

I'm absolutely desperate as I need my pc to work, any help would be much appriciated.
 
Sep 7, 2021
4
0
10
0
Two things.
I wouldn't use a 6-8pin adapter.
....and depending on the model I see there are some pretty subpar NZXT units.
I would try a quality PSU designed to operate with 2-8 pin plugs.
Thanks for the reply! But the strange thing is that if it's the PSU it works just fine with the GTX 970
 
PSU: NZXT 750W (it's a bit old, from like 2012 and it's semi-modular, but never had an issue with it tbh)
That right there is the fault in your logic. That does not make it a good or reliable or quality PSU, it just makes it a working one. The PSU almost never shows signs before it fails, it just does. If you also consider that it's a old one that possibly lacks some of the new protections and may also be based in an older platform you got an issue either way.

3000 series from Nvidia are notorious for their huge power spikes and they do trip some protections of some very good and far newer PSUs out there.
 
Sep 7, 2021
4
0
10
0
That right there is the fault in your logic. That does not make it a good or reliable or quality PSU, it just makes it a working one. The PSU almost never shows signs before it fails, it just does. If you also consider that it's a old one that possibly lacks some of the new protections and may also be based in an older platform you got an issue either way.

3000 series from Nvidia are notorious for their huge power spikes and they do trip some protections of some very good and far newer PSUs out there.
I just don't understand why though. Switching back to my 970 everything seems to work flawlessly. Sure, I could buy a new PSU and see if it's that, but if not, I would spend a 100 or so bucks to no avail.
 
Yeah a 9 years old PSU using an adapter is not recommended. You're lucky that PSU didn't blow up yet.

This is not a 10 years old warranty PSU like a seasonic or corsair gold series or better.

Even if it's not the PSU it's good to replace it before it just go poufff and bring half your system with it. 9 years old is pushing it really.
 
Reactions: dotas1
I just don't understand why though. Switching back to my 970 everything seems to work flawlessly. Sure, I could buy a new PSU and see if it's that, but if not, I would spend a 100 or so bucks to no avail.
You are thinking it wrong. You will not be spending 100 or so bucks to no avail. You will be spending 100 or so bucks to ensure that your system stays safe and does not blow up in a fiery way.
A PSU is the last thing you want to cheap out on. A good rule of thumb is to spend 10ish% of the TOTAL cost of your system.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS