[SOLVED] Running a failing drive alongside a new one

Oct 30, 2020
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Can I continue to run my older sata drive alongside a new ssd in my new system or am I asking for trouble that could affect the health of my new drive? am not concerned about data loss on the old drive just wondering if running it knowing it could fail any time if that could mess my new drive/system up. for example if Im on my completely separate drive and the old one dies, could my computer crash still?

just for the geek inside of us if you care it has 1414 reallocated sectors with 16 pending, 57,409 power on hours.

1TB Hitachi HDS7210

Strong beast but shes definitely past the "reliable" point now.... lul

appreciate the insight !
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yes, it IS a poor idea to continue running a known failing drive. There are a variety of ways in which a drive can take a dirt nap, and some of them can definitely result in damage to other hardware. Beyond the possibility of a drive potentially having a hard failure that causes a massive current draw or direct short internally, it could simply trigger the protection on the power supply or motherboard and cause it to instantly power off, losing anything you were working on or even corrupting the boot partition. It definitely wouldn't be outside the realm of believability to suggest that it might also potentially damage the storage controller on your motherboard if it failed badly enough.

As soon as you KNOW a drive is failing, it should be removed either immediately or as soon as you either recover as much off it as possible or determine that recovery isn't possible. Discarding a failing drive should happen once it begins to fail, not when it is completely ruined.
 
Reactions: thefxgamingrules

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yes, it IS a poor idea to continue running a known failing drive. There are a variety of ways in which a drive can take a dirt nap, and some of them can definitely result in damage to other hardware. Beyond the possibility of a drive potentially having a hard failure that causes a massive current draw or direct short internally, it could simply trigger the protection on the power supply or motherboard and cause it to instantly power off, losing anything you were working on or even corrupting the boot partition. It definitely wouldn't be outside the realm of believability to suggest that it might also potentially damage the storage controller on your motherboard if it failed badly enough.

As soon as you KNOW a drive is failing, it should be removed either immediately or as soon as you either recover as much off it as possible or determine that recovery isn't possible. Discarding a failing drive should happen once it begins to fail, not when it is completely ruined.
 
Reactions: thefxgamingrules
Oct 30, 2020
4
0
10
0
Yes, it IS a poor idea to continue running a known failing drive. There are a variety of ways in which a drive can take a dirt nap, and some of them can definitely result in damage to other hardware. Beyond the possibility of a drive potentially having a hard failure that causes a massive current draw or direct short internally, it could simply trigger the protection on the power supply or motherboard and cause it to instantly power off, losing anything you were working on or even corrupting the boot partition. It definitely wouldn't be outside the realm of believability to suggest that it might also potentially damage the storage controller on your motherboard if it failed badly enough.

As soon as you KNOW a drive is failing, it should be removed either immediately or as soon as you either recover as much off it as possible or determine that recovery isn't possible. Discarding a failing drive should happen once it begins to fail, not when it is completely ruined.

this can be closed if needed, perfect answer thank you sir, I have removed the drive. cheers
 

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