Ruckus Wireless Unveils 'Industry's First' 802.11ac Wave 2 Access Point

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laststop311

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Shame that wireless is starting to outpace 1gbps wired connections. Intel needs to get on the ball and integrate 10gbit wired ethernet instead of 1 gbit. Wired connections should offer more speed than wireless. So the extra money for 10gbit wired ethernet needs to be spent to keep things in line with the way they should be.
 

zodiacfml

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Wired is Full Duplex, send and receive at the same time while Wi-Fi is half duplex.
I have seen a review of one notebook with dual stream AC, reaching 500 mbps which is only half of 1gbps where the wired is around 85 to 90% of the speed.

10gbps requires fiber or a thick and stiff LAN cable. It's also several times more expensive than 1 gbps which is why this Ruckus AP has two 1 gbps LAN ports instead.
 

zodiacfml

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Wired is Full Duplex, send and receive at the same time while Wi-Fi is half duplex.
I have seen a review of one notebook with dual stream AC, reaching 500 mbps which is only half of 1gbps where the wired is around 85 to 90% of the speed.

10gbps requires fiber or a thick and stiff LAN cable. It's also several times more expensive than 1 gbps which is why this Ruckus AP has two 1 gbps LAN ports instead.
 
1Gbps = 125MBps

A BluRay movie uses under 5MBps (24FPS) so at 60FPS the same quality requires just over 10MBps.

Where's the need for 10Gbps? That's basically 100X faster than BluRay quality at 60FPS!

Also, don't forget that wi-fi rarely performs like the specs would suggest, and LATENCY is much higher on wi-fi which is a factor for gamers.

Ethernet is still king if you can run the wires.
 

WISE_guy

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There are actually available switches from Cisco, providing 2,5 and 5 GB/s Ethernet speeds, but they are exactly result of marketing bullshit about 802.11ac -- in real life you don't need even second 1Gb/s port on AP, as traffic is never reaching 1Gb/s limit.
Ethernet is much faster and better than Wi-Fi at similar rates, as it is switched and full-duplex, and have about zero packet error rate.
If you have 100 users on 802.11ac AP, they all share same half-duplex bandwidth (which is much less than marketed "multigigabit" (866Mb/s or 1333 MB/s) in real life, and are contenting for media access. So you get average 5-10 MB/s per client if all users really use network, and even not full-duplex...
On 1GB/s Ethernet switch 100 users would have total full duplex 100x 1gb/s bandwidth without any contention, which is about 1000 times more.
So wehn you are saying that Wi-Fi is faster than Ethernet this is exactly what you compare. Doesn't look as good as just marketing pitch...
Marketing persons doesn't say this because they don't know or just don't care about facts - they are just selling.
It isn't a big problem to make 2,5Gb/s or 5 GB/s Ethernet chip any more, but you need also proper cabling, and it costs a bit more. When you need it -- you?l get it soon.
Fact is that most wired users never consume more than 100Mb/s still, so equipping everybody by 2,5GB/s adapters is just marketing, same way as it is now with 1GB/s. Most embedded "1GB/s" adpaters are cheap and unable to provide more than 200-300Mb/s speeds in fact, but it's OK, as nobody needs more, except for server applications.
 

Ninjawithagun

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Not only is WiFi (i.e. 802.11ac) time division duplex (does not transmit and receive simulataneiously), there is a lot of overhead that reduces bandwidth compared to a hard wired ethernet connection. Packet contention, packet loss, EMI, and encryption all eat up valuable bandwidth on wireless network connections. I have both at my house, but will NOT give up my CAT7 ethernet connection from my gaming PC directly to my 802.11ac gigabit router, thank you very much :D
 

Ninjawithagun

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Not only is WiFi (i.e. 802.11ac) time division duplex (does not transmit and receive simulataneiously), there is a lot of overhead that reduces bandwidth compared to a hard wired ethernet connection. Packet contention, packet loss, EMI, and encryption all eat up valuable bandwidth on wireless network connections. I have both at my house, but will NOT give up my CAT7 ethernet connection from my gaming PC directly to my 802.11ac gigabit router, thank you very much :D
 
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