Question RTX 4090 for 1080p 120FPS gaming ?

IDProG

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Assume that the 4090 gets undervolted.

Assume that 120 FPS frame limit is always activated on every game played.

How many years do you think it will require until the 4090 can no longer play games at 1080p Ultra with/without RT at 120 FPS?

Is 10 years possible?
 
10 years? My guess is no, just look back 6-7 years and see how the GTX 1080/1080Ti performs today. The other thing to consider is what new features will be around in 5 years that an older card wouldn’t support, for example we have Ray Tracing hardware support in newer NVIDIA cards that the 1080 doesn’t have.
 
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Zerk2012

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Assume that the 4090 gets undervolted.

Assume that 120 FPS frame limit is always activated on every game played.

How many years do you think it will require until the 4090 can no longer play games at 1080p Ultra with/without RT at 120 FPS?

Is 10 years possible?
10 Years ago you would of bought a 780 and be disappointed today actually about 5 years in.

10 years from now your CPU probably wont be able to produce 120FPS.

Nothing wrong with buying some overkill on the video card buy you a nice 4070ti for half the money then win it no longer performs the way you wish buy you a new card again.

I still have a 4790K paired with a 1070 that I use for 1440p iracing sim but it's not that demanding so no need to buy new stuff just for it. I have another PC for the harder stuff.
 
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PEnns

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In X years (pick a number less than 10), one of the 3 companies that make those GPUs might (and very likely will) introduce a new gimmick, I mean, technology. This new baby won't be even reasonably playable / useable, no matter how powerful or expensive current GPUs are.

It's called the GeePeeYew law.
 

DSzymborski

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I will second what MrN1ce9uy said. You could buy an $800 GPU now, likely stay over 120 FPS at 1080p for five years and then in five years, the other $800 would buy a GPU better than an RTX 4090. The 4070 Ti is faster than the best gaming GPU of five years ago, the RTX 2080 Ti.

And not only do you get more efficient GPUs for your use and a better one in the back-end of the years, you also get more warranty coverage (six years for the two GPUs instead of three years for just one) and access to the specific technologies that are implemented in the next five years that may improve the experience. Not to mention that the 4090 is more likely to be dead in years nine and ten than either of these GPUs in years four and five.

Buying the most expensive GPU to keep it for a decade makes *zero* sense. It's a worst of both worlds scenario: you're paying a lot of money to get great performance now that you can't use and average performance later that you can get far more cheaply then. It's the equivalent of ordering a cheeseburger now that you intend to eat in three weeks.

Buy the GPU you need now, not the GPU you need in five years. There's no financial or performance benefit to doing it this way.
 
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Deleted member 2838871

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If there were a GPU available now for gaming that I would try to use for 10 years, it would be the RTX 4090. (As ridiculous as the price is..) However, you could buy a new 60 series card every 2-3 years and still not spend that much in 10 years. With every new generation you would get the new technology.
Well... it is an absolute monster of a card. I mean... my 7950x3D/4090 benchmarks in some of the 3DMark tests show an 80% increase over my previous 10900k/3090 tests from 2 years ago.

80%.

Still... I don't think I'll get 10 years out of it for 4K Ultra gaming... some of the Unreal Engine 5 tests I've ran really push it to its limits and that thing called RT Overdrive in CP2077 is the only thing that has brought my PC to its knees.

1080p 120fps in 10 years? Probably. But I didn't buy it for that. I'm hoping for a solid 5 years out of this system though. After all I did get 4 1/2 years out of a 7700k/1080 Ti system built in 2017.

And not only do you get more efficient GPUs for your use and a better one in the back-end of the years, you also get more warranty coverage (six years for the two GPUs instead of three years for just one)

Gigabyte gave me an extra year for registering the card... so I have 4 years. Not too shabby.

Buying the most expensive GPU to keep it for a decade makes *zero* sense.

Buy the GPU you need now, not the GPU you need in five years. There's no financial or performance benefit to doing it this way.

Yep... and I needed it now because the 4090 is pretty much the only card for a reliable 60 fps in 4K Ultra settings on the latest AAA titles.

Pricey... but not much choice in the matter. Not gonna get the same performance out of a lesser 12GB card. 24GB is my new bare minimum. Games like Last of Us are pulling 14GB VRAM.
 
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Deleted member 2838871

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That's where I'm leaning. A few years ago, I was all for more power. Now, cards are sputtering to death after just 3-4 years (and they cost twice as much.)

Probably why Gigabyte gave me a 4 year warranty with my 4090. $1700 for 4 years is only $425 a year. I'll take that every day of the week and twice on Sunday for the performance the 4090 brings.
 
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Deleted member 2838871

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4 years isn't too bad considering 2 and 3 years is the average... I miss the 10 year extended warranty offered by EVGA. I miss EVGA...
Yeah it's a shame they're gone. I would have went with them for the 4090 if they were still around. I still went with them for the PSU though.