[SOLVED] running 2 unshielded cat6 ethernet cables in rectangular PVC Conduit Trunking

thosecars82

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Dec 12, 2009
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Hello

I wanted to connect two devices, computer and TV, located within the same room, with a home main router that is in another room.

Firstly I had thought about :

option A) running two ethernet cables from a home main router to both the computer and the TV that are on the same room to achieve maximum bandwith at both devices. But then I wondered whether crosstalk problems might arise as a consequence of running two cat6 unshielded ethernet cables parallel within the same rectangular PVC Conduit Trunking.

An alternative I thought of would be as follows:

option B) installing an available old second router, working as a switch, or buying a new switch in case that was better than using the old second router as a switch. This second router/switch would be within the same room where both computer and TV are located. Then one single cable could be run from the main router to the second router/switch and then two etherhnet cables could be run from the second router/switch to each device: computer and TV.


Do you think there might be crosstalk problems in option A)?

Which option do you suggest?

Thanks in advance.
 
I doubt you can use a gigabit of bandwidth what is connected on the other end.

If you want to run 2 cables there is likely zero chance of crosstalk even if you wrap them together. Make sure you are not using that flat or thin cable those do not have the proper number of twists or wire gauge.

I really wish I had photos of some the equipment racks we used to put in server rooms. There were more than 20 servers in a single rack. Each has 2 power cables as well as a primary and secondary ethernet connection as well as out of band management ethernet port. The cables were packed together and zip tied. It was all nice and neat to ensure good air flow and easy cable replacement but it was still a huge amount of cables. We had long rows of cabinets likes this and never had interference issues and we never used any kind of special ethernet cables other than colors to keep all the networks straight.
 
I doubt you can use a gigabit of bandwidth what is connected on the other end.

If you want to run 2 cables there is likely zero chance of crosstalk even if you wrap them together. Make sure you are not using that flat or thin cable those do not have the proper number of twists or wire gauge.

I really wish I had photos of some the equipment racks we used to put in server rooms. There were more than 20 servers in a single rack. Each has 2 power cables as well as a primary and secondary ethernet connection as well as out of band management ethernet port. The cables were packed together and zip tied. It was all nice and neat to ensure good air flow and easy cable replacement but it was still a huge amount of cables. We had long rows of cabinets likes this and never had interference issues and we never used any kind of special ethernet cables other than colors to keep all the networks straight.
 

gamerbrehdy

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Jun 15, 2018
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We've been using these things in my house for our TV and my PC:

I've switched to WiFi on my computer now and the livingroom-TV is now located above our router, but we're still running another TV via this solution.

This is better than option A, but probs not better than option B
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Hello

I wanted to connect two devices, computer and TV, located within the same room, with a home main router that is in another room.

Firstly I had thought about :

option A) running two ethernet cables from a home main router to both the computer and the TV that are on the same room to achieve maximum bandwith at both devices. But then I wondered whether crosstalk problems might arise as a consequence of running two cat6 unshielded ethernet cables parallel within the same rectangular PVC Conduit Trunking.

An alternative I thought of would be as follows:

option B) installing an available old second router, working as a switch, or buying a new switch in case that was better than using the old second router as a switch. This second router/switch would be within the same room where both computer and TV are located. Then one single cable could be run from the main router to the second router/switch and then two etherhnet cables could be run from the second router/switch to each device: computer and TV.


Do you think there might be crosstalk problems in option A)?

Which option do you suggest?

Thanks in advance.
A single cable from your primary router to a switch in the room with the multiple devices is the best answer. You will have multiple ethernet ports available. You can even add a WIFI access point if you need better WIFI if you have the switch.
 
A single cable from your primary router to a switch in the room with the multiple devices is the best answer. You will have multiple ethernet ports available. You can even add a WIFI access point if you need better WIFI if you have the switch.
And if you are using a repurposed old routers for switch duties, it has a built in access point that you can use to extend wifi.

Using an old router as a switch has no drawbacks compared to just a plain switch. I actually will pick up old routers just to use them as switches since they're cheaper than switches.
 
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thosecars82

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Dec 12, 2009
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I doubt you can use a gigabit of bandwidth what is connected on the other end.

If you want to run 2 cables there is likely zero chance of crosstalk even if you wrap them together. Make sure you are not using that flat or thin cable those do not have the proper number of twists or wire gauge.

I really wish I had photos of some the equipment racks we used to put in server rooms. There were more than 20 servers in a single rack. Each has 2 power cables as well as a primary and secondary ethernet connection as well as out of band management ethernet port. The cables were packed together and zip tied. It was all nice and neat to ensure good air flow and easy cable replacement but it was still a huge amount of cables. We had long rows of cabinets likes this and never had interference issues and we never used any kind of special ethernet cables other than colors to keep all the networks straight.
Question: Did you really mean the cables you used in those servers rooms were just UTP, that means they had neither shielded twisted pairs nor cable foil?

I asked you this because even though the cable I am going to use is NOT a flat one, that means it is the round one, my cable is UTP. That means, their twisted pairs are not shielded and the whole cable does NOT have foil either.


Thanks in advance
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
Question: Did you really mean the cables you used in those servers rooms were just UTP, that means they had neither shielded twisted pairs nor cable foil?

I asked you this because even though the cable I am going to use is NOT a flat one, that means it is the round one, my cable is UTP. That means, their twisted pairs are not shielded and the whole cable does NOT have foil either.


Thanks in advance
We use just cat5e unshielded in server rooms all the time. For gigabit ethernet, you shouldn't have a problem with standard UTP.
 
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